Gutter Cleaning in
Clover SC

Ask Us Anything!

843 606 0798

Quick Quote

The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in Clover, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in Clover.

Service Areas

Gutter Cleaning in Clover, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

foundation-damage.jpg

Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

Wood-Damage.jpg

Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

Landscaping-Damage

Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

Gutter-Damage.jpg

Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in Clover for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in Clover, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

Sagging-Gutters-1

Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

Birds-and-Pests-2.png

Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

Stains-on-Your-Siding-1

Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

Plant-Life-1

Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in Clover, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

Gutter-Installation-sc

At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in Clover, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in Clover:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in Clover. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
Gutter-Installation-sc

Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in Clover, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in Clover, SC:

icon-Pooling-Water
Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
icon-Leaks
Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
icon-Displaced-Hardware
Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
mold
Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
iconPeeling-Paint
Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
Uneven-Gutters
Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in Clover

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in Clover. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

Contact Us

Latest News in Clover

Heritage of Flight reaches new heights in New Carlisle

NEW CARLISLE -- The downtown sidewalks were lined with people, many hoisting flags with “New Carlisle, Ohio” emblazoned on them, while vintage airplanes and cars, trucks, tractors and even horses passed by with passengers throwing enough candy to fill a Halloween bag and cause a dentist shock.New Carlisle’s signature event, the Heritage of Flight Festival, was back and in full force for its 16th year. The festival will continue from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. today.Day two of the three-day festival saw crowds eager to ...

NEW CARLISLE -- The downtown sidewalks were lined with people, many hoisting flags with “New Carlisle, Ohio” emblazoned on them, while vintage airplanes and cars, trucks, tractors and even horses passed by with passengers throwing enough candy to fill a Halloween bag and cause a dentist shock.

New Carlisle’s signature event, the Heritage of Flight Festival, was back and in full force for its 16th year. The festival will continue from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. today.

Day two of the three-day festival saw crowds eager to make up for what they had missed out on last year’s cancellation caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Festival organizers were only too happy to hear the shouts and claps and see smiles in between frequently pulling out their phones and communication devices and hustling place to place to keep the event flowing.

“The community wanted this,” said festival president and New Carlisle mayor Mike Lowrey. “Our car show was one of the biggest ever and that spoke volumes that people are wanting to get back to normal.”

He admitted it was a little tougher to put together being a year out of practice, but the results spoke to the effort.

Beautiful weather accompanied Friday’s kickoff with the annual cruise-in that got people in and energized for more. Saturday’s showpiece parade of planes and community parade only upped the enthusiasm.

Rick Ritter, who served 47 years in the New Carlisle Fire Department including as chief, was recognized for his service with the title of grand marshal, leading the parade in a military Jeep.

Bigger than ever, the vehicles and parade participants passed through Main Street for nearly an hour. While this is one of the few events you’ll find planes being towed down city streets, the sky also brought an aviation surprise.

A pair of Russian Yakovlev Yak-3 planes flew over the skies of New Carlisle several times, leaving contrails. The single-engine trainer planes were from Cold War-era Russia are now owned by private citizens, including one who flew in from Michigan and went right back there to another event.

While the event draws people from all over the area, one group traveled all the way from Clover, S.C.

In 2018, the Clover High School Air Force Junior ROTC unit took a road trip to the National Museum of the United States Air Force and happened to hear about the festival. The story about it became the talk of the unit.

When it came time to make a return, ROTC leader Maj. Brian Batson made sure the trip coincided with the festival.

“We take a couple of major trips a year and we were treated so well at this festival we wanted to bring the kids back,” said Batson. “Everybody here is so super friendly. The kids even got onstage and danced at the car show.”

While there are festivals back home, they didn’t compare to this one, according to cadet Alec DiFrango.

“They had a lot more cars here and nicer cars. This town looks like Clover to me,” he said.

Other cadets celebrated with a chocolate milk party and played volleyball in the CVS parking lot on Friday. Batson hinted that the road out of Clover could lead to New Carlisle on an annual basis.

For Lowrey, that’s confirmation of why they put this festival on.

“For kids, this is special. We’re thankful for everybody that makes this event possible and for the people who come out to it,” he said.

Sunday’s Heritage of Flight Festival highlights include the A Mile of Food food drive at 9 a.m., the Jim Slanker Memorial Chair Races at 1 p.m. and National Kiddie Pedal Tractor Pull at 2.

For more information, go to www.heritageofflight.com.

Bond referendum, COVID updates: 7 things Clover parents should know ahead of 2021-22

The first day of school is less than a week away. The Clover school officials have worked all summer to implement a plan that will bring students back for a year almost free of COVID concerns.Here are seven things Clover families should know ahead of the 2021-22 school year.The Clover School District calendar is available on the district’s webs...

The first day of school is less than a week away. The Clover school officials have worked all summer to implement a plan that will bring students back for a year almost free of COVID concerns.

Here are seven things Clover families should know ahead of the 2021-22 school year.

The Clover School District calendar is available on the district’s website.

The district’s first day of school is Aug. 16, and its last day is May 26. Winter break is scheduled from Dec. 22-Jan. 3, and spring break lasts from April 11-18.

By now, those who need to know the district’s mask policy likely already know, but here’s a reminder:

Masks are strongly recommended but not required, district spokesperson Bryan Dillon said.

While state law prohibits schools from mandating masks, the state Department of Health and Environmental Control this month released its school guidance for the 2021-22 school year, urging all individuals to wear masks in indoor school settings.

Vaccines are also encouraged for eligible students and staff but not required, Dillon said.

Other notable COVID details of the plan include:

The district’s COVID tracker will remain on its website throughout the 2021-22 year.

Chorus concerts. Field trips. Parent lunches. They’re all back.

“Students will have the full complement of things,” Dillon said. “They’ll be scheduled in a way that promotes less capacity at one time, not denying access, but spread out more by grade level rather than whole school.”

Parent lunch visits will be allowed after Labor Day. Seats will be limited using a sign-up procedure and will be on a first come-first served basis.

Field trips, activities and competitions will resume with pre-approval, which will be based on the level of spread with COVID-19 variants, according to the district’s plan.

The Clover School District is growing. Roughly five years ago, the district had around 6,000 students. Now, there’s just under 9,000, and district officials expect that number to keep going up.

With that, the district is working toward passing a bond referendum, totaling just under $197 million, to build a second high school and eighth elementary school, Dillon said. The bond also includes renovation projects to have a third middle school, he said.

There will be a vote on Sept. 18, Dillon said.

“It’s the largest bond that Clover School District has ever taken to the community,” Dillon said.

Clover families can find more information on the district’s website here.

The start of the school day may look a little different for some Clover students who got used to rolling out of bed at the last minute to sign on to Zoom.

With level one, the district’s start times for the 2021-22 year will return to the following times:

Elementary school students will end at 2:20 p.m. Middle and high school students will end at 3:30 p.m.

The start times could change if classes, grades or schools were to switch to level two, according to the district’s plan.

The district’s three level system gives school officials more adaptability if COVID numbers were to climb again, Dillon said.

Clover schools will start next week with in-person learning — or level one, which enforces similar precautions put in place at the end of last year, Dillon said. At level one, masks are encouraged, desks will be placed three feet apart where possible and the lunchroom will be at 50% capacity.

Any change to level two or three, which involve more protective measures, would be in response to virus spread at class, grade or school level, Dillon said. Level two is modified in-person learning and level three is intermittent remote learning.

“One of the things we learned from last year is that we’re able to make changes as needed,” Dillon said. “We don’t have to do it a full sweeping change. We can do it based on the information that we have within our district numbers.”

The three-level system allows the district to makes changes at a class, grade or school level if COVID cases were to rise, he said.

If needed, temporary remote learning — or level three — would be administered to:

“They’d be switched to remote learning for the time period needed to have those numbers come back down to within the parameters that are set,” Dillon said.

Fewer students will remain completely online this year, Dillon said.

Last year, about 1,700 of the district’s 8,950 students were virtual. This year, about 200 will remain at home, Dillon said.

The district plans to maintain a 20 students to one teacher ratio in most classrooms, but that will vary in different schools and grades because of varying populations, Dillon said.

The district has implemented several precautions if a class were to experience a COVID exposure.

At level one, students and staff with symptoms or a positive COVID-19 test will have to isolate for 10 days and participate in contact tracing, according to the district’s plan. Students and staff identified as close contacts will have to quarantine for 14 days.

“We still have to be cautious and have precautions,” Dillon said.

‘Little Warriors’ vow to push on after untimely death of their beloved yoga instructor

The cause of James Gaddy's death remains unknown. But at a memorial service Sunday, his family, friends, and supporters vowed to continue his mission to teach city kids yoga and meditation.James Gaddy, the charismatic fitness trainer on a mission to teach yoga and meditation to students in Camden and beyond, was remembered as a brother, best frie...

The cause of James Gaddy's death remains unknown. But at a memorial service Sunday, his family, friends, and supporters vowed to continue his mission to teach city kids yoga and meditation.

James Gaddy, the charismatic fitness trainer on a mission to teach yoga and meditation to students in Camden and beyond, was remembered as a brother, best friend, teacher, coach, and inspiration.

Under a sky that grew increasingly spectacular as the sun began to set over Cooper River Park in Cherry Hill, more than 100 people on Saturday celebrated the life of a man whose death at age 34 stunned a community he had helped to create.

The young crowd of fitness enthusiasts, people of faith, colleagues, and volunteers who share Gaddy’s commitment to city kids hugged and swapped stories as votive candles began to glow in the deepening darkness.

“When I met him four or five years ago I thought, ‘This guy’s different,’” said Ed Wargus, a fitness coach who lives in Mount Laurel. “It was the way he commanded the room. That presence he had.”

Gaddy, who lived in Oaklyn, died Aug. 29 while vacationing near his childhood home in South Carolina. His body was discovered early that morning in a grassy area near a public walkway in Myrtle Beach; there were no signs of trauma and no cause of death has been determined.

While grief was never far from the surface during the three-hour gathering on the Cooper River deck, the mood was more familial than funereal. Gaddy’s older brother, Hunter, the owner of a construction firm, came up from North Carolina with two of his own children.

“James believed in every single person,” Hunter told the crowd. Gesturing toward the sky, which at that point held little remaining light, he said: “James is already in the place we’re all trying to get to. He’s saying ‘I’m here, I made it,’ and he’s expecting every single one of you not to forget to be great.”

Hunter and other speakers described Gaddy as someone selfless yet happy to be front and center. A person who could be loud but also cherished meditation and prayer. A leader whose energy, enthusiasm, and persuasive powers seemed inexhaustible.

Even after death, Gaddy continues to inspire the work of Project Little Warriors, the nonprofit he cofounded with Marialana “Ria” Curry in 2017. It offers free after-school yoga, meditation, and mindfulness instruction classes, as well as summer camps where young “scholars” (in Gaddy’s parlance) can enjoy swimming, writing journals under the trees, and yoga on the beach. The target audience is boys and girls of color who might otherwise have little access to yoga classes or summer camps.

“The future of Project Little Warriors is big and bright,” said Curry, 23, of Maple Shade. “We’re going to grow, we’re going to move into more schools, and we’re going to serve more students.”

“James’ words and his mission really echo with so many people who don’t want to let this [project] go,” she said. “The support from the community has been absolutely stunning.”

Said Haddonfield businesswoman Kathy Tully, a longtime Project Little Warriors funder: “So many people have been affected by James’ death. I’m here to support them and will continue to support the organization because there’s a lot more still to accomplish. Ria knows what Project Little Warriors is supposed to be, and she has wonderful people around her to help.”

Gaddy’s mother, Danielle Wagner, has been ailing and was unable to attend the event. During a telephone interview from her home in Clover, S.C., she recalled the youngest of her five children as “a ball of energy, everywhere, all the time” who could “light up a room” even as an infant.

“I was a single mom with five kids,” said Wagner. “I had to work five jobs to keep us going. Most of the time we were broke. Sometimes we had no food.”

“James was working from a very young age. He was always running little home businesses on the side. We were baking bread, and he sold it. He was very entrepreneurial.”

Despite their circumstances, Wagner said she and her children “all wanted to help the less fortunate.” She sees that aspiration reflected in Project Little Warriors, about which her son James was fiercely proud.

“He wanted to have impact,” said Wagner. “He got the notion to teach the kids, and I think that was God’s work.”

Although a man of faith, Gaddy also embraced life’s pleasures, speakers at the event said. He liked to drive fast, dress stylishly, dine out, and hang out. He had a way of becoming best friends quickly and keeping up such relationships over many years and at long distances.

Gaddy also was capable of great kindness. Brian Peyton, a manager at a California restaurant where Gaddy worked more than a decade ago, remembered him buying a memory card for a table of eight who had exhausted the capacity of their digital camera during a special occasion dinner.

Tierney Eifert, PLW’s clinical director, said Gaddy once defused a potentially humiliating encounter at a venue where the organization was to present a program.

After seeing “the blood drain from the face” of a woman who realized she had double-booked the event, Gaddy, who understandably could have responded with anger, instead said “it seems like you really need this,” and offered the double-booker a hug, Eifert said.

“We miss James [and his] ginormous hugs,” she said, adding that among her favorite James-isms was his standard message when saying goodbye: “Go love somebody today.”

While devastated by Gaddy’s death, friends and family are taking comfort in his legacy.

”I’m thrilled at all the lives James has touched,” said his mother. “I don’t think it stops here. I think it goes on and on and on.”

Week 4 ACC Football Players of the Week

GREENSBORO, N.C. (theACC.com) – The Atlantic Coast Conference Football Players of the Week have been recognized following their standout performances in last weekend’s games.The selections are determined by a vote of a select media panel. The following are this week’s honorees:QUARTERBACK – Devin Leary, NC State, So., QB, Sicklerville, N.J. Named the Walter Camp FBS Offensive Player of the Week following his performance in Saturday’s 27-21 double-overtime win ove...

GREENSBORO, N.C. (theACC.com) – The Atlantic Coast Conference Football Players of the Week have been recognized following their standout performances in last weekend’s games.

The selections are determined by a vote of a select media panel. The following are this week’s honorees:

QUARTERBACK – Devin Leary, NC State, So., QB, Sicklerville, N.J. Named the Walter Camp FBS Offensive Player of the Week following his performance in Saturday’s 27-21 double-overtime win over No. 9 Clemson • Completed 32 of his 44 passing attempts (.727) for 238 yards • Threw for four touchdowns, including two in overtime.

RUNNING BACK – Pat Garwo III, Boston College, So., RB, Levittown, Pa. Rushed for 175 yards on a career-high 25 carries in Saturday’s 41-34 win over visiting Missouri • Ripped off a career-long 67-yard run for BC’s first touchdown to cap off a 99-yard scoring drive • After entering the 2021 campaign with 195 rushing yards in 10 career games, Garwo has rushed for a total of 412 yards in the Eagles’ first four games this season.

RECEIVER – Emeka Emezie, NC State, Sr., WR, Waxhaw, N.C. Pulled down a career-high 14 receptions in the Wolfpack’s win over No. 9 Clemson • His 116 receiving yards were also a career high, as he registered 46 yards after catch • His 22-yard touchdown catch on a pass from Devin Leary in the first quarter was the first offensive touchdown scored against the Tigers all year.

OFFENSIVE LINEMAN – Ikem Ekwonu, NC State, So., OT, Charlotte, N.C. Played a career-high 102 snaps in Saturday’s 27-21 double-overtime win over No. 9 Clemson • Posted the highest grade on the offensive line as the Wolfpack held the ball for 41 minutes and 48 seconds • Tallied eight pancake blocks plus three knockdowns.

DEFENSIVE LINEMAN – Cody Roscoe, Syracuse, Sr., DL, Houston, Texas Had two sacks in the Orange’s 24-21 win over previously unbeaten Liberty on Friday night, including a crucial strip-sack of Liberty QB Malik Willis with four minutes remaining • Roscoe jarred the ball free and Syracuse recovered,, setting up the Orange’s winning field goal • Recorded six total tackles • Has 5.0 sacks in the last-two games and ranks third nationally with 5.5 sacks on the year.

CO-LINEBACKER – Baylon Spector, Clemson, Sr., LB, Calhoun, Ga. A week after being sidelined due to a knee inflammation, returned to the lineup and recorded a team-high 19 tackles at NC State • Most tackles by a Clemson player in a single game under Dabo Swinney, one ahead of Spencer Shuey’s 18 against Georgia in 2013 • Most tackles by a Clemson player since 2002, when John Leake recorded 21 stops against Maryland • Led a defense that faced 96 plays while adjusting to the in-game losses of starters James Skalski and Bryan Bresee.

CO-LINEBACKER – Charlie Thomas, Georgia Tech, Jr., LB, Thomasville, Ga. Perhaps the biggest contributor to Georgia Tech’s stellar defensive performance in Saturday night’s 45-22 win over No. 21 North Carolina • Stuffed the stat sheet with 2.5 sacks, 4.5 tackles for loss and eight total tackles • Marked only the 11th time since 2000 that an ACC player recorded at least eight tackles, 2.5 sacks and 4.5 tackles for loss in a single game • Only the second Power 5 conference player and fourth player in all of FBS with eight tackles, 2.5 sacks and 4.5 tackles for loss in a game this season • Led a defensive effort that saw Georgia Tech limit North Carolina’s high-powered offense to nearly 21 points and 185 yards below its season averages entering the game.

DEFENSIVE BACK – Brandon Sebastian, Boston College, Gr., CB, West Haven, Conn. Made the interception that clinched Saturday’s 41-34 overtime win over visiting Missouri • The pickoff was the sixth of his career and second of the season • His seven tackles in Saturday’s game tied graduate linebacker Isaiah Graham-Mobley for the team lead.

CO-SPECIALIST – Tayvion Robinson, Virginia Tech, So., KR, Virginia Beach, Va. Scored his first career TD on a 60-yard punt return in the second quarter of Saturday’s 21-10 win over Richmond • Averaged 22 yards per punt return on the day • Registered an additional 76 yards on six receptions and finished the day with 140 all-purpose yards.

CO-SPECIALIST – Nick Sciba, Wake Forest, Jr., PK, Clover, S.C. Connected on three field goals without a miss in Friday night’s 37-17 road win at Virginia • Improved his consecutive number of field goal tries without a miss to 19, which stands as the longest active streak in the NCAA • Made good on field goals of 46, 23 and 35 yards versus the Cavaliers, with his 46-yarder matching his longest this season • Sciba owns a .901 career field goal percentage (64-of-71), the highest in NCAA history.

ROOKIE – Rodney Hammond Jr., Pitt, Fr., RB, Norfolk, Va. Rushed for a career-high 100 yards on 17 carries (5.9 avg.) with three touchdowns in Saturday’s 77-7 win over New Hampshire • Became the first Pitt freshman to rush for three touchdowns in a game since Dion Lewis had three against Cincinnati on Dec. 5, 2009 • Hammond also became the first Pitt freshman to rush for 100 yards since V’Lique Carter had 137 against Duke on Oct. 27, 2018.

Clover schools change start times to address overcrowded buses

Clover school officials said more than 1,000 students who weren't registered rode buses Monday, causing overcrowding.YORK COUNTY, S.C. — The Clover School District announced it will change start times for middle and high school students after buses were overcrowded during the first week of school.The district said that over 1,000 additional students who weren't registered rose the buses to school Monday. Now, middle schools will start at 8 a.m., while high school students will start at 9 a.m. each day.Those changes...

Clover school officials said more than 1,000 students who weren't registered rode buses Monday, causing overcrowding.

YORK COUNTY, S.C. — The Clover School District announced it will change start times for middle and high school students after buses were overcrowded during the first week of school.

The district said that over 1,000 additional students who weren't registered rose the buses to school Monday. Now, middle schools will start at 8 a.m., while high school students will start at 9 a.m. each day.

Those changes will take effect Monday, Aug. 23.

An ongoing bus driver shortage has also caused issues with overcrowding on buses. Curt Macysyn, the executive director of the National School Transportation Association, said the pandemic made the existing shortage worse.

"All indications are there is a bus driver shortage," Macysyn said. "We have seen this occur over the past several years, but certainly, with the onset of COVID-19 and the challenges of the pandemic, it certainly exacerbated the condition this year."

In Lancaster County, drivers were being offered up to $20 an hour with other incentives for new drivers. The district was offering a one-time $1,000 bonus across the county, with Indian Land drivers who were on the job for 30 days being eligible for a $2,500 bonus.

Tanya Mendis is digging into overcrowded school buses in Clover. Her full report will air Thursday during WCNC Charlotte News at 6.

Wake Up Charlotte To Go is a daily news and weather podcast you can listen to so you can start your day with the team at Wake Up Charlotte. SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts || Spotify || Stitcher || TuneIn || Google Podcasts

All of WCNC Charlotte's podcasts are free and available for both streaming and download. You can listen now on Android, iPhone, Amazon, and other internet-connected devices. Join us from North Carolina, South Carolina, or on the go anywhere.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.