Gutter Cleaning in
Fort Mill SC

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The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in Fort Mill, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in Fort Mill.

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Gutter Cleaning in Fort Mill, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

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Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

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Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

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Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

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Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in Fort Mill for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in Fort Mill, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

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Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

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Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

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Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

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Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in Fort Mill, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

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At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in Fort Mill, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in Fort Mill:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in Fort Mill. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
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Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in Fort Mill, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in Fort Mill, SC:

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Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
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Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
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Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
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Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
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Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
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Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in Fort Mill

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in Fort Mill. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

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Latest News in Fort Mill

Fort Mill struck down three big, recent residential projects. Will it become a trend?

Has Fort Mill turned a corner on new home decisions? Or, maybe the recent cases in a case-by-case approach are just a little different.Fort Mill Town Council recently voted down — or had a tied vote, which has the same result — two plans that would add age-restricted housing. Those decisions come three months after the town voted down another large proposal for new homes on the Dobys Bridge Road corridor.Wit...

Has Fort Mill turned a corner on new home decisions? Or, maybe the recent cases in a case-by-case approach are just a little different.

Fort Mill Town Council recently voted down — or had a tied vote, which has the same result — two plans that would add age-restricted housing. Those decisions come three months after the town voted down another large proposal for new homes on the Dobys Bridge Road corridor.

With Councilman Larry Huntley not present, council split several 3-3 votes July 12 on a proposal to annex, rezone and develop 115 acres on Fort Mill Parkway. Submitted plans showed up to 220 independent and assisted-living residential units, up to 150 age-restricted homes and 90 townhomes. Plans showed a grocery store and commercial elements in the Williams, Legion and Haire roads area.

A tied vote means a decision doesn’t pass. It’s why most municipalities have an odd number of seats, to avoid ties that function like failed votes.

Also at the July 12 meeting, council more conventionally voted down an annexation for age-restricted residences on seven acres at Pleasant and Whitley roads.

In April, council voted against a DR Horton plan for 267 homes on 195 acres on South Dobys Bridge Road. The issue there involved roads with already failing traffic levels.

A look at Fort Mill in recent years shows many new residences have been built. The growth rate in Fort Mill dwarfs that of most anywhere else in the area — Indian Land is competitive, while Tega Cay and Lake Wylie have been in recent years — for the past decade.

The most recent U.S. Census Bureau projections put Fort Mill at more than 22,000 residents. The 2020 projection is up almost 12% in a year, about three times the next highest growth area in the county. The Fort Mill population has more than doubled since 2010.

As the town has grown, so has the concern for traffic. It’s easily the most common refrain from residents who address council when new residential projects come up for discussion. Council members routinely say it’s at the top of their list for public concerns sent or stated to them.

Traffic was the reason given for the DR Horton project denial three months ago. For the recent projects, it was part but not all of the concern.

Mayor Guynn Savage said at the recent meeting emails, calls and conversation at the grocery store is consistent when it comes to residential growth.

“There’s no interruption in that message, that enough is enough,” she said.

Still, on the recent Pleasant Road project she reminded council and constituents that each decision is its own.

“For me it still boils down to, what is in this proposal for Fort Mill?” Savage said. “And I haven’t had anyone ask me to go out and seek new residential homes in Fort Mill. Not one.”

Savage said moratorium comes up often, but the town can’t put one in place without a defined problem to fix in the time it would last. Otherwise the town would simply be taking away property rights.

The town also has to consider with each project, what else may come if it doesn’t pass? Some major proposals might fall flat without annexation into the town, as they couldn’t get needed utilities. Others could grow even larger as county projects, without contributing to the town tax base.

The Pleasant Road project was proposed in 2018, delayed twice and returned as an age-restricted project to it wouldn’t impact schools or traffic, at least as much. Two public hearings showed neighbors largely opposed the new plan. Still, Councilman Jamie Shirey voted in favor of it based on what he sees coming.

“Everybody votes in their own direction but, this property is going to get developed,” Shirey said. “One way or the other. Either we are in control of it or somebody else is in control of it. It’s inevitable.”

Projects come in with planned road and other improvements that may appeal to the town. The memory care element of the Fort Mill Parkway plan, several council members said, is something Fort Mill doesn’t have. Plus, Savage said, some of the projects turned away of late were good quality or from quality developers.

“I find it very difficult for me that we can have quality developers come in, spend the money, spend the time, think they’ve checked every block, think they’ve done everything we asked of them, and then we turn them down,” Savage said.

She said there’s no automatic yes vote, but would like to see the town add “speed bumps” in the planning process to let developers know sooner if traffic or another issue will make certain properties unfeasible.

While multiple high-profile projects voted down the past three months may seem like a trend, elected officials say each case has to be viewed on its own merit. Councilman Chris Moody had concern on the Fort Mill Parkway plan with elderly residents having to cross a major road.

“The safety is my main concern,” he said. “I worry about an elderly person going across that bypass, and somebody smacking them going at 45 mph. It’s going to happen.”

Councilwoman Trudie Heemsoth shared that idea.

“My biggest concern would be getting out on the road,” she said.

Still, many of the concerns surrounding residential projects date back to past ones. Many roads in town have failing traffic grades due at least in part to so many more people and businesses in the area. Moody echoed something at the recent meeting his mayor stated in the decision three months ago, that so many past yes votes on residential projects play heavily into current decisions.

“I think that’s the problem,” Moody said. “We haven’t said no.”

National Industrial Weighing Scales Leader Offers It\'s Services To Businesses In South Carolina and North Carolina

Fort Mill, SC based Superior Scale Inc. (SSI) is pleased to bring their industrial weighing scales and rental equipment to local businesses. Representing the top ranks of the industry in both South Carolina and North Carolina, Superior Scale Inc. is keen to show new customers why their weighing services and solutions are held in such high regard.Superior Scale attributes much of their success to their ability to service a wide variety of customers in virtually ...

Fort Mill, SC based Superior Scale Inc. (SSI) is pleased to bring their industrial weighing scales and rental equipment to local businesses. Representing the top ranks of the industry in both South Carolina and North Carolina, Superior Scale Inc. is keen to show new customers why their weighing services and solutions are held in such high regard.

Superior Scale attributes much of their success to their ability to service a wide variety of customers in virtually any weighing-related capacity they may need. The company has performed industrial weighing services for customers from the following industries: food & beverage, vehicle & transportation, shipping & freight, concrete & asphalt, chemical, pharmaceutical & laboratory and more. According to their team, a customer can always expect to approach their representatives and have a satisfactory weighing solution ready by the end of their consultations. Superior Scale is confident that they can rise to meet any challenge no matter the commercial niche a customer may occupy.

Furthermore, the company recognizes that each business has unique needs, and no solution can be deployed on a universal basis. As such, this has the effect of making it difficult for certain customers to decide which weighing products best fit their requirements, especially if they occupy a relatively unknown industry and are just beginning to expand. Fortunately, SSI employs a fully-fledged team of experts who are accustomed to learning everything about a customer’s operations and systematically developing a solution that suits both their application and budget.

“Your time is extremely valuable to you,” observes Superior Scale, “so we make it our business to minimize how long you have to spend locating the tools you need. Our team has worked with countless customers from innumerable fields, and they have delivered on every occasion. When you approach Superior Scale for assistance, you can expect us to be with you at every step of the process, from helping you develop a solution that meets your operational needs to tailoring our products and services in order to stay within budget. Our foremost goal is always your satisfaction.” Learn more here: https://superiorscales.com/products/.

The scales offered by Superior Scale come in several varieties, from forklift/pallet scales and floor scales to analytical balances, load cells, truck or rail scales and more. The company sells and supports products from many top manufacturers, including Rice Lake Weighing Systems, A&D Weighing, Avery-Weigh-Tronix and so on. SSI asserts that any recommendations they make will take each manufacturer’s individual strengths into account in order to comply with customer requirements.

Alternatively, customers may elect to rent scales and similar equipment rather than make an outright purchase, which can also be an inexpensive way to test the company’s solutions before adopting them completely. On the other hand, Superior Scale acknowledges that certain enterprises may only require scales or laboratory balances at infrequent intervals, making their purchase an unnecessary investment. However, this does not mean they should have to make do with substandard equipment. SSI is extremely competent at managing, calibrating and servicing the equipment they sell, and this expertise carries over to their rental options as well. As such, they can provide a full array of scales and balances from grams to 200,000 pounds.

Superior Scale highlights several benefits to renting — in addition to foregoing the initial investment of making a purchase, customers also do not have to concern themselves with maintenance costs or ongoing storage for equipment that does not see much use. SSI has also built a platform that allows customers to receive virtually the same support they would if they owned the equipment, including on-site training (as needed), the ability to request servicing and so on. Equipment may be rented for as long as necessary as well. Learn more here: https://superiorscales.com/rentals/.

Notably, all customers should be aware that the company maintains standard business hours but is willing to accommodate jobs after hours in certain situations. Customers are welcome to contact Superior Scale Inc. for more information on this and any other concerns they may have. They may also visit the company’s official website to learn more about their products and services or request a quote. Similarly, they may stay up to date with the company’s latest news and announcements through their preferred social media platforms.

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For more information about Superior Scale Inc., contact the company here:

Superior Scale Inc. Steve Daniels (803) 548-3320 info@superiorscales.com 2118 Carolina Place Dr Fort Mill, SC 29708

Marty Conner won’t return as principal at South Pointe High School next year

South Pointe High School has begun its search for a new principal.Marty Conner, the Rock Hill school’s second principal since it opened in 2005, will not return as South Pointe’s leader in 2021-22. He instead will be the “Administrator of Alternative Learning Programs” for the Rock Hill school district — a job that includes overseeing Raven Academy, Renaissance Academy, the T3 Elementary Center and the new Day Treatment Center.Dr. Marek Marshall, who worked as South Pointe’s assistant princip...

South Pointe High School has begun its search for a new principal.

Marty Conner, the Rock Hill school’s second principal since it opened in 2005, will not return as South Pointe’s leader in 2021-22. He instead will be the “Administrator of Alternative Learning Programs” for the Rock Hill school district — a job that includes overseeing Raven Academy, Renaissance Academy, the T3 Elementary Center and the new Day Treatment Center.

Dr. Marek Marshall, who worked as South Pointe’s assistant principal in 2020-21, will act as the school’s interim principal while the district searches for Conner’s full-time replacement.

“Dr. Conner’s extensive experience and success in a similar position at Fort Mill as their Director of Alternative Programs make him uniquely qualified to step into the role,” Rock Hill Schools spokesperson Lindsay Machak told The Herald via statement. She added, “We are confident he will do amazing work in his new role this upcoming year.”

The staffing change was one of about 20 across the district this summer. Superintendent Bill Cook notified South Pointe families of the change in leadership via letter the first week of July.

“Having faithfully served as principal at South Pointe High School for the past three years, Dr. Marty Conner has been a strong leader and advocate for all students,” Cook wrote.

In the letter, Cook referenced several of Conner’s accolades as South Pointe’s leader. Among them: his reputation for being an advocate for “all types of learners” and for “building lasting relationships with parents, students and (the) community” in his 20-plus-year career in education.

The letter also states that Conner will begin his new role July 19. The selection process for a new South Pointe principal began July 1.

“As with all principal-level interviews, input is very important,” Cook wrote in the letter. “Parents, students, and school staff will be invited to participate by serving on the interview committee as well as be involved in the selection process by providing feedback on the characteristics of the candidates we are seeking. Communication outlining feedback opportunities will be shared as they become available.”

Conner earned an undergraduate degree from Norfolk State University, where he also had a decorated football career as a wide receiver. He’d go on to earn his master’s in Education Administration and Supervision from George Washington University.

After that, Conner notched several accomplishments as an educator in York County: He was the principal at Fort Mill’s Banks Trail Middle School when the school won the school Palmetto Gold award — the highest award given to a school by the S.C. Department of Education, per the district’s website. Also in his tenure as the Fort Mill School District’s alternative programs director, he increased the graduation rate of alternative school students and reduced the drop-out rate.

In 2018, Conner took the job as South Pointe’s principal, succeeding the beloved Al Leonard, who opened South Pointe in 2005.

In his first year, a petition advocating to “impeach” Conner circulated among students and parents, arguing that Conner was creating a “hostile environment” at South Pointe. The petition had more than 1,500 signatures, with a goal of 2,500.

In response, Conner sent a letter to South Pointe parents, addressing the complaints in the petition as “misperceptions and misinformation” that had “caused distractions to the quality of learning,” The Herald previously reported. He then later that week told students and parents at an open house that he had plans to improve educational opportunities and the culture at South Pointe.

“It is my goal that in three years from now this school, no question for me, will be the best school not in our district, but in the state and in our country,” Conner said at the time. “The reason being because we have good people here doing good work for the right purpose.”

Among the other faculty changes in the Rock Hill school district: Walter Wolff has been named as the Director of K-12 Virtual Academy, and Nancy Turner has been named as the Director of Mental Health for Rock Hill Schools.

Check back for updates on this developing story.

Fort Mill sent its all-star sluggers to face the best. They’ll come home state champs.

A team of Fort Mill ballplayers are state champions.The coach pitch baseball all-stars from the Fort Mill rec league won the Dixie Youth Baseball state championship on Tuesday morning. The squad bested a 12-team field by beating Greer in the final of the state tournament held in Orangeburg.The team next travels to Laurel, Miss. for the Dixie Youth World Series on Aug. 6.“We’ve got one heck of a team here,” said head coach Ryan Smith. ...

A team of Fort Mill ballplayers are state champions.

The coach pitch baseball all-stars from the Fort Mill rec league won the Dixie Youth Baseball state championship on Tuesday morning. The squad bested a 12-team field by beating Greer in the final of the state tournament held in Orangeburg.

The team next travels to Laurel, Miss. for the Dixie Youth World Series on Aug. 6.

“We’ve got one heck of a team here,” said head coach Ryan Smith. “We’ve worked really, really hard. Two hours a day, four days a week. That doesn’t count what they’re doing in their garage at home.”

The all-stars started their six-game run on Saturday with wins over host Orangeburg, and McLeod Park. The team won against Gregg Park on Sunday, then beat Greer for the first of two times on Monday afternoon. A win Monday night against Moncks Corner set up a championship rematch Tuesday morning against Greer.

Coach pitch teams in Fort Mill and at the state tournament play in the eight years and under division.

The team won four games, giving up just four runs, at the six-team district tournament to qualify for state. The team had about as many shutouts at state as they had games giving up runs, all with the other teams hitting pitching from their own coaches.

“The defense is incredible,” Smith said. “We gave up nine runs in the entire (state) tournament, I believe. They worked really hard on it.”

The team is coached by a full bench of former college players, but the coach pitch team has supremely talented athletes, their coach says. Now, the team will prepare for a World Series run.

“We need to raise money because it’s going to be very expensive,” Smith said.

Smith said support from team families has been a strength too, from snacks and drinks to shagging balls in the outfield at practice.

Team players are Calvin Krantz, Easton Nesteruk, Henry Herchek, Tyler Teaver, Graham Mattox, Chase Smith, Ethan Rodriguez, Clay Swenson, Jace Griffin, Gordon Owino, Ishaan Alluri and Brady Childers. Smith is the manager, with coaches Jad Griffin, Chris Mattox and Kevin Nesteruk.

U.S. Girls\' Junior: Tee times and players to watch

The U.S. Girls’ Junior is back.After a year-long hiatus because of the COVID-19 pandemic, one of the most-coveted events on the junior schedule returns at Columbia Country Club in Chevy Chase, Maryland. Beginning in 2017, the U.S. Golf Association put a U.S. Women’s Open exemption on the line for the winner of the event so there’s much to play for this week. The 156-player field will be whittled down to 64 players after two rounds of stroke play, and from there five rounds of match-play commence to decide a champion....

The U.S. Girls’ Junior is back.

After a year-long hiatus because of the COVID-19 pandemic, one of the most-coveted events on the junior schedule returns at Columbia Country Club in Chevy Chase, Maryland. Beginning in 2017, the U.S. Golf Association put a U.S. Women’s Open exemption on the line for the winner of the event so there’s much to play for this week. The 156-player field will be whittled down to 64 players after two rounds of stroke play, and from there five rounds of match-play commence to decide a champion.

Most conspicuously missing from the field is Megha Ganne, Golfweek’s top-ranked junior and practically a household name after her 14th-place finish at last month’s U.S. Women’s Open, which earned her low-amateur honors.

Despite Ganne’s absence, there are plenty of names to watch in the field, including the following women:

The college kids

When the U.S. Girls’ Junior was canceled last summer, it meant players in the class of 2020 wouldn’t get their last-ditch effort at a title in this event. Players are eligible to compete in the Girls’ Junior provided they do not turn 19 before July 17, so nine current collegians were able to qualify into the event and can still play. That group of nine brings some pretty stout college resumes to Maryland, too.

The cross-over stars

Will this be the year that Alexa Pano finally gets her U.S. Girls’ Junior title? Back in 2018, Pano finished runner-up to Yealimi Noh after a marathon day at Poppy Hills Golf Course in Pebble Beach, California. The 16-year-old has appeared everywhere from the junior-golf documentary “The Short Game” to Symetra Tour and LPGA tour events to the U.S. Women’s Open, and now plays the Girls’ Junior for a fourth time.

Rose Zhang, the No. 1-ranked amateur in the world and the reigning U.S. Women’s Amateur champion, seems another easy favorite for this title.

The 12-year-olds

In women’s golf, a 12-year-old (or 11-year-old or 10-year-old) in the field at a USGA championship is hardly even cause for a second glance. There’s been a long line of such players in recent years. This year, Asterisk Talley and Anna Huang represent the two youngest players in the field at 12 years old. The average age of competitors this week, by the way, is 16.42.

The champs

Two women in the field have already won a USGA title this year. That would be U.S. Women’s Amateur Four-Ball champions Savannah Barber and Alex Saldana. The two Texas residents are roommates at the Crown Golf Academy in Arlington and earned their spot in this week’s field with their Four-Ball win.

The (young) veteran

For a 14-year-old, Avery Zweig has made an impressive number of USGA starts. This week marks her sixth championship but her second Girls’ Junior, and she’s coming off a start in last week’s Volunteers of America Classic on the LPGA.

Schedule

7 a.m. / 12:30 p.m. – Faith Choi, Frederick, Md.; Julia Misemer, Overland Park, Kan.; Sophie Thai, Los Altos, Calif.

7:10 a.m. / 12:40 p.m. – Isabella McCauley, Inver Grove Heights, Minn.; Teal Matsueda, Honolulu, Hawaii; Thitaporn Saithip, Thailand

7:21 a.m. / 12:51 p.m. – Xin Kou, People’s Republic of China; Kiera Bartholomew, Wake Forest, N.C.; Alexia Siehl, Fort Mill, S.C.

7:31 a.m. / 1:01 p.m. – Kary Hollenbaugh, New Albany, Ohio; Karen Tsuru, Carlsbad, Calif.; Lexanne Halama, Knoxville, Tenn.

7:42 a.m. / 1:12 p.m. – Sophie Linder, Carthage, Tenn.; Emily McKee, Canada; Raleygh Simpson, Kerrville, Texas

7:52 a.m. / 1:22 p.m. – Emily Odwin, Barbados; Jordan Fischer, North Ft. Myers, Fla.; Zoe Antoinette Campos, Valencia, Calif.

8:03 a.m. / 1:33 p.m. – Natalie Cao, Sugar Land, Texas; Erin Lee, Canada; Asterisk Talley, Chowchilla, Calif.

8:13 a.m. / 1:43 p.m. – Savannah Barber, Fort Worth, Texas; Regina Plascencia, Mexico; Ellen Yu, Greensboro, N.C.

8:24 a.m. / 1:54 p.m. – Alissa C. Xu, Canada; Lauryn Nguyen, Seattle, Wash.; Apelila Galeai, Orem, Utah

8:34 a.m. / 2:04 p.m. – Rylie Heflin, Kennett Square, Pa.; Taylor Kehoe, Canada; Jenni Roller, Jenks, Okla.

8:45 a.m. / 2:15 p.m. – Chloe Lam, Fountain Valley, Calif.; Valeria Ramirez, Colombia; Malia Cottriel, Costa Mesa, Calif.

8:55 a.m. / 2:25 p.m. – Faith Low, Foster City, Calif.; Anna Huang, Canada; Bridget Chantharath, Irvine, Calif.

9:06 a.m. / 2:36 p.m. – Sophia Bae, Norwood, N.J.; Laney Frye, Nicholasville, Ky.; Esther Lee, Walnut, Calif.

7:15 a.m. / 12:15 p.m. – Bailey Davis, White Plains, Md.; Nicole Kolbas, Lincoln, Neb.; Sophia Sulkar, Barrington Hills, Ill.

7:25 a.m. / 12:25 p.m. – Grace Kilcrease, Springdale, Ark.; Lacey Uchida, Hilo, Hawaii; Kiara Romero, San Jose, Calif.

7:36 a.m. / 12:36 p.m. – Isabella Van der Biest, Kingsport, Tenn.; Kyra Ly, Portland, Ore.; Reagan Gray, Missouri City, Texas

7:46 a.m. / 12:46 p.m. – Kate Bennett, McKinney, Texas; Lauren Sammon, Murrieta, Calif.; Kylie Chong, Torrance, Calif.

7:57 a.m. / 12:57 p.m. – Mia Hammond, New Albany, Ohio; Michelle Woo, Fremont, Calif.; Ali Mulhall, Green River, Wyo.

8:07 a.m. / 1:07 p.m. – Mackenzie Moore, Trophy Club, Texas; Reagan Chaney, Ardmore, Okla.; Ava Ray, Franklin, Ind.

8:18 a.m. / 1:18 p.m. – Jennifer Cai, Irvine, Calif.; Alexa Pano, Lake Worth, Fla.; Ashley Lafontaine, Canada

8:28 a.m. / 1:28 p.m. – Iris Cao, Duluth, Ga.; Amari Avery, Riverside, Calif.; Sky Sudberry, The Woodlands, Texas

8:39 a.m. / 1:39 p.m. – Caroline Canales, Calabasas, Calif.; Addison Klonowski, Naples, Fla.; Grace Lee, Bellevue, Wash.

8:49 a.m. / 1:49 p.m. – Alexa Saldana, Mexico; Ashley Liu, Plano, Texas; Saanvi Kotti, Folsom, Calif.

9 a.m. / 2 p.m. – Melanie Walker, Burke, Va.; Yetong (Alicia) Qian, Windermere, Fla.; Kendall Maynard, Clarksville, Tenn.

9:10 a.m. / 2:10 p.m. – Camille Boyd, Seattle, Wash.; Katie Park, Fairfax, Va.; Borina Sutikto, Fremont, Calif.

9:21 a.m. / 2:21 p.m. – Lisa Marie Rudometkin, Wesley Chapel, Fla.; Yana Wilson, Henderson, Nev.; Lion Higo, Australia

12:15 p.m. / 7:15 a.m. – Alexandra Gazzoli, Palm Coast, Fla.; Chloe Johnson, Evansville, Ind.; Grace Sinclair, Brandon, Miss.

12:25 p.m. / 7:25 a.m. – Lana Calibuso-Kwee, Wailuku, Hawaii; Leigh Chien, Irvine, Calif.; Kate Tilma, Wichita, Kan.

12:36 p.m. / 7:36 a.m. – Yunxuan Zhang, People’s Republic of China; Emma Shen, Demarest, N.J.; Kathryn Vanarragon, Blaine, Minn.

12:46 p.m. / 7:46 a.m. – Molly Hardwick, Nashville, Tenn.; Charlene Chung, Hong Kong China; Raegan Capizzi, Scottsdale, Ariz.

12:57 p.m. / 7:57 a.m. – Mia Nixon, Martins Mill, Texas; Shoshana Zuck, Derwood, Md.; Anna Howerton, Winston Salem, N.C.

1:07 p.m. / 8:07 a.m. – Chloe Kim, Whittier, Calif.; Maggie Ni, Cypress, Texas; Camila Madariaga, Mexico

1:18 p.m. / 8:18 a.m. – Avery Zweig, McKinney, Texas; Alice Hodge, Larchmont, N.Y.; Yoko Tai, Singapore

1:28 p.m. / 8:28 a.m. – Drew Nienhaus, St. Albans, Mo.; Morgan Smith, Westford, Mass.; Christine Chang, Auburn, Ala.

1:39 p.m. / 8:39 a.m. – Grace Holcomb, Wilmington, N.C.; Antonia Matte, Chile; Bailey Shoemaker, West Edmeston, N.Y.

1:49 p.m. / 8:49 a.m. – Reagan Zibilski, Springfield, Mo.; Kylee Choi, Murrieta, Calif.; Angelina Kim, Tenafly, N.J.

2 p.m. / 9 a.m. – Michelle Ding, Canada; Lynn Lim, Nashville, Tenn.; Erica Villegas, Fairfield, Calif.

2:10 p.m. / 9:10 a.m. – Karoline Tuttle, Lake Mary, Fla.; Maelynn Kim, Katy, Texas; Alexsandra Lapple, Pinehurst, N.C.

2:21 p.m. / 9:21 a.m. – Rose Zhang, Irvine, Calif.; Jacqueline Putrino, Lakewood Ranch, Fla.; Kennedy Swedick, Albany, N.Y.

12:30 p.m. / 7 a.m. – Paula Miranda, Mexico; Yvonne Vinceri, Portland, Ore.; Gracie McGovern, Scottsdale, Ariz.

12:40 p.m. / 7:10 a.m. – Katie Li, Basking Ridge, N.J.; Caroline Hwang, Orlando, Fla.; Kennedy Knox, Seattle, Wash.

12:51 p.m. / 7:21 a.m. – Victoria Zheng, Canada; Rianne Mikhaela Malixi, Philippines; Anna Davis, Spring Valley, Calif.

1:01 p.m. / 7:31 a.m. – Mayumi Umezu, Waimea, Hawaii; Giovanna Fernandez, Paraguay; Carlee Rogers, Whitwell, Tenn.

1:12 p.m. / 7:42 a.m. – Jade Gu, Yardley, Pa.; Lauren Pham, Las Vegas, Nev.; Hannah Harrison, Granite Bay, Calif.

1:22 p.m. / 7:52 a.m. – Claire Swathwood, Carmel, Ind.; Chloe Holder, Anderson, S.C.; Olivia Yun, Carlsbad, Calif.

1:33 p.m. / 8:03 a.m. – Jacee Fields, Fort Worth, Texas; Taylor Riley, San Diego, Calif.; Katelyn Lehigh, Loveland, Colo.

1:43 p.m. / 8:13 a.m. – Catherine Rao, Camarillo, Calif.; Shannyn Vogler, Moline, Ill.; Tatum Walsh, Midlothian, Va.

1:54 p.m. / 8:24 a.m. – Madison Spiess, New Albany, Ohio; Maria Jose Marin Negrete, Colombia; Caris Kim, Los Altos, Calif.

2:04 p.m. / 8:34 a.m. – Mckenzi Hall, Las Vegas, Nev.; Catherine Nekola, St. Charles, Ill.; Mallorie Luitwieler, Katy, Texas

2:15 p.m. / 8:45 a.m. – Kelly Xu, Claremont, Calif.; Hailey Han, Duluth, Ga.; Kendall Jackson, Houston, Texas

2:25 p.m. / 8:55 a.m. – Molly Smith, Westford, Mass.; Lauren Kim, Canada; Kynadie Adams, Nashville, Tenn.

2:36 p.m. / 9:06 a.m. – Kaitlyn Schroeder, Jacksonville, Fla.; Sydney Roberts, Spartanburg, S.C.; Dianna Lee, San Diego, Calif.

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