Gutter Cleaning in
Hanahan SC

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The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in Hanahan, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in Hanahan.

Service Areas

Gutter Cleaning in Hanahan, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

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Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

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Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

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Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

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Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in Hanahan for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in Hanahan, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

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Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

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Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

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Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

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Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in Hanahan, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

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At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in Hanahan, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in Hanahan:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in Hanahan. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
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Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in Hanahan, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in Hanahan, SC:

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Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
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Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
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Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
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Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
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Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
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Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in Hanahan

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in Hanahan. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

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Latest News in Hanahan

North Charleston All-stars clinch Dixie Ponytails district title

The North Charleston All-stars defeated Hanahan, 4-1, to clinch the 2021 S.C. Dixie Softball Ponytails (ages 11-12) District 6 championship on June 18.All-star teams representing Moncks Corner, Goose Creek, Hanahan and North Charleston competed in the district tournament June 14-18 at the Wescott Park ball fields. North Charleston advanced to the final of the double elimination tournament undefeated. After losing on opening day, Hanahan battled back by defeating Moncks Corner on the second day and Goose Creek the third to advance to t...

The North Charleston All-stars defeated Hanahan, 4-1, to clinch the 2021 S.C. Dixie Softball Ponytails (ages 11-12) District 6 championship on June 18.

All-star teams representing Moncks Corner, Goose Creek, Hanahan and North Charleston competed in the district tournament June 14-18 at the Wescott Park ball fields. North Charleston advanced to the final of the double elimination tournament undefeated. After losing on opening day, Hanahan battled back by defeating Moncks Corner on the second day and Goose Creek the third to advance to the final.

“We faced great competition, but we just played lights out,” North Charleston manager Joe Brinson said. “I’m so proud of these girls. In the first game against Hanahan we were up and down until we tied it up and then in the last inning we came through strong with a couple of hits to score the winning run.”

In the title game, Hanahan went up by a run in the top of the first inning. North Charleston answered in the bottom of the frame with three straight hits off the bats of Lennea Morlando, Morgan Carter and Lily Brinson to bring Morlando home, and an RBI single from Kamryn Wickersham that plated Carter.

After her team gained the 2-1 lead, Brinson found her grove in the circle and North Charleston played strong defense the remaining innings.

North Charleston added a run in the second. Alyssa Owens received a base on balls and then scored off a hit by Elizabeth Martray. The final run came in the fourth when Kamari Davis stole home for the 4-1 North Charleston lead.

Ja’Niyah Ray, Ava Harkleroad, Kalynn Butler and Kylie Leon-Jennings are the other members of the District 6 championship team. Chris Carter and Tim Harkleroad are the team’s assistant coaches.

The all-stars advance to the Ponytails State Tournament next month in Johnsonville. Joe Brinson is hoping pitching depth will give them an edge there.

“We have several pitchers this year, which is great,” he said. “We can just let a girl take it and see how far she can go knowing if we need it we have someone else who can step up and finish.”

Wescott Park is also hosting this summer’s Dixie Youth Baseball AAA Minors (9-10) tournament June 17-22. The tournament features teams from North Charleston, Summerville, Moncks Corner, Hanahan, Goose Creek, St. Andrews and Mount Pleasant.

Editorial: Sea level rise, growing population put groundwater at risk. SC must prepare.

It’s an established fact that rising sea levels will affect the supply of fresh groundwater along the South Carolina coast — it already has, especially in some shallower, private wells east of U.S. Highway 17.What’s less clear is how close the state is to a dangerous tipping point, where many of its underground aquifers — empty spaces and cracks deep in the soil and above impermeable layers of rock — will become so tainted with intruding salt that they no longer can serve as sources of drinking water with...

It’s an established fact that rising sea levels will affect the supply of fresh groundwater along the South Carolina coast — it already has, especially in some shallower, private wells east of U.S. Highway 17.

What’s less clear is how close the state is to a dangerous tipping point, where many of its underground aquifers — empty spaces and cracks deep in the soil and above impermeable layers of rock — will become so tainted with intruding salt that they no longer can serve as sources of drinking water without expensive treatment.

As Chloe Johnson reports today, utilities on and around Hilton Head Island already are grappling with the intrusion of salt into their aquifer, and one has taken the novel step of injecting a few hundred million gallons of fresh water from the Savannah River into the ground to help meet its peak demands. Combatting the problem has required utilities in Beaufort County to make other expensive, long-term plans beyond pumping in river water. Some have drilled ever deeper into the Middle Floridan aquifer, whose water is lightly salty and needs filtering through a reverse osmosis plant. One has even sunk a costly well almost 4,000 feet into a 65-million-year-old underground layer to shoot 118-degree water to the surface.

Charleston is not immune from the growing threat to our aquifers.

It’s true that our region currently gets most of its drinking water from the surface, including reservoirs fed by freshwater rivers flowing toward the coast. But Mount Pleasant and a few smaller beach communities have wells from which they draw water from the Middendorf Aquifer. When those wells prove problematic, they have to buy more water from the Charleston Water System, which currently uses only about two-thirds of the 115 million gallons a day its Hanahan Treatment Plant can produce.

“Fortunately, we have ample capacity right now, though we continue to monitor that very closely,” Kin Hill, the water system CEO, said. Still, “we have to stay a decade or so ahead of the demand. You can’t be caught short when Mother Nature delivers something to you.”

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Mount Pleasant is appropriately concerned enough about the situation that it engaged in a high-stakes battle with state regulators and Google over the company’s request to pump up to 549 million gallons of water per year from an aquifer to cool the servers at its Berkeley County data center.

The agency in charge of regulating South Carolina’s groundwater supplies, the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control, has had a study in the works on how ocean salt will continue to permeate underground supplies in Beaufort County, including a mathematical model that would predict how much salt intrusion would occur with different levels of rising seas. It’s expected to release a paper soon that projects salt migration in the coming decades, though no release date is set. We urge the agency to finish its review and make it public soon. There’s little time to waste, especially given the long lead times utilities need to plan, finance and build.

The strain on coastal aquifers comes from more than the salt and rising seas; the coastal population boom also puts more demands on withdrawing water. If too much is taken out, a utility can create a so-called “cone of depression,” or lower groundwater level, that poses a different type of problem. Fortunately, Beaufort utility managers have taken commonsense steps to reduce demand, including using treated wastewater to irrigate golf courses. But coastal utilities must continue to press for water conservation as a key piece in solving this puzzle — and all of us need to start giving more thought to how we use this precious resource.

The problem is going to become more challenging, especially with seas projected to rise by 1-4 feet by the end of the century. It’s something that eventually will affect us all, yet as hydrogeologist Chris Foldesi told Ms. Johnson: “I rarely hear folks talking about (sea level rise) in terms of water withdrawal planning and those types of things.”

The sooner we understand and make better plans for those effects, the less chance we will leave future generations high and dry — or too salty.

2021 Minor League Baseball Rosters

Triple-A EastRyan Additon, Sunrise, Fla. David Arrieta Quintero, Orlando, Fla. Erich Bacchus, Frederick, Md. John Bacon, Kent, Ohio Brock Ballou, Mount Juliet, Tenn. Sean Barber, Lakeland, Fla. Matthew Bates, Harrison, Tenn. Adam Beck, Oviedo, Fla. Nestor Ceja, The Woodlands, Texas William Clark, Myrtle Beach, S.C. Paul Clemons, Oxford, Kan. Travis Godec, Roanoke, Va. Richard Grassa, Lindenhurst, N.Y. Thomas Hanahan, Mentor, Ohio Shane Livensparger, Jacksonville Beach, Fla. Alexander Mackay, Evergreen, Colo. John Mang, Youngstown, O...

Triple-A East

Ryan Additon, Sunrise, Fla. David Arrieta Quintero, Orlando, Fla. Erich Bacchus, Frederick, Md. John Bacon, Kent, Ohio Brock Ballou, Mount Juliet, Tenn. Sean Barber, Lakeland, Fla. Matthew Bates, Harrison, Tenn. Adam Beck, Oviedo, Fla. Nestor Ceja, The Woodlands, Texas William Clark, Myrtle Beach, S.C. Paul Clemons, Oxford, Kan. Travis Godec, Roanoke, Va. Richard Grassa, Lindenhurst, N.Y. Thomas Hanahan, Mentor, Ohio Shane Livensparger, Jacksonville Beach, Fla. Alexander Mackay, Evergreen, Colo. John Mang, Youngstown, Ohio Christopher Marco, Waterdown, Ontario David Martinez, Bayonne, N.J. Jose Matamoros, Menomonee Falls, Wis. Takahito Matsuda, Hamilton, Ontario Daniel Merzel, Apex, N.C. Jacob Metz, Edmonds, Wash. Brennan Miller, Fairfax Station, Va. Jose Navas Corzo, Los Guayos, Venezuela Cody Oakes, Oelwein, Iowa Roberto Ortiz, Kissimmee, Fla. Jonathan Parra Ortega, Valencia, Venezuela Charles Ramos, Grand Rapids, Mich. Jeremy Riggs, Portsmouth, Va. Richard Riley, Alexandria, Va. Randy Rosenberg, Jacksonville, Fla. Sean Ryan, Waunakee, Wis. Michael Savakinas II, Fairborn, Ohio Sean Shafer-Markle, Grand Rapids, Mich.

Triple-A West

Sean Allen, Fresno, Calif. Derek Eaton, Tracy, Calif. Reid Gibbs, Glendale, Ariz. Clayton Hamm, Austin, Texas Aaron Higgins, Elk Grove, Calif. John Libka, Port Huron, Mich. Nicholas Mahrley, Phoenix Benjamin May, Milwaukee Kyle McCrady, Longview, Wash. Malachi Moore, Buckeye, Ariz. Edwin Corredor Moscoso, La Morita, Venezuela Tyler Olson, Overland Park, Kan. Anthony Perez, Murrells Inlet, S.C. Justin Robinson, St. Louis Jason Starkovich, San Tan Valley, Ariz. Nathan Tomlinson, Douglas, Wyo. Brian Walsh, Long Beach, Calif. Lewis Williams III, Lodi, Calif. Thomas Woodring, Las Vegas

Double-A Northeast

Marcelo Alfonzo Lozano, Los Guayos, Venezuela Jhonatan Biarreta Castillo, Barquisimeto, Venezuela Donald Carlyon, Drums, Pa. Thomas Fornarola, Rochester, N.Y. Steven Hodgins, Keego Harbor, Mich. Steven Jaschinski, Mount Hope, Ontario Emil Jimenez Pernalete, Coro, Venezuela Jude Koury, Youngstown, Ohio Lucas Krupa, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. Tanner Moore, Omaha, Neb. Kyle Nichol, Moseley, Va. Taylor Payne, Platte City, Mo. Benjamin Phillips, Apex, N.C. Dane Poncsak, Columbus, Ohio Benjamin Rosen, Thornhill, Ontario Michael Snover, Myrtle Beach, S.C. Kelvis Velez Caminero, Ensenada, Puerto Rico Thomas West, Boondall, Australia

Double-A South

Alan Basner, Lawrenceville, Ga. Mark Bass, Madisonville, La. Jonathon Benken, Lilburn, Ga. Matthew Brown, Charlotte, N.C. Samuel Burch, Clearwater, Fla. Austin Jones, Fayetteville, N.C. Tyler Jones, Charleston, S.C. Garry Kelley, Fayetteville, Ga. Robert Nunez, Largo, Fla. Mark Stewart Jr., Royal Palm Beach, Fla. Justin Whiddon, Richmond Hill, Ga. Dillon Wilson, Clopton, Ala.

Dylan Bradley, Pace, Fla. Sean Cassidy, Jupiter, Fla. Adam Clark, Huntsville, Ala. Joshua Gilreath, Buford, Ga. James Jean, Lake Park, Fla. Edwin Jimenez, Pernalete, Venezuela Evin Johnson, Myrtle Beach, S.C. Mitchell Leikam, Fort Belvoir, Va. Jose Lozada Bermudez, Las Piedras, Puerto Rico Adam Pierce, Ayden, N.C. Clay Williams, Springfield, Tenn. Tyler Witte, Pearl River, N Y.

Nathaniel Diederich, Victorville, Calif. Jaeyoung Kim, Gyeonggi-Do, South Korea Kevin Mandzuk, Regina, Saskatchewan Raymond Patchen, Oceanside, Calif. Ernesto Rios Jr., El Paso, Texas Pete Talkington, Bellevue, Neb.

High-A Central

Emma Charlesworth-Seiler, Golden Valley, Minn. Anthony Choc, St. Louis Benjamin Engstrand, Cumming, Iowa Jeffrey Hamann, Fargo, N.D. Justin Juska, Chicago Kevin Levine, Sawyer, Mich. Thomas O’Neil, Versailles, Ky. Jen Pawol, Decatur, Ill. Cliburn Rondon Romero, Guatire, Venezuela Kyle Stutz, Leander, Texas Robert Tassone, Somonauk, Ill. Mitchell Trzeciak, Lansing, Mich. Bryan Van Vranken, Sarasota, Fla.

Low-A East

Joseph Belangia III, Greenville, S.C. Matthew Blackborow, Stoney Creek, Ontario Jesse Bush, Ballston Spa, N.Y. Steven Craze, Silver Spring, Md. Kenneth Cullipher, Greenville, N.C. Ethan Gorsak, Toms River, N.J. Macon Hammond, Greenville, N.C. Tre Jester, Atlanta Jarred Moehlmann, Brenham, Texas Christian Roemer, Finksburg, Md. Ryne Sigmon, Danville, Va. Zdenek Zidek, Zruc-Senec, Czech Republic

Low-A Southeast

Kaleb Devier, Newton, Ala. Chandler Durham, Midland, Ga. Kenneth Jackson, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Casey James, Atlanta Trevor Mathews, Venice, Fla. Joseph McCarthy, Destrehan, La. Austin Nelson, Omaha, Neb. Jon-Tyler Shaw, Conyers, Ga. Malcolm Smith, Bartlett, Tenn. Rainiero Valero Bolivar, Puerto Cabello, Venezuela

Low-A West

Luis Avalos Varela, Nuevo Casas Grandes, Mexico Hector Cuellar Jr., Camarillo, Calif. Larry Dillman Jr., Menifee, Calif. Shin Koishizawa, Koshu, Japan Kellen Martin, Moscow, Idaho Glen Meyerhofer, Kaukauna, Wis. Guillermo Rodriguez, Princeton, Calif. William Traynor, Manteca, Calif.

Note: This article is archival in nature. Rules, interpretations, mechanics, philosophies and other information may or may not be correct for the current year.

This article is the copyright of ©Referee Enterprises, Inc., and may not be republished in whole or in part online, in print or in any capacity without expressed written permission from Referee. The article is made available for educational use by individuals.

Winner of 2021 Miss SC Teen pageant is crowned in Columbia. Here’s who won

Dabria Aguilar is the new Miss South Carolina Teen.She was crowned Friday night at a packed Township Auditorium by Miss South Carolina Teen Kellan Fenegan 2019, who represented Columbia. Fenegan served for two years because COVID caused the 2020 contest to be canceled.At the start of the show, 15 contestants were selected by the judges as semi-finalists from the 35 competing. Piedmont Teen Piper Holt joined the group as the People’s Choice winner based on online votes.Judges selected the top 10 after the fitness co...

Dabria Aguilar is the new Miss South Carolina Teen.

She was crowned Friday night at a packed Township Auditorium by Miss South Carolina Teen Kellan Fenegan 2019, who represented Columbia. Fenegan served for two years because COVID caused the 2020 contest to be canceled.

At the start of the show, 15 contestants were selected by the judges as semi-finalists from the 35 competing. Piedmont Teen Piper Holt joined the group as the People’s Choice winner based on online votes.

Judges selected the top 10 after the fitness competition, and after talent performances, the top five were announced.

First runner up was Georgetown County Teen Hannah Young, second runner up Clemson Teen Reilly Ray, third runner up Greer High Teen Ella Kate Brannon and fourth runner up Spartanburg Teen Messiah Moring.

Aguilar, 17, performed a contemporary ballet and also had the highest talent score of all the contestants. She is from Hanahan and attends Hanahan High School.

Aguilar wants to focus on special education. She said she hopes to visit every special education classroom in the state to help enhance students’ self confidence and self love.

Aguilar will go to the Miss Outstanding Teen competition in Orlando, which begins with preliminary competitions July 28.

Winners in the three nights of preliminary competitions were Aguilar, Dorchester County Teen Muskaan Makkar, Clarendon County Teen Nicole Herrera, Clemson Teen Reilly Ray, Georgetown County Teen Hannah Young and Spartanburg Teen Messiah Moring.

Fenegen, who graduated this year from high school, will enroll at Clemson University in August and plans to study genetics. She said in an interview on the Jack and Megan show last fall she may decide to compete in the Miss South Carolina pageant. She was in the top 10 at Miss Outstanding Teen and had the highest GPA. She began her involvement with Miss South Carolina as a princess.

As Miss South Carolina Teen, Fenegen spent the past two years working to provide needed items for kids in foster care through her Kellan’s Kloset organization. She announced Friday night that the organization has now gone international. It is in 14 state and Three countries., she said.

“I wouldn’t have had the courage without the Miss South Carolina organization,” she said. “I am incredibly grateful.”

The other in the Top 10 were Florence Teen Alexandra Hamilton, Green Wave Teen Ansley Cook, Piedmont Teen Piper Holt, South Florence High School Teen Constance Mixon, Upstate Teen Belle Pitts.

Semi-finalists in the Top 16 included Clarendon Teen Nicole Herrera, Dorchester County Teen, Muskaan Makkar, Garden City Teen Ashley O’Connor, Inman Teen Emma Cook, Palmetto Teen Abby Scruggs, Greater Greer Teen Kelsey Pranke.

Next up is crowning a new Miss South Carolina. That program begins at 8 p.m. Saturday at Township Auditorium and will be televised by WACH Fox television station in Columbia and other Sinclair stations around the state. Those are WCIV in Charleston, WPDE in Florence-Myrtle Beach and WLOS in Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson.

The Miss SC finale also will be live streamed on the Miss South Carolina website at a cost of $29.95.

Miss South Carolina 2019 Morgan Nichols served for two years and plans to attend Johns Hopkins University to earn master’s degrees in biotechnology and business. She was a genetics major at Clemson University.

Her platform was to further STEM education in South Carolina. STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and math.

Preliminary winners for Miss South Carolina are Miss Clemson Anna Newton, Miss Greater Greer Jada Samuel, Miss Lander University Kara Love, Miss Midlands Emily Wakeman and Miss Sparkle City C.J. McDermott.

Newton won for her talent and evening wear/social impact statement, which is connecting first responders with community members to learn their needs.

Fifteen finalists and one People’s Choice winner will be announced Saturday to compete during the program.

Miss South Carolina 2021 will go to the Miss America competition in December in Connecticut.

Leaders break ground on new 53-acre park in Hanahan

HANAHAN, S.C. (WCBD) – A new multi-use park is being constructed in Hanahan. It comes after more than 75% of voters approved a bond referendum for the project back in November.The brand new 53-acre park is located next to Bowen’s Corner Elementary and will serve several purposes in the Hanahan community.“We are just so excited about this new park,” said Hanahan Mayor Christie Rainwater. “When the federal government partnered with us and donated the land, it had to be used for parks and rec. It was ...

HANAHAN, S.C. (WCBD) – A new multi-use park is being constructed in Hanahan. It comes after more than 75% of voters approved a bond referendum for the project back in November.

The brand new 53-acre park is located next to Bowen’s Corner Elementary and will serve several purposes in the Hanahan community.

“We are just so excited about this new park,” said Hanahan Mayor Christie Rainwater. “When the federal government partnered with us and donated the land, it had to be used for parks and rec. It was exactly what the city of Hanahan needed.”

The last time Hanahan opened new ballfields there were only 13,700 people in the town. Now, about 29,000 call Hanahan home.

“There will be tennis courts, an artificial turf field, ballfields, a dog park, fishing pond, picnic spaces – you name it,” said Mayor Rainwater. “Everything that you would love to see in a park will be here.”

The project will cost more than $11 million. The Berkeley County School District agreed to pay nearly $1 million for artificial turf on a field so that it could be used as a practice field.

“We will partner with them to make sure they now have the things they need to play their sports,” the mayor said.

Berkeley County Supervisor Johnny Cribb said Hanahan has been working on the project for some time, even during the full ten years he was town administrator.

“It’s critical because it’s a quality-of-life project,” he said. “If you’re going to be a vibrant city, a vibrant community, people are looking for parks and recreation- do you want to draw in young families, do you want to be able to keep the families that you’ve drawn in?”

Bryce Florie grew up in Hanahan and has coached kids in the area, He said this is a great project.

“Just the way the community has grown and the need for it- it’s so important and the way the city came together… it’s a good place for everyone,” he said.

Mayor Rainwater hopes to have the park finished a year from now. The park has not yet been named.

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