Gutter Cleaning in
James Island SC

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The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in James Island, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in James Island.

Service Areas

Gutter Cleaning in James Island, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

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Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

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Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

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Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

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Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in James Island for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in James Island, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

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Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

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Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

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Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

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Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in James Island, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

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At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in James Island, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in James Island:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in James Island. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
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Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in James Island, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in James Island, SC:

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Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
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Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
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Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
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Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
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Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
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Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in James Island

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in James Island. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

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Latest News in James Island

Editorial: We know what’s polluting James Island Creek. Now we need to fix it.

We finally know the main source of pollution that’s fouling James Island Creek: It’s not coming from Charleston’s Plum Island sewer treatment plant or from pet waste or even from wild animals but from the many faulty septic tanks along the creek banks. Now it’s time to address the problem and restore the health of the scenic creek.The work won’t be quick or cheap; it will take years and likely cost several million dollars. But it’s necessary, and we’re encouraged that local and state officials...

We finally know the main source of pollution that’s fouling James Island Creek: It’s not coming from Charleston’s Plum Island sewer treatment plant or from pet waste or even from wild animals but from the many faulty septic tanks along the creek banks. Now it’s time to address the problem and restore the health of the scenic creek.

The work won’t be quick or cheap; it will take years and likely cost several million dollars. But it’s necessary, and we’re encouraged that local and state officials say they are more focused on getting it done. We urge residents of James Island and beyond to hold them to their word.

The nonprofit Charleston Waterkeeper has done tests for bacteria counts in the creek for nine years to sound an alarm about the ongoing contamination. Last year, several local governments formed a task force to tackle the problem. That has led to a new watershed management plan, already approved by the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control, that offers a detailed picture regarding the sources of pollution and the actions necessary to improve water quality.

Adopting that plan would be a small but important first step for the city of Charleston, the town of James Island, the James Island Public Service District and Charleston County. Their support will be crucial to seeking grants and raising other funds to get more homes off septic tanks and hooked up to sewer lines. Other key actions include promoting the proper maintenance of septic tanks in the interim, as well as studying the island’s sewer lines to ensure they’re not part of the problem.

“My read is the public in and around James Island Creek is in a place where they’re looking for action,” said Charleston Waterkeeper executive director Andrew Wunderley, who is part of the task force. “I think what the public really wants to see is here’s something we’re doing to reduce the bacteria discharges into James Island Creek. And here’s another thing we’re doing. And here’s a third thing we’re doing.”

Aside from the major infrastructure work, the new plan also mentions more modest steps, such as pet waste management programs, educational campaigns and incentives to reduce paving on residential and commercial properties along the creek.

These deserve to be explored to see if their potential payoff would be worth their more nominal costs.

Charleston City Councilman Ross Appel said elected officials ultimately must find a way to raise the necessary money to do the larger work on septic tanks and sewer lines. “At the end of the day, I see this, at its core, as just as much of a public infrastructure issue as our stormwater system and roads.”

To that end, the task force leaders need to think beyond the design of specific projects and figure out how those projects might be paid for and how much affected homeowners ultimately will be expected to pay to hook into the new systems and pay their monthly sewer bills.

DHEC rewrote its regulations this year to give a more accurate picture for those who swim, kayak and fish in our waterways. Its change held all recreational saltwater bodies to the same standard for bacteria counts, so Shem and James Island creeks no longer were deemed OK even if they had 80% more bacteria than other bodies of water, such as the Ashley River.

That was a positive step. The new study pinpointing the pollution problem in James Island Creek is another one. We now know the problem and how to address it, so it’s time to do just that.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Charleston area’s Sisters of Charity to move again, hope to continue mission of service

JAMES ISLAND — The Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy will soon relocate from the 23-acre waterfront site on Fort Johnson Road to the Bishop Gadsden retirement community, marking the close of one chapter and the start of another.Though the sisters are older — the youngest of the 12 nuns is 71 years old — they still intend to continue the work of ministry, with plans to meet regularly and offer prayers for residents at the retirement community.“In a sense, we’re taking our ministry to Bishop Ga...

JAMES ISLAND — The Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy will soon relocate from the 23-acre waterfront site on Fort Johnson Road to the Bishop Gadsden retirement community, marking the close of one chapter and the start of another.

Though the sisters are older — the youngest of the 12 nuns is 71 years old — they still intend to continue the work of ministry, with plans to meet regularly and offer prayers for residents at the retirement community.

“In a sense, we’re taking our ministry to Bishop Gadsden as well,” said Sister Mary Joseph Ritter, general superior for the Sisters of Charity.

Founded in 1829 by Bishop England, the first bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston, Sisters of Charity have a long legacy of serving those in need.

The century that followed involved service in areas of education and health care. This included the opening of an orphanage in 1834, a free school for girls in 1839 and a free school for children of color in 1841.

Amid the Civil War, the religious women nursed injured soldiers. The nuns split into two groups. One group helped staff a Confederate hospital in Virginia while another stayed in Charleston.

Like elsewhere in the region, the ministry would suffer property damage as a result of the war.

In 1871, Congress appropriated $12,000 for the restoration of the girls orphanage destroyed during combat.

Through the 19th and 20th centuries, the order of Our Lady of Mercy opened a hospital, the Neighborhood House on the East Side and and outreach center on James Island.

What stands out the most about the order’s history is how the group has often relocated to better serve the community, Ritter said. The first transition occurred in 1834, when the sisters moved to a larger house on Beaufain Street to establish an orphanage.

“Leaving (Fort Johnson Road) is very difficult, but it’s not unusual,” Ritter said. “We have frequently left our place to go somewhere else.”

The move highlights the general trend of religious orders struggling to attract new members to maintain their large properties.

Mepkin Abbey, a 3,000-acre monastery in Moncks Corner, is one of 17 Trappist monasteries in the country.

The Rev. Joseph A. Tedesco, superior at Mepkin, said the monks have dealt with similar challenges, though the group has been successful in attracting younger members.

The Mepkin group consists of 14 total monks ages 25 to 96.

“The culture that we live in is not really supporting (the monastery) life as it used to,” Tedesco said. “There are young men who are interested in that life. We are receiving some of them. We have hope for the future.”

The sisters’ work will continue by supporting existing ministries, like the order’s Johns Island outreach center and downtown Charleston’s Neighborhood House. The group will also offer educational scholarships for students. The sisters plan to discuss ways in which they can serve the area’s homelessness community.

Though the Sisters of Charity hasn’t been able to attract younger women, Ritter said the legacy of the order will live on through the volunteers who’ve long worked with the organization.

“All of those people who work with us in ministry, they are the ones who will carry on our ministry,” she said.

New taxing district aims to boost Johns Island infrastructure funds

On Johns Island, longtime residents’ complicated relationship with change is nothing new.Devonne Hammond, manager of Fields Farm Market on River Road, said growth on the historically rural island feels inevitable. Hammond grew up on his family’s 40-acre farm and moved away for college but eventually found his way back to an island that looked different than the one of his youth.“I don’t know if I can reasonably think of any place where growth doesn’t mean change for some people,” Hammond said...

On Johns Island, longtime residents’ complicated relationship with change is nothing new.

Devonne Hammond, manager of Fields Farm Market on River Road, said growth on the historically rural island feels inevitable. Hammond grew up on his family’s 40-acre farm and moved away for college but eventually found his way back to an island that looked different than the one of his youth.

“I don’t know if I can reasonably think of any place where growth doesn’t mean change for some people,” Hammond said. “I just hope it doesn’t have as much of a negative impact on our residents as we might expect.”

The farm has been in his family since Reconstruction, when formerly enslaved laborers took over former plantations on Johns Island.

“Its not until you move away that you see everything people go through to attain what my family already has,” Hammond said.

From 2010 to 2020, census data shows the island’s population within Charleston city limits doubled from nearly 5,300 residents to almost 12,000.

A new taxing district established by the city of Charleston aims to use funding from the island’s commercial and residential growth to help ease its growing pains like lagging road and drainage infrastructure.

The district, approved by City Council Oct. 12, places a tax on new development on the part of the island that falls within Charleston city limits to help fund municipal projects. It doesn’t apply to any existing developments or developments that were in the permitting process at the time of the council vote.

“Folks view development on the island as coming before the infrastructure,” said John Zlogar, chairman of the Johns Island Task Force. The task force was established in 2013 to bring together residents and local officials to address Johns Island-specific issues.

At one point, City Council considered a six-month moratorium on new housing on Johns Island proposed by Mayor John Tecklenburg. He advocated for the proposal as a way for the city to catch up on long-needed infrastructure improvements. After a mixed response, the 2018 proposal failed.

Over its 30-year lifespan, the newly approved taxing district, known as a Municipal Improvement District or MID, is projected to generate $60 million of additional revenue specifically for Johns Island, consultants hired by the city estimate. Developers will pay $480 per year per new apartment unit or single-family home. New individual single-family homes that are not part of subdivision will only be subject to the $480 per year tax if they are on properties over 2-acres. New commercial business owners will pay an equivalent tax based on the size of the property. A 10,000-square-foot commercial space would pay about $2,600 per year, city planning department officials estimate. The tax will increase by 2 percent each year.

As a lifelong resident of the island and new business owner, Estuary Beans & Barley brewery owner Scott Harrison said he is concerned about the potential burden the MID may place on new businesses. His brewery on Meek’s Farm Road is located on the same lot as the new Charleston Distilling, which relocated from King Street in November.

“It takes a long time to open up a business here and it takes a long time to get the approvals,” he said. “I am sure things at the city are backed up, but especially with COVID-19, time is important.”

Harrison opened his brewery in 2020, so he won’t be subject to the new tax, but he wants the city to encourage new development as long as it respects the island’s agricultural roots.

“We have a farm-to-table kind of feel out here that Johns Island has always been known for,” he said. “On the one hand, I would hate to see the farms go away, but it would be nice if city planning helped growth happen the way it does in the rest of Charleston.”

Charleston County’s Urban Growth Boundary limits dense development on much of the island outside of Charleston city limits, which has helped preserve farmland in the area.

Zlogar, the Johns Island task force chair, said he could see the MID benefiting efforts to balance urban development and rural preservation. With new funding sources, the city could buy land for park space or conservation areas to create a buffer between the urban growth boundary and the rest of the island where more development will take place.

“It’s all about community, how do you use these funds to bring the community together,” he said.

Along with the Johns Island Task Force, other community groups have endorsed the MID, including the Johns Island Council and the Johns Island Community Association.

Councilman Karl Brady Jr., who represents Charleston’s portion of Johns Island, said he pursued the MID designation because many proposed improvements on the island struggle to receive sufficient funding.

“Improvements are coming, but I’m sure it’s not as fast as some people would like,” Brady said. “This will give us the ability to do some homegrown improvements like the Johns Island Park expansion and road and infrastructure projects.”

Johns Island is the first area of the city to get a MID, mainly because it has the most potential for new development, Charleston Planning Director Robert Summerfield said.

“Johns Island has quite a bit of future development, unlike West Ashley or the peninsula where most of the development will be redevelopment,” he said.

The district will likely not create significant revenue for at least three years, Summerfield said. However, once revenue is generated, the city may be able issue bonds with it to jumpstart its use.

Transportation improvements in particular are crucial, said Michael Johnson, president of the Headquarters Island Property Owners Association on Johns Island. Johnson grew up on Johns Island and returned after stints in Houston and New Orleans.

“Charleston has become one of the most unsustainable places I’ve visited in a long time,” he said. “The traffic is horrendous.”

Not all proposed road projects are popular. An ongoing plan to extend Interstate 526 from West Ashley through James and Johns Island is seen by some as a threat to Johns Island’s Gullah-Geechee heritage. That plan is largely funded by the S.C. Department of Transportation and Charleston County and will not likely be impacted by the MID.

Residents of Johns Island are likely years away from seeing improvements funded with MID dollars, but the development will continue.

Census surprises: Some SC cities have thousands fewer residents than thought

For years, Hanahan appeared to be a growth hot spot in South Carolina, with the Census Bureau estimating the city had the most rapid population gains in the Charleston metropolitan area.Then the 2020 census results came out, and local officials were stunned.Instead of the estimated 28,280 residents in Hanahan, the 2020 census found just 20,325. The difference — as if more than a quarter of the city’s residents suddenly vanished — will impact Hanahan’s state funding and budget for years to come.Acr...

For years, Hanahan appeared to be a growth hot spot in South Carolina, with the Census Bureau estimating the city had the most rapid population gains in the Charleston metropolitan area.

Then the 2020 census results came out, and local officials were stunned.

Instead of the estimated 28,280 residents in Hanahan, the 2020 census found just 20,325. The difference — as if more than a quarter of the city’s residents suddenly vanished — will impact Hanahan’s state funding and budget for years to come.

Across South Carolina, the decennial census found that a number of towns and cities had populations much smaller, or larger, than had been thought. Charleston, for example, turned out to have 150,227 residents in 2020, not 139,714 as the Census Bureau had estimated.

The Census Bureau says, in cases where that happens, it’s the estimates that were wrong, but Hanahan City Administrator Mike Cochran is among those who disagree.

“When we first saw the number a few weeks ago, I said there’s no way that could be correct,” Cochran said. “We didn’t saw off half the city.”

Cochran looks at all the new homes and apartments, the building permits issued, the record number of children in the fall sports program and other statistics, and believes the 2020 census number is far too low.

Located between North Charleston and Goose Creek, Hanahan’s population jumped by 39 percent from 2000 to 2010. In the following decade, it grew 12.9 percent, according to the 2020 census, which is faster than the state’s total population grew but much less than roughly 50 percent growth that had been estimated.

One result is that Hanahan will get a considerably smaller share of state funding, which is based on population, starting this month. Another will be constraints on the city’s taxing and borrowing ability, which are also linked to population growth.

“We’ve grown exponentially over the last decade, but the things we get that are tied to the census have not,” Cochran said.

Growing populations come with demands for more public services, and the census counts are tied to a number of state and federal streams of revenue. State aid is directly tied to population growth rates, with towns and cities that grow most quickly getting more help paying for the costs of growth.

Winners, losers

Financially, the gap between estimates and the 2020 census has cut both ways, because towns and cities received American Rescue Plan Act money based on estimated population, but will receive state aid to subdivisions for the next decade based on the 2020 census.

So, Hanahan got far more ARPA money than the official census count would have supported but will get less state aid than expected for years to come.

In the small town of Lincolnville, near Summerville, Mayor Charles Duberry said he first learned of the official census number from a Post and Courier reporter in October, and he was shocked. The town had been estimated to have about 2,500 residents, but the official count was 1,147 — just eight more than in 2010.

“We’ve had so many people move in,” said Duberry, ticking off a list of new housing and apartment developments. “Since I took office in 2014, Lincolnville has grown tremendously.”

He said it’s possible that many residents did not fill out their census forms, amid the pandemic.

The town of Edisto Beach has fewer full-time residents than Lincolnville, but turned out to have 157 percent more than the Census Bureau had estimated; 1,033 instead of 402.

Town Administrator Iris Hill was pleasantly surprised. Not because the official number seems too high — the town does have more than 900 registered voters — but because the estimate had been so low.

“I wonder why we didn’t get ARPA money based on the 1,033,” she said.

The answer to that is, the ARPA money went out before the official census numbers were available. The town’s jump in population, 619 more residents than in 2010, will mean more state aid through 2030.

Hill said Edisto Beach received $212,000 in ARPA funds, but would have received far more if the towns’ estimated population had been on target.

As in Edisto Beach, Charleston officials weren’t surprised by the official census count, because it was closer to what they expected than were the estimates.

“Most of that estimate is based on housing unit counts,” said Phillip Overcash, the city’s senior planner. “Obviously, we know a good bit about that, because we are the ones permitting them.”

The city had estimated it would have 156,000 residents in 2020. The Census Bureau estimated 139,714, and the 2020 census found 150,227.

The official count cements Charleston’s title as South Carolina’s largest city. Charleston’s population narrowly overtook Columbia’s in 2016, by 213 residents, and now the gap is 13,595.

“There’s lots of residential (growth) downtown, but West Ashley has also continued to develop, James Island has seen some infill, and Johns Island and Cainhoy are, of course, growing,” said Christopher Morgan, director of Charleston’s Planning Division.

Screaming from rooftops

While a number of towns and cities had sizable differences between the estimated and official population counts, none came close to the gap seen in Hanahan, with 7,955 fewer residents than expected.

Berkeley County Supervisor Johnny Cribb was previously Hanahan’s city administrator, and said “there is no way in the world” the 2020 census number could be correct for that city.

“There are entire communities over there that didn’t exist in 2010, with thousands of people,” he said. “I’d be screaming from the rooftops if I was there.”

Cochran isn’t screaming, but he’s gathering data and looking at options.

“I don’t know the exact method of appeal, but we’ll get to that,” Cochran said.

Unfortunately, there are only limited, specific ways to challenge the results of a census. Local governments can request a review of the 2020 census count, through mid-2023, but reviews focus on municipal boundary lines, and whether there were geographic or processing errors.

For example, if a town can show that a subdivision or apartment complex was mistakenly counted as being in a different town or city, that could change the official count.

“As we understand it, there is no mechanism to say, ‘Hey, you guys were off by half,’” said Scott Slatton, at the Municipal Association of South Carolina.

What towns and cities can do is wait a few years and request a special census, in 2023 or later. A special census is sometimes done when local officials think there’s been significant growth that’s not been accounted for, between decennial censuses.

‘It wasn’t cheap’

A special census isn’t a challenge to the decennial census, but a new census limited to a local area. They are conducted by the Census Bureau at the local government’s expense, and Mount Pleasant did one in the mid-2000s.

The idea is that having a special census, reflecting a fast-growing population, will trigger more funding and more than offset the cost.

In 2005, during Mount Pleasant’s most rapid phase of population growth, the town spent about $750,000 on a special census and expected to get twice that much back in state aid through 2010. Completed in 2006, it found that the town’s population had grown from 47,610 in 2000 to 59,104.

“We were pretty sure — this was a town going through tremendous growth — that we were going to get the money back. I think we got it back in two years,” said Town Administrator Eric DeMoura, who was directly involved in the count.

“It wasn’t cheap, and we had to bring in the Census Bureau,” he said. “I do recall having trouble getting enough workers.”

So, for Hanahan and other places that believe they were undercounted, a special census in 2023 or later would be the next option to consider.

Suzanna Marie Gibbs - David ChristopherDudley

Suzanna Marie Gibbs and David Christopher Dudley were united in marriage at 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 9, in Pulaski Heights United Methodist Church. The Rev. Jay Clark officiated.Ann Marie and James Kenneth Gibbs of Little Rock are the parents of the bride. She is the granddaughter of Roxane and Glen Arnold, the late Judy Arnold and the late Joy and James Kenneth Gibbs.Parents of the groom are Kendall and David Billows of Rome City, Ind., and Debbie and David Dudley of Murrells Inlet, S.C. He is the grandson of Freida and David C. ...

Suzanna Marie Gibbs and David Christopher Dudley were united in marriage at 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 9, in Pulaski Heights United Methodist Church. The Rev. Jay Clark officiated.

Ann Marie and James Kenneth Gibbs of Little Rock are the parents of the bride. She is the granddaughter of Roxane and Glen Arnold, the late Judy Arnold and the late Joy and James Kenneth Gibbs.

Parents of the groom are Kendall and David Billows of Rome City, Ind., and Debbie and David Dudley of Murrells Inlet, S.C. He is the grandson of Freida and David C. Dudley Sr., the late James David Goodson, the late Durie Lee Goodson and the late Betty Jo Elmore Tedder.

The bride, escorted by her father, wore a long sleeve gown by Dany Tabet embellished with pearls and floral appliques. She carried a bouquet of white roses, cattleya orchids and a cascade of dendrobium orchid tendrils.

Gallery: Dudley Gibbs Wedding Reception

The bride's maids of honor were her sisters Stevie Gibbs of Fayetteville and Liza Gibbs of Little Rock. Bridesmaids were London Hall and Ashley Jolly, both of Fayetteville; Hailey Merlo of Austin, Texas; Kelly Richardson of Cincinnati; Julienne Thomas of Little Rock; and Rebecca Roberts of Chicago. They wore black gowns in the style of their choice and carried bouquets similar to the bride's.

Flower girl was Londyn Landers and ring bearers were Patton Landers and Jack Tennyson, all of Little Rock.

Davis Dudley of Cleveland was his brother's best man. Groomsmen were Louis Gattozzi, Will Ripley and John Colla, all of Cleveland; Chad Volz of Louisville, Ky.; Binh Tran of St. Petersburg, Fla.; Dylan Murphy of Sanibel Island, Fla.; and Brandon Hazlewood of Lexington, Ky.

Seating the guests were Charles Walker Daniel of Fayetteville and Malachi Williamson and Eli Williamson, both of Edmund, Okla., and cousins of the bride; and Harris Daniels of Athens, Ga., and Parker Daniels of Atlanta, both cousins of the groom.

A reception was held at Chenal Country Club. Guest tables held a mix of tall and short arrangements of roses, orchids and pampas grass in neutral shades. Tall flowering faux trees were in each corner of the ballroom.

The bride graduated with bachelor's degrees in French and English from the University of Arkansas and is a high school educator at Little Rock Christian Academy.

The groom has a bachelor's degree in architecture from the University of Kentucky and is a financial adviser at PNC Bank.

The couple will make their home in Little Rock after a honeymoon in Belize.

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