Gutter Cleaning in
James Island SC

Ask Us Anything!

843 606 0798

Quick Quote

The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in James Island, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in James Island.

Service Areas

Gutter Cleaning in James Island, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

foundation-damage.jpg

Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

Wood-Damage.jpg

Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

Landscaping-Damage

Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

Gutter-Damage.jpg

Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in James Island for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in James Island, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

Sagging-Gutters-1

Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

Birds-and-Pests-2.png

Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

Stains-on-Your-Siding-1

Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

Plant-Life-1

Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in James Island, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

Gutter-Installation-sc

At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in James Island, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in James Island:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in James Island. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
Gutter-Installation-sc

Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in James Island, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in James Island, SC:

icon-Pooling-Water
Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
icon-Leaks
Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
icon-Displaced-Hardware
Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
mold
Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
iconPeeling-Paint
Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
Uneven-Gutters
Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in James Island

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in James Island. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

Contact Us

Latest News in James Island

SC’s new rules for flounder catch go into effect July 1, as state embarks on a new hatchery

South Carolina has implemented stricter rules on the harvest of flounder, which will go into effect July 1.Populations of summer flounder, a popular fish that spans coastal waters from Georgia to North Carolina, have been in severe decline for decades. The rules are aimed at letting the species, an iconic catch that’s prized for its rich taste, bounce back to previous levels.The new rules include:The standards are far looser than a suite of regulations the S.C. Department of Natural Resources proposed earlier this ...

South Carolina has implemented stricter rules on the harvest of flounder, which will go into effect July 1.

Populations of summer flounder, a popular fish that spans coastal waters from Georgia to North Carolina, have been in severe decline for decades. The rules are aimed at letting the species, an iconic catch that’s prized for its rich taste, bounce back to previous levels.

The new rules include:

The standards are far looser than a suite of regulations the S.C. Department of Natural Resources proposed earlier this year. Those rules would have kept size restrictions the same but reduced catch limits to two fish per person or six per boat.

The most controversial provision was eschewed entirely: a season for the flounder catch, running from about the beginning of July to the end of October.

Though the regulations were scaled down, “It will still get us going in the right direction,” said Mel Bell, director of DNR’s Office of Fisheries Management.

English Glover, a former charter boat captain and a Grand Strand fishing commentator on local TV and radio programs, said the new rules were generally a positive for conservation efforts. But he was adamantly opposed to the idea of a set season. It would have deprived revenue for bait and tackle shops and other parts of the industry that supports recreational anglers, he said.

“It would be devastating in so many different realms of fishing here in the Carolinas,” he said.

North Carolina, meanwhile, has already instituted a season, which will get even more restrictive this year. Recreational seekers of the flatfish will only have two weeks at the beginning of September to catch them, and the much larger commercial fishery will be able to harvest on staggered two-week schedules from different sections of the coast.

That leaves the risk that opportunistic operations will descend on the Palmetto State’s waters to make up the difference. State Sen. Stephen Goldfinch, R-Murrells Inlet, said steeper fees for out-of-state fishing licenses that the Legislature passed along with the new catch limits will hopefully help avert that.

Those higher fees will also, in part, fund a new effort in South Carolina: a hatchery to grow more flounder and release them into coastal waters. The state has had success before in stocking species like red drum, but flounder have a complex life cycle and are notoriously hard to grow in an artificial setting, said Tanya Darden, the assistant director of DNR’s coastal lab on James Island.

The larvae, for example, don’t have both eyes on one side of their head, as bottom-dwelling adult flounder do. The eyes migrate together as infant fish grow older, but only in a delicately balanced combination of environmental conditions. Temperature also determines the sex of the fish, leaving the possibility that water at the wrong degree will produce only males, Darden said.

Some other states have flounder hatcheries, but they produce fish on smaller scales, to the tune of 100,000 a year. DNR doesn’t know yet how many it will be able to produce, but whatever the number, it likely couldn’t save the fishery by itself — that would take tens of millions of fish, according to DNR.

“It’s going to be a challenge for us. It’s one we’re up to,” Darden said.

Reach Chloe Johnson at 843-735-9985. Follow her on Twitter @_ChloeAJ.

James Island town council considering mayor pay raise, six-member council referendum

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - James Island town council members are proposing a series of changes for the future of their local government. On Thursday, town council approved the first reading of an ordinance that would triple the mayor’ salary for the next term.Mayor Bill Woolsey currently makes $15,000 a year in a part-time position as mayor, but town council member Daniel Boles is proposing changing that to $48,000 starting in 2023.“I think the job demands more time than that money reflects. I don’t think any...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - James Island town council members are proposing a series of changes for the future of their local government. On Thursday, town council approved the first reading of an ordinance that would triple the mayor’ salary for the next term.

Mayor Bill Woolsey currently makes $15,000 a year in a part-time position as mayor, but town council member Daniel Boles is proposing changing that to $48,000 starting in 2023.

“I think the job demands more time than that money reflects. I don’t think anyone runs for mayor for the money, but I would like to make it competitive or reasonable when compared with other towns and municipalities compared on what they pay their mayor,” Boles said.

The vote passed 3 to 2, but there were some questions regarding how much mayors in other areas are paid. One of the opposing votes was from Mayor Woolsey.

Woolsey says he works closely with the town administrator, which is a full-time position, and as mayor someone choose to either put in a lot of time and effort or little effort.

“I think $48,000 is too little to hire someone who would make this their full-time job, but it is really more than necessary for most people as a part time job, for someone who has a full-time job and does this as well,” Woolsey said.

Council members are encouraging people to come out to their next town council meeting in August and weigh in on whether the salary should change. If it does pass second reading, the increase would not go into effect until the next term in 2023.

Town council also considered a referendum to increase town council from four to six members. The referendum would be posed as a question on the ballot this November.

Town councilman Troy Mullinax said he is proposing the referendum because he believes the town will have more representation, and it will allow terms to be staggered.

“A lot of much smaller areas in the Charleston area, Ravenel, Hollywood, isle of Palms, they have six members already,” Mullinax said. “We have a town with 12,000 people and we need this. It also hopes to promote the staggering of terms, meaning not everyone is running at one time.”

Council voted to defer the item until their next meeting so they clean up the language in the referendum and figure out how to stagger the terms.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Expo Raises Money for Pon Pon Chapel

Contact: Sarah Millersemiller@mailbox.sc.edu843-635-5206A Waffle House, the Millennium Falcon, a pirate island, downtown Walterboro, a canal scene, trains, World War II ships and more were all displayed in LEGO bricks at the 1st Annual Palmetto Bricks Expo on Saturday, June 19 in the Colleton Museum and Farmers Market’s Market Hall. Over 250 people stopped by to see the creations of some of the best professional and hobbyist LEGO builders in the southeast. This was the first time a LEGO fan expo has happened in the...

Contact: Sarah Miller

semiller@mailbox.sc.edu

843-635-5206

A Waffle House, the Millennium Falcon, a pirate island, downtown Walterboro, a canal scene, trains, World War II ships and more were all displayed in LEGO bricks at the 1st Annual Palmetto Bricks Expo on Saturday, June 19 in the Colleton Museum and Farmers Market’s Market Hall. Over 250 people stopped by to see the creations of some of the best professional and hobbyist LEGO builders in the southeast. This was the first time a LEGO fan expo has happened in the Lowcountry and it thrilled and inspired kids and adults alike.

Andrew Heape, a local Colletonian and builder behind Palmetto Bricks, was the organizer of the Expo. Heape is the creator of the LEGO downtown Walterboro that was displayed during the WHAM! Festival. One of his most talked about builds is LEGO Waffle House complete with customers inside.

The Palmetto Bricks Expo hosted 12 builders from Myrtle Beach, Columbia, Summerville, Walterboro, Greenville, Spring Hill, Florida, Boone, NC and Augusta, Georgia. Heape reported that even more builders were interested but space was limited. Already 15 builders have requested space for the next Palmetto Bricks Expo. The event was supported by Colleton Museum and Farmers Market, PRTC, Palmetto Foot Clinic, Coastal Graphix, East Main Boutique, Sweet Dreams and Jelly Beans, Wonderworks, and Sparkles Events Décor and Design.

Donations of LEGO kits, a Lava Lamp, and gift certificates were raffled to benefit the preservation of Pon Pon Chapel of Ease. The raffle and donations raised over $700 for the Colleton County Historical and Preservation Society’s work to stabilize and preserve the chapel ruin located in Jacksonboro, SC. On July 4, 2020, the top of the front façade of Pon Pon Chapel fell. Heape, a history enthusiast, explained, “I wanted to do a LEGO event for several years now, but I felt the best way to do it was to turn it into a fundraising event for a local charity. For a while I was not sure what that charity would be, but after the tragedy last year where part of the façade of Pon Pon chapel collapsed I knew what I wanted to do; help save the historic site.”

The Colleton County Historical and Preservation Society (CCHAPS) is working with Bennett Preservation Engineers, PC to create plans for the stabilization of Pon Pon Chapel of Ease and to rebuild the front façade. Recently, Ben Cox, an Eagle Scout from James Island build and installed 3 picnic tables at the site. Katie Hyman, a student at the University of South Carolina Salkehatchie has researched the people buried at Pon Pon and investigated security at the site. CCHAPS is preparing for some work days at the site this summer.

If you are interested in supporting the preservation of Pon Pon Chapel of Ease, be sure to follow Colleton County Historical and Preservation Society on Facebook. If you would like to be on the Pon Pon email list, please send a note to info@cchaps.com. For more information about the Palmetto Bricks Expo, like them on Facebook and Instagram.

Lawmakers approve massive state budget stuffed with pork projects

By RICK BRUNDRETTLawmakers on Monday sent a strong message in adopting a state budget for the fiscal year that starts next week.Let the spending party begin – with your tax dollars.The Legislature overwhelmingly approved a $32.3 billion total budget for fiscal 2022, which includes state, federal and “other” funds, budget records show. Not included in that amount, according to the official “summary control document,” was $176 million in earlier approved spending from...

By RICK BRUNDRETT

Lawmakers on Monday sent a strong message in adopting a state budget for the fiscal year that starts next week.

Let the spending party begin – with your tax dollars.

The Legislature overwhelmingly approved a $32.3 billion total budget for fiscal 2022, which includes state, federal and “other” funds, budget records show. Not included in that amount, according to the official “summary control document,” was $176 million in earlier approved spending from the state capital reserve fund, mainly for maintenance, renovation and other building projects at public colleges and universities.

Combined, the overall spending plan for the fiscal year that starts July 1 is more than $2.5 billion, or nearly 8.5%, higher compared to the current budget, which lawmakers set at the same levels as in the prior fiscal year after the COVID-19 outbreak hit South Carolina.

Lawmakers on Monday approved, by a total vote of 147-11, a state budget version that was quickly adopted last week by a joint budget conference committee. It now goes to Gov. Henry McMaster for consideration of vetoes; lawmakers are expected to return next week to take up any vetoes.

The budget conference committee was made up of Sen. Hugh Leatherman, R-Florence, who chairs the Senate Finance Committee; Senate president Harvey Peeler, R-Cherokee; Sen. Nikki Setzler, D-Lexington; Rep. Murrell Smith, R-Sumter, who chairs the House Ways and Means Committee; and Reps. Bruce Bannister, R-Greenville, and Jackie Hayes, D-Dillon.

Excluding capital reserve fund spending, the conference committee’s budget version was $234 million higher than the House’s amended plan approved earlier this month and $529 million more than the Senate’s version adopted in April. The “new” spending in the conference committee’s plan includes an estimated $520.6 million in additional recurring revenues and $1.3 billion in projected and actual surplus dollars.

The budget approved Monday includes a 2.5% base pay increase for state employees at a total cost of $59.4 million, plus another $32.4 million and $5.9 million to cover employee retirement contribution and health insurance increases, respectively. Teachers statewide would get a $1,000 salary increase at a total cost of $72 million, while another $100 million was designated for building improvement projects in poorer school districts.

But the conference committee also carved out tens of millions, mainly from surplus funds, for lawmakers’ pet projects, which The Nerve previously detailed this year. The projects include:

The above list doesn’t include millions more out of surplus funds that lawmakers collectively funneled to various nonprofit organizations. The Legislature, however, didn’t designate any of the massive windfall to be refunded to taxpayers.

Bryce Fiedler and Kelly Brady, policy analysts with the South Carolina Policy Council, the parent organization of The Nerve, contributed to this story. Brundrett is the news editor of The Nerve (www.thenerve.org). Contact him at 803-254-4411 or rick@thenerve.org. Follow him on Twitter @RickBrundrett. Follow The Nerve on Facebook and Twitter @thenervesc.

Nerve stories are free to reprint and repost with permission by and credit to The Nerve.

Charleston County Public Library to distribute meals to children beginning Monday

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston County Library says they have teamed up with the Lowcountry Food Bank and Charleston County School District to provide free meals and snacks at select branches and mobile library stops.The program provides free lunches or snacks to children 18 years of age and younger during the traditional summer vacation period.Officials say the meals are provided by CCSD’s Nutrition Services Department and will be distributed Monday through Friday at six library branches between Monday and Aug. ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston County Library says they have teamed up with the Lowcountry Food Bank and Charleston County School District to provide free meals and snacks at select branches and mobile library stops.

The program provides free lunches or snacks to children 18 years of age and younger during the traditional summer vacation period.

Officials say the meals are provided by CCSD’s Nutrition Services Department and will be distributed Monday through Friday at six library branches between Monday and Aug. 6.

Those six locations and their start times are as follows:

John’s Island Regional: 3531 Maybank Highway, John’s Island

Projected to BEGIN July 19 due to construction

10:30 - 10:45 a.m.

Otranto Regional: 2261 Otranto Road, Charleston

Projected to BEGIN July 7 due to construction

10:30 – 10:45 a.m.

Dorchester Road Regional: 6325 Dorchester Road, North Charleston

Projected to END June 30 due to construction

11:10 - 11:25 a.m.

John L. Dart: 1067 King Street, Charleston

11:30 – 11:45 a.m.

Cooper River Memorial: 2036 Cherokee Street, Charleston

12 - 12:15 p.m.

Main Library: 68 Calhoun Street, Charleston

12 – 12:15 p.m.

Additionally, snacks will be provided at three branches and three mobile stops:

McClellanville: 222 Baker Street, McClellanville

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 12 -1 p.m.

(On Tuesdays, breakfast will be served from 10 – 11 a.m. courtesy of CCSD)

Edisto: 1589 Highway 174, Edisto Island

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. 2 - 3 p.m.

Baxter-Patrick James Island: 1858 Grimball Road, Charleston

Monday – Friday, 2:30 – 3:30 p.m.

CCPL’s Mobile Library: Various Stops

Wadmalaw Community Center: 5605 Katy Hill Road, Wadmalaw Island

First and Third Thursdays of the Month, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Adams Run Wiltown Community Center: 5779 Parkers Ferry Road, Adams Run

First and Third Thursdays of the Month, 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.

Awendaw Seewee Outpost: 4853 N. Highway 17, Awendaw

Second and Fourth Thursdays of the Month, 9:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

“Providing equitable access to vital resources is a key focus of CCPL, and we are thrilled to expand our Summer Feeding program to even more areas of the county through our Mobile Library,” Devon Andrews, CCPL Associate Director, Community Engagement, said . “We are so grateful to our partners at CCSD Nutrition Services and Lowcountry Food Bank for making this program possible and helping us better serve the Charleston community.”

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.