Gutter Cleaning in
Johns Island SC

Ask Us Anything!

843 606 0798

Quick Quote

The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in Johns Island, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in Johns Island.

Service Areas

Gutter Cleaning in Johns Island, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

foundation-damage.jpg

Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

Wood-Damage.jpg

Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

Landscaping-Damage

Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

Gutter-Damage.jpg

Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in Johns Island for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in Johns Island, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

Sagging-Gutters-1

Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

Birds-and-Pests-2.png

Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

Stains-on-Your-Siding-1

Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

Plant-Life-1

Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in Johns Island, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

Gutter-Installation-sc

At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in Johns Island, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in Johns Island:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in Johns Island. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
Gutter-Installation-sc

Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in Johns Island, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in Johns Island, SC:

icon-Pooling-Water
Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
icon-Leaks
Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
icon-Displaced-Hardware
Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
mold
Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
iconPeeling-Paint
Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
Uneven-Gutters
Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in Johns Island

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in Johns Island. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

Contact Us

Latest News in Johns Island

Commentary: How Oakville success helps preserve Johns Island’s rural heritage

Traveling along Maybank Highway on Johns Island may evoke the sense that rampant development has overrun this storied sea island. But a short detour along River Road or Bohicket Road gives a completely different impression. It quickly becomes obvious that Johns Island is still a place rich with culture and history — with rural communities, farms and forests, and oak-canopied byways all serving as powerful testament to the persistence of a unique people and a beautiful working landscape.In fact, about 80% of Johns Island is still...

Traveling along Maybank Highway on Johns Island may evoke the sense that rampant development has overrun this storied sea island. But a short detour along River Road or Bohicket Road gives a completely different impression. It quickly becomes obvious that Johns Island is still a place rich with culture and history — with rural communities, farms and forests, and oak-canopied byways all serving as powerful testament to the persistence of a unique people and a beautiful working landscape.

In fact, about 80% of Johns Island is still rural. It is this Johns Island that constitutes the vast majority of the island’s acreage, and that holds the promise of a rural heritage that will endure into the future.

There is a reason most of the island remains rural. In 2000, Charleston County enacted agricultural zoning on large farm and forest properties below Plow Ground Road and thus protected about half of the acreage from suburban development. This new zoning also stabilized the traditional African American settlement communities. Finally, in part due to funds made available by the Charleston County Greenbelt Program, 3,365 acres have been protected.

But this future is only partially secure. Zoning can be changed. Urban infrastructure driving suburban sprawl development can be extended. Despite more than two decades of hard work by the county, Johns Island landowners and the local community, the landscape could be lost in the blink of an eye. Now, however, thanks to an inspiring partnership between commerce, conservation, the city of Charleston, the S.C. Conservation Bank and Charleston County, the future of Johns Island looks increasingly bright.

To appreciate this latest conservation accomplishment-in-the-making, it is important to understand that the greatest risk to rural Johns Island is the conversion of land along the Urban Growth Boundary, adjacent to the Charleston Executive Airport. Here, a parcel called Oakville was marked for development.

Although this 95-acre property is on the “growth” side of the boundary, it is totally unsuited for development. Positioned at the mouth of Burden Creek, the entire parcel is only a few feet above sea level. Despite extensive discussion about the perils of developing flood-prone areas and vocal community opposition, outdated zoning laws allowed for the construction of 200 to 400 houses.

Additionally, the parcel’s location adjacent to the airport increased the risk of fatal plane accidents. Further, undoubtedly residents would be consistently disturbed by low-flying planes, creating an inevitable conflict between homeowners and the airport.

It was this concern that the conservation partners brought to the Charleston County Aviation Authority. The partners — including the Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation, the Coastal Conservation League, the Johns Island Task Force, the Lowcountry Land Trust and the Open Space Institute — found common interest with the Aviation Authority in protecting Oakville from development.

The Aviation Authority recognized the critical importance of ensuring safety for future airport activity, along with the additional resilience benefit — in keeping with the Dutch Dialogues recommendations — of avoiding development on low-lying land. Further, conserving the open space along the edge of the Urban Growth Boundary helps stabilize traditional rural communities by preventing suburban sprawl and the associated increase in taxes and service fees. This unique partnership culminated in the Aviation Authority purchasing Oakville in late July for $7.7 million.

With Oakville out of the developer’s hands, the last step in the process is ensuring the property’s permanent protection. To that end, the S.C. Conservation Bank recently voted to help fund the purchase of a conservation easement. And on Tuesday, Charleston City Council unanimously voted to support funding the project through the Charleston County Greenbelt Program in its upcoming cycle.

Once completed, Oakville will be a great achievement and the first step toward establishing a permanent greenbelt on Johns Island. It illustrates what can be done when a wide array of community members, organizations and public entities work together toward a common future. This is important because much land still remains to be preserved on Johns Island. It will take hard work over the coming years, but we should all take heart that we have the institutions, the financial resources and, most importantly, the people to rise to the challenge.

Michelle Sinkler is the special projects manager with the Open Space Institute. This column was submitted by the institute, the Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation, the Coastal Conservation League, the Johns Island Task Force and the Lowcountry Land Trust.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Editorial: Charleston should seize chance to protect low-lying Johns Island land

As Charleston got serious about its threats from flooding and sea level rise, it launched the Dutch Dialogues to develop a road map showing how it could and should adapt and prepare for the future. Chief among those steps was a smart new zoning policy to guide development away from low-lying land and toward properties far less likely to flood.This idea has been fleshed out further during work on Charleston’s new comprehensive plan, and we urge the city to begin revamping its zoning code soon to codify this new elevation-based ap...

As Charleston got serious about its threats from flooding and sea level rise, it launched the Dutch Dialogues to develop a road map showing how it could and should adapt and prepare for the future. Chief among those steps was a smart new zoning policy to guide development away from low-lying land and toward properties far less likely to flood.

This idea has been fleshed out further during work on Charleston’s new comprehensive plan, and we urge the city to begin revamping its zoning code soon to codify this new elevation-based approach. But even before that happens, a pending conservation deal on Johns Island would mark an important step toward the larger goal. Both the city and the county should approve it.

The deal involves about 100 acres recently purchased for the Charleston Executive Airport on Johns Island — where a 242-home development known as River Run had been proposed. The Charleston County Aviation Authority closed on the site this summer.

While the airport’s purchase ends the immediate threat of development, it does not guarantee there will be no development there in the long run. That’s why the Lowcountry Land Trust and the city of Charleston plan to seek $500,000 from the city’s share of Charleston County greenbelt funds to place a permanent easement on 94 acres of the site. City Council is expected to vote this month on making the application, and council members should give it the green light.

The S.C. Conservation Bank already has granted the Land Trust $500,000 toward the conservation easement purchase; the aviation authority would receive $1 million total, only 25% of the easement’s total value.

Dale Morris, the city’s new resiliency director, toured the River Run site while consulting on the city’s Dutch Dialogue process and its more recent Charleston City Plan Land and Water Analysis. He found its low elevation — much of the land is 6 feet above sea level or lower — made it an unwise place to build. Leaving it alone would allow the marsh along the Stono River to migrate gradually landward as sea levels rise.

Of course, airport officials were interested in the land to ensure the airport has an adequate buffer between any future expansion and neighboring development, and that’s a sensible, forward-thinking move. Regardless of what happens with the airport, this conservation deal would be an important piece of ensuring that no flood-prone development ever occurs there. The easement would allow some minimal future public access, such as a nature trail or kayak launch.

The Historic Charleston Foundation, which helped sponsor the Dutch Dialogues, feels strongly that the easement deal would be a win-win and is also urging City Council to allocate $500,000 of its greenbelt funds. Additionally, we would urge the Greenbelt Advisory Board and County Council to approve it as well.

It’s easy to say that future development should not occur in the city’s low-lying areas, but actually preventing it is much more difficult. Many property owners are invested in land that they want their families to profit from one day, and much of our current zoning gives them the right to expect just that.

It’s true that zoning can and should be changed, but the work of guiding development away from these places also must address these owners’ interests — not necessarily by giving them all the profit they once might have hoped for but certainly not expecting them to bear a disproportionate share of the whole cost to make our community more resilient.

Accomplishing all that will take negotiation and hard work, and this Johns Island easement deal marks a hopeful first step toward that.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Lowcountry Fungi grows at its indoor Johns Island farm

Plenty of people picked up new hobbies during the COVID-19 shutdown — some tried their hands at bread-baking, while others dusted off their golf clubs or started a home renovation project. Lowcountry Fungi co-owners Jonathan Cox and Benny Mosiman started an indoor mushroom farm.“Many years ago, I was part of the Charleston Permaculture Guild and loved making mushroom logs and just did it casually,” said Cox, who also owns local kombucha company One Love. “When COVID happened, production from One Love kind of sl...

Plenty of people picked up new hobbies during the COVID-19 shutdown — some tried their hands at bread-baking, while others dusted off their golf clubs or started a home renovation project. Lowcountry Fungi co-owners Jonathan Cox and Benny Mosiman started an indoor mushroom farm.

“Many years ago, I was part of the Charleston Permaculture Guild and loved making mushroom logs and just did it casually,” said Cox, who also owns local kombucha company One Love. “When COVID happened, production from One Love kind of slowed down. So mushrooms came up, and I saw that there wasn’t really a good gourmet mushroom farm in Charleston.”

An idea started to form, and Cox hit the road in summer 2020, learning the ins and outs of indoor mushroom farming from Myers Mushrooms owner Eric Myers in Wichita, Kansas. Cox and Mosiman then built their own 1,000-foot facility in the same Johns Island warehouse as One Love, where they grow five mushroom varieties: blue oysters, lion’s mane, king trumpet, pioppini and black pearls. According to Cox, growing indoors allows for more quality control.

“Indoor farming is a much more controlled environment, but it allows you to grow a variety of mushrooms as well as a much higher quality than outdoors,” he said. “We’re creating a perfect environment, so it’s a much more efficient system.”

But how exactly does the duo grow mushrooms? According to Cox, “It’s not a very simple process. Mushrooms start off as mycelium, which is kind of like the seed, and you grow that onto substrates — like woods or waste products. It consumes all the energy from that substrate.”

Made of oak sawdust and soybean hulls, Cox’s substrate is placed in a plastic bag where the mushrooms grow. After the bags are run through a steam sterilizer to kill competitive micro-organisms, they are inoculated with the mycelium. The bags are then sealed for 4-6 weeks, allowing the mycelium to colonize the substrate. Still with us?

Once the bags are fully colonized, Cox takes them into his 200-square-foot “Grow Room” — which mimics a forest with 95% humidity and a temperature in the high 50s — and cuts open the bags. Exposure to oxygen, cool temperatures and high humidity stimulates the mushroom growth. Once harvested and packaged, the mushrooms are ready to be sold to trendy downtown spots like 167 Raw, Babas on Cannon, Basic Kitchen and Daps Breakfast and Imbibe.

“People like our mushrooms because our grow room is top-notch,” Cox said. “Growing them in cold temperatures and harvesting them young are definitely reasons why chefs love our mushrooms over most [others’].”

Folks who keep it local when purchasing mushrooms from Lowcountry Fungi are positively contributing to the environment. Every three pounds of mushrooms produce six pounds of compost — Spade & Clover Gardens owner John Warren picks up this compost for use on his Johns Island farm.

“He breaks it up and tills it into his soil,” said Cox, adding that the compost helps with water retention and pest management. “It adds life to the soil.”

Another reason to keep it local is mushooms’ short shelf life, Cox said.

“The main reason to buy local is mushrooms don’t last through distribution really well, so the sooner you can consume after harvesting, the higher-quality they’re going to be,” he said. “The shelf life is going to be better when it’s coming 20 miles down the road as opposed to 100.”

Fungi fans can purchase Lowcountry Fungi’s mushrooms at the downtown, West Ashley and Sea Island farmers markets, along with Lowcountry Street Grocery and Veggie Bin on Spring Street. Moving forward, Cox plans to add medicinal mushrooms and “value-add” products like mushroom patties and mushroom-infused coffee.

“Value-added products are my main focus, as well as teaching workshops on how to grow your own mushrooms at home and gardening with mushroom compost.”

For more information, follow Lowcountry Fungi on Instagram, @lowcountryfungi.

This story was the first installment of “Keep it Local,” a City Paper series that will provide an in-depth look at South Carolina ingredients and the folks behind the scenes supplying restaurants and home cooks with local produce, meat, fish and more.

Good food, nice folks, adventure - and monks! - in Moncks Corner. Where to go

“Why did they name this town ‘Moncks Corner,’ Dad? Is it named after monks? Do monks live here or something?”I looked in the rear-view mirror at my young son in the back seat. He was staring out the window at the scenes passing by of small town life. I thought about his question.“Well, no. Moncks Corner is not named after monks ... but monks, in fact, DO live in Moncks Corner.”My family and I were spending the day in and around the Lowcountry town of Moncks Corner, a small community le...

“Why did they name this town ‘Moncks Corner,’ Dad? Is it named after monks? Do monks live here or something?”

I looked in the rear-view mirror at my young son in the back seat. He was staring out the window at the scenes passing by of small town life. I thought about his question.

“Well, no. Moncks Corner is not named after monks ... but monks, in fact, DO live in Moncks Corner.”

My family and I were spending the day in and around the Lowcountry town of Moncks Corner, a small community less than an hour north of Charleston and about two hours from the Beaufort area that offers a variety of things to see and do.

If you appreciate the charm of a small town, meeting friendly people, and experiencing the natural beauty of the Lowcountry woods and waterways, then a visit to Moncks Corner will not disappoint.

Moncks Corner was formally established in 1885 and incorporated in 1909 as a vital hub of the Northeastern Railway, which had run since 1856 between Charleston and central North Carolina. The railroad brought commerce and a depot, but Moncks Corner’s origins go back much farther than that.

The town lies at the edge of Santee River country and was first settled by native Americans. Later, during colonial times, families of French Huguenots came there. These religious refugees from persecution flocked to the Lowcountry in the 1680s and settled along the Santee River bottom. There, they carved profitable plantations out of the land and into the cream of South Carolina society, adding names like Mazyk, Manigault, Huger and Marion to social registers.

Sometime around 1728, a landowner named T. Monck settled in the area and left his name to a growing community forming on the Charleston road. When the fires of revolution came, “Moncks Corner” became the site of battles between British and Patriot troops, including the men of General Francis Marion, the “Swamp Fox,” who led a guerrilla war along the region’s backroads and wilderness.

Since then, Moncks Corner witnessed the construction of the nearby Santee Canal (preserved at Old Santee Canal Park, 900 Stoney Landing Road), the coming of the railroads and, in the 20th century, the building of the vast Santee-Cooper lakes that serve the energy needs of millions — while providing a haven for wildlife and a paradise for anglers and boaters.

When you visit Moncks Corner today, you will find a small town that stands at the edge of the vast modern development around Charleston and the wild Santee country beyond. A visit offers you a taste of modern life as well as a trip down memory lane — and the option of a day of outdoor adventure to boot.

The first thing you must do: Bring a big appetite and good sense of humor, because you are eating breakfast at Howard’s Restaurant. Howard’s, at 336 E. Main St., boasts the “Best food on the Corner since 1960.” Here you will find excellent Lowcountry cooking — but no menus. The owner will come over to let you know what’s being served, or take your order as you like.

I first visited Howard’s years ago with friends, and when one asked for a menu, he was asked, “Don’t you know what you want for breakfast? It’s breakfast. How hard can it be?” A plate of eggs, bacon and French toast later, and breakfast proved to be easy indeed. (Howard’s is open 5 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Call 843-761-8565 for more info.)

Moncks Corner has great small town shopping in the downtown and in the surrounding community. My family and I enjoyed a visit to Collectors Corner Antiques at 308 E. Main St. “We sell a variety of eclectic stuff,” says Ann, a shop employee, “from antiques to home decor.”

Each of us bought some form of old treasure that was needed for a collection — or would add just the right touch to a worthy corner of our home. (Collectors Corner Antiques is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Call 843-899-1886 for info.)

Prizes in hand, we soon left town to explore the countryside. Our first stop was the Biggin Church Ruins, at the intersection of S.C. 402 and Carswell Lane. This brick edifice was once the Parish Church of St. John’s Berkeley before being burned by British troops in 1781. It stands today as a hollow shell, a reminder of the destruction of war and the enduring hope of a people seeking freedom from tyranny.

The last stop was Mepkin Abbey, at 1098 Mepkin Abbey Road in Moncks Corner. Founded on the site of Mepkin, a Colonial-era rice plantation, the abbey is home to a religious community of Trappist monks. Here, they live and worship, and their community is open daily to the public. A reception center serves as a gift shop and front door for visitors. Tours can be arranged and gifts can be purchased here, including locally made candy, honey and other items produced at the Abbey. You also can get directions to quietly enjoy a walk of the grounds, the Nancy Bryan Luce Gardens, and the historic Laurens Family cemetery. (Mepkin is open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday. Call 843-761-8509 or visit the website, https://mepkinabbey.org/day-visits/)

My family and I headed back home, but we could have explored more, for just beyond Mepkin lies the community of Childsbury, where a historic church and a few homes are all that remain of a once-thriving plantation community. In the forest beyond Childsbury lies Bonneau Ferry WMA and the ruins of Comingtee Plantation — where a haunted tree is rumored to still grow. Read about this historic and mysterious place in a previous Packet column.

If you are looking for a day out and place to visit that offers a variety of adventures and experiences for all ages, check out Moncks Corner.

Moncks Corner is about two hours from the Beaufort area and easy to visit on a day trip. Take U.S. 17 north toward Charleston and turn left onto S.C. 165 in Ravenel for 21 miles to Summerville. In Summerville, turn right onto U.S. 17-ALT/N. Main Street and drive for 15 miles to Moncks Corner.

Biggin Church and Mepkin Abbey are off U.S. 17 ALT/U.S. 52. Take S.C. 402 East to Biggin Church Ruins and continue on S.C. 402 East to Dr. Evans Road/S-8-44 for 5.6 miles to Mepkin Abbey.

Lowcountry High School Football Coverage - Week 6

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) -9/30Bamberg-Ehrhardt 24, Beckham 7 - Beckham played their first varsity game after receiving permission from the SCHSL to fill their schedule with varsity games but came up short at home.Battery Creek 30, Academic Magnet 20 - The Raptors were led by William Hyatt who went 21-31 for 266 yards and 2 TD’s while also rushing for 50 yards and another score. Charlie Kuyper also added 14 catches for 144 yards and a score. Academic Magnet drops to 2-3 on the season.10...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) -

9/30

Bamberg-Ehrhardt 24, Beckham 7 - Beckham played their first varsity game after receiving permission from the SCHSL to fill their schedule with varsity games but came up short at home.

Battery Creek 30, Academic Magnet 20 - The Raptors were led by William Hyatt who went 21-31 for 266 yards and 2 TD’s while also rushing for 50 yards and another score. Charlie Kuyper also added 14 catches for 144 yards and a score. Academic Magnet drops to 2-3 on the season.

10/1

Summerville 29, Stratford 7 - The Green Wave improve to 3-1 on the season while the Knights drop to 1-3

Ft. Dorchester 38, Ashley Ridge 7 - The Patriots stay undefeated at 5-0 while the Swamp Foxes drop to 2-3

Goose Creek 53, Berkeley 14 - The Gators were led by Demetri Simmons who rushed for 249 yards and 4 TD’s to improve to 4-2. The Stags drop to 1-2.

Cane Bay 27, Wando 7 - Jayvion Johnson threw for 2 TD’s as the Cobras move to 5-1 with the win. The Warriors fall to 2-2.

West Ashley 69, Stall 21 - The Wildcats improve to 2-3 on the season led by Jahleel Porter who rushed for 146 yards and 4 TD’s on the night. Zaye’Quan Smith also rushed for 140 yards and a score. Stall drops to 0-3

May River 35, James Island 18

Bluffton 55, Colleton County 30 - The Cougars drop their season opener despite leading 24-6 at the half.

Oceanside Collegiate at Bishop England - The Landsharks go to 3-3 with the win while the Bishops fall to 0-5

Hanahan 63, North Charleston 0 - Josh Shaw scored 3 early TD’s to lead the Hawks to the win to move to 4-1. The Cougars fall to 2-2.

Philip Simmons 63, Burke 0 - The Iron Horses improve to 5-1 while the Bulldogs drop to 1-3

Woodland 27, Lake Marion 18 - The Wolverines move to 1-2 with the victory

Timberland 43, Ridgeland-Hardeeville 0 - The Wolves stay undefeated on the season at 5-0 with the win

Whale Branch 31, Cross 14 - The Trojans fall to 0-2 on the season

Baptist Hill 42, St. John’s 22 - The Bobcats improve to 2-2 while the Islanders drop to 0-6

Laurence Manning 22, Porter-Gaud 17 - The Cyclones were led by Marshall Pritchett who threw for 78 yards and rushed for 67 and a touchdown but the loss drops them to 4-3.

Hilton Head Christian 48, Pinewood Prep 14 - The Panthers fall to 3-3 with the loss

Colleton Prep 38, Bethesda Academy 0 - The War Hawks move to 2-4 with the victory

Calhoun Academy 27, Dorchester Academy 23

St. John’s Academy 44, Kings Academy 0 - The Cavaliers improve to 4-1 on the season

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.