Gutter Cleaning in
Kiawah Island SC

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The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in Kiawah Island, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in Kiawah Island.

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Gutter Cleaning in Kiawah Island, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

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Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

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Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

Landscaping-Damage

Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

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Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in Kiawah Island for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in Kiawah Island, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

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Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

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Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

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Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

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Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in Kiawah Island, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

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At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in Kiawah Island, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in Kiawah Island:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in Kiawah Island. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
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Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in Kiawah Island, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in Kiawah Island, SC:

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Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
icon-Leaks
Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
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Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
mold
Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
iconPeeling-Paint
Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
Uneven-Gutters
Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in Kiawah Island

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in Kiawah Island. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

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Latest News in Kiawah Island

How South Carolina’s Kiawah Island strikes a balance between tourism and conservation

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier b...

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.

But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier beachfront homes. Kiawah Island has solidified itself as one of the most eco-friendly residential areas and tourist destinations in the United States, with conservation efforts dating back nearly half a century. Visitors are the beneficiaries of these extensive efforts, and the island is a rare example of how tourism and ecological concern can coexist.

In 1973, Kiawah Island established the Kiawah Turtle Patrol, an organization that tracks and protects the island’s native population of nesting loggerhead turtles. Soon after, Kiawah Investment, a Kuwaiti-owned company, purchased the island from heirs to a lumber company operator and, in 1975, conducted an environmental inventory of the island over the course of 16 months, studying natural habitats, wildlife and archaeological history, said Donna Windham, executive director of the Kiawah Conservancy.

The widespread inventory led to a master plan, which has since been enacted by the town of Kiawah, that combines environmental activism with tourism and leisure. “It was a whole new environment for them,” Windham said of the Kuwaiti effort. “They took it very seriously that this island was special.” Today, Windham said, the Kiawah Conservancy operates as a nonprofit land trust for the island, encouraging the protection of the environment by working in conjunction with landowners.

The conservancy, established in 1997, can hold land and issue easements. It has, to date, preserved “2,273 acres of Kiawah’s 10,000 acres,” according to the island’s website. In January 2000, Windham said, 152 acres of land known as Little Bear Island — a nesting destination for coastal birds such as the piping plover, peregrine falcon and osprey — were preserved by the Wetlands America Trust, part of the Ducks Unlimited nonprofit conservation group. The easement was updated in 2007 to include protection from the trust and the Kiawah Island Natural Habitat Conservancy.

As a traveler, you may see no concrete indication of the infrastructure that governs the island’s conservation. Yet the influence is everywhere, evident in the clamoring hermit crabs at the shoreline, the robust oyster beds that climb upward on the riverbanks, and the petite raccoons that scale trees at dusk in search of their next meal.

Close to the island’s Ocean Course, where a strip of cerulean is just visible beyond the marsh, a passerby might be privy to any number of natural encounters: alligators with snouts just visible in the pond water; hook-necked blue herons staring out into the palmettos; white-tailed deer bedding down beneath the drapery of Spanish moss. These moments, despite their frequency, arrive as a surprise in a place where golf clubs and impeccable architecture are the local currency.

But you’re more likely than not to encounter a wild animal during your visit, and that’s because Kiawah Island includes 3,000 acres of tidal salt marsh and 10 miles of shoreline, providing shelter for a variety of wildlife. According to town of Kiawah Wildlife Biologist Jim Jordan — his position was created in 2000 and, eight years later, Assistant Wildlife Biologist Aaron Given arrived — there are 315 species of birds, more than 30 species of mammals, more than 40 species of reptiles, more than 20 species of amphibians, and thousands of invertebrates that call the island home.

“It’s pretty unique,” Jordan said. It is, he said, “a functioning, intact ecosystem that’s working the way it would have worked if there were no houses there.”

One of the island’s most fascinating predators is the bobcat; the current bobcat population, Jordan said, is between 15 and 20. Four to six bobcats are collared by the biology team each year, so their movements can be tracked via GPS. “Visitors and residents can look at the tracking maps online and see where they’ve been,” he said.

Take a boat out onto the serene Kiawah River — you can book tours through the island’s sole resort, the Kiawah Island Golf Resort — and you’re bound to see a dolphin or two, gray fin slipping in and out of the water. These are the island’s bottlenose species, and they’re friendly, tracking vessels and providing the occasional show, flippers aflight. They also engage in a unique behavior known as “strand-feeding.”

“In a coordinated effort, they will basically force a school of fish or a school of shrimp up toward the bank,” Jordan said. “They beach themselves.” The western end of the island makes for good viewing of this behavior, although he warned that disrupting dolphins during their strand-feeds can be harmful. “It’s a learned behavior,” passed down from generation to generation, Jordan said. Should a strand-feed get interrupted, dolphins could abandon the behavior entirely, thus keeping future generations from learning how to eat in this location-specific manner.

The serenity experienced on this island oasis is thanks to more than just the work of the conservancy. At the Sanctuary at Kiawah Island Golf Resort, for instance, an AAA five-diamond resort that was built in 2004, live, mature oak trees were transplanted to help promote the maintenance of the natural environment. “This really wasn’t required. It was just something that we did voluntarily, because we thought it was the right thing to do,” said Bryan Hunter, director of public relations for the Kiawah Island Golf Resort.

The resort, he said, places a premium on conservation efforts, encouraging guests to immerse themselves in the local environment through organized boat trips to other barrier islands, alligator safaris and dolphin-viewing excursions. Visitors can also tag along with the Turtle Patrol in the morning in search of hatching and migration patterns (although that program has been greatly restricted because of the coronavirus pandemic). Some may even get to assist hatchling turtles, Hunter said. Those who join the Turtle Patrol outings look for nests, take notes and record observations about the year’s hatch.

One conservation effort enforced by island residents — including hoteliers — is the Lights Out for Sea Turtles initiative, which requires that beach-illuminating lights be turned off in the evenings during loggerhead nesting season. As Jordan pointed out, artificial light confuses hatchling turtles, often accidentally guiding them away from the ocean.

Low light pollution, Hunter said, is “vital.” “The resort, along with the rest of the island, through town ordinance, makes sure that we really carefully monitor light pollution along the beach, so that it doesn’t disorient nesting sea turtles or hatching sea turtles,” he said.

As the sun descends at dusk, there is a vibration in the air. Is it the cicadas, on their 17-year cycle? Or maybe just a faraway flock of birds? Whatever the origin of the ambient noise, it calls to mind a soothing bedtime melody, the kind you might slip into as you wind down into sleep.

Potential travelers should take local and national public health directives regarding the pandemic into consideration before planning any trips. Travel health notice information can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's interactive map showing travel recommendations by destination and the CDC's travel health notice webpage.

This AAA five-diamond property has 255 guest rooms and suites, as well as multiple dining venues and direct beach access. Rooms from about $240.

Run by the Kiawah Island Golf Resort, this 1.5-hour boat excursion takes guests through creeks and marshes in search of the island’s native bottlenose dolphin population. $450 for up to six passengers.

Situated on the west end of the island, this ocean beach offers the only public access on Kiawah. Amenities include lifeguards, chair and umbrella rentals, restrooms, outdoor showers, a snack bar and a picnic area with grills. Parking $5 to $15 per vehicle.

Guests can ask resident wildlife biologists about the local ecology and visit with some of the native and nonnative species, such as diamondback terrapins and a 10-foot-long Burmese python. The center’s gift shop sells handcrafted items made by local artists. Free.

Walk or bike this one-mile scenic trail that extends over the marsh to a lookout tower. Part of the larger Kiawah Island bike trails system, which covers about 30 miles, this trail is suitable for all ages.

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How Kiawah Island, S.C., keeps itself a haven for golfers and wildlife alike

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier b...

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.

But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier beachfront homes. Kiawah Island has solidified itself as one of the most eco-friendly residential areas and tourist destinations in the United States, with conservation efforts dating back nearly half a century. Visitors are the beneficiaries of these extensive efforts, and the island is a rare example of how tourism and ecological concern can coexist.

In 1973, Kiawah Island established the Kiawah Turtle Patrol, an organization that tracks and protects the island’s native population of nesting loggerhead turtles. Soon after, Kiawah Investment, a Kuwaiti-owned company, purchased the island from heirs to a lumber company operator and, in 1975, conducted an environmental inventory of the island over the course of 16 months, studying natural habitats, wildlife and archaeological history, said Donna Windham, executive director of the Kiawah Conservancy.

The widespread inventory led to a master plan, which has since been enacted by the town of Kiawah, that combines environmental activism with tourism and leisure. “It was a whole new environment for them,” Windham said of the Kuwaiti effort. “They took it very seriously that this island was special.” Today, Windham said, the Kiawah Conservancy operates as a nonprofit land trust for the island, encouraging the protection of the environment by working in conjunction with landowners.

The conservancy, established in 1997, can hold land and issue easements. It has, to date, preserved “2,273 acres of Kiawah’s 10,000 acres,” according to the island’s website. In January 2000, Windham said, 152 acres of land known as Little Bear Island — a nesting destination for coastal birds such as the piping plover, peregrine falcon and osprey — were preserved by the Wetlands America Trust, part of the Ducks Unlimited nonprofit conservation group. The easement was updated in 2007 to include protection from the trust and the Kiawah Island Natural Habitat Conservancy.

As a traveler, you may see no concrete indication of the infrastructure that governs the island’s conservation. Yet the influence is everywhere, evident in the clamoring hermit crabs at the shoreline, the robust oyster beds that climb upward on the riverbanks, and the petite raccoons that scale trees at dusk in search of their next meal.

Close to the island’s Ocean Course, where a strip of cerulean is just visible beyond the marsh, a passerby might be privy to any number of natural encounters: alligators with snouts just visible in the pond water; hook-necked blue herons staring out into the palmettos; white-tailed deer bedding down beneath the drapery of Spanish moss. These moments, despite their frequency, arrive as a surprise in a place where golf clubs and impeccable architecture are the local currency.

But you’re more likely than not to encounter a wild animal during your visit, and that’s because Kiawah Island includes 3,000 acres of tidal salt marsh and 10 miles of shoreline, providing shelter for a variety of wildlife. According to town of Kiawah Wildlife Biologist Jim Jordan — his position was created in 2000 and, eight years later, Assistant Wildlife Biologist Aaron Given arrived — there are 315 species of birds, more than 30 species of mammals, more than 40 species of reptiles, more than 20 species of amphibians, and thousands of invertebrates that call the island home.

“It’s pretty unique,” Jordan said. It is, he said, “a functioning, intact ecosystem that’s working the way it would have worked if there were no houses there.”

One of the island’s most fascinating predators is the bobcat; the current bobcat population, Jordan said, is between 15 and 20. Four to six bobcats are collared by the biology team each year, so their movements can be tracked via GPS. “Visitors and residents can look at the tracking maps online and see where they’ve been,” he said.

Take a boat out onto the serene Kiawah River — you can book tours through the island’s sole resort, the Kiawah Island Golf Resort — and you’re bound to see a dolphin or two, gray fin slipping in and out of the water. These are the island’s bottlenose species, and they’re friendly, tracking vessels and providing the occasional show, flippers aflight. They also engage in a unique behavior known as “strand-feeding.”

“In a coordinated effort, they will basically force a school of fish or a school of shrimp up toward the bank,” Jordan said. “They beach themselves.” The western end of the island makes for good viewing of this behavior, although he warned that disrupting dolphins during their strand-feeds can be harmful. “It’s a learned behavior,” passed down from generation to generation, Jordan said. Should a strand-feed get interrupted, dolphins could abandon the behavior entirely, thus keeping future generations from learning how to eat in this location-specific manner.

The serenity experienced on this island oasis is thanks to more than just the work of the conservancy. At the Sanctuary at Kiawah Island Golf Resort, for instance, an AAA five-diamond resort that was built in 2004, live, mature oak trees were transplanted to help promote the maintenance of the natural environment. “This really wasn’t required. It was just something that we did voluntarily, because we thought it was the right thing to do,” said Bryan Hunter, director of public relations for the Kiawah Island Golf Resort.

The resort, he said, places a premium on conservation efforts, encouraging guests to immerse themselves in the local environment through organized boat trips to other barrier islands, alligator safaris and dolphin-viewing excursions. Visitors can also tag along with the Turtle Patrol in the morning in search of hatching and migration patterns (although that program has been greatly restricted because of the coronavirus pandemic). Some may even get to assist hatchling turtles, Hunter said. Those who join the Turtle Patrol outings look for nests, take notes and record observations about the year’s hatch.

One conservation effort enforced by island residents — including hoteliers — is the Lights Out for Sea Turtles initiative, which requires that beach-illuminating lights be turned off in the evenings during loggerhead nesting season. As Jordan pointed out, artificial light confuses hatchling turtles, often accidentally guiding them away from the ocean.

Low light pollution, Hunter said, is “vital.” “The resort, along with the rest of the island, through town ordinance, makes sure that we really carefully monitor light pollution along the beach, so that it doesn’t disorient nesting sea turtles or hatching sea turtles,” he said.

As the sun descends at dusk, there is a vibration in the air. Is it the cicadas, on their 17-year cycle? Or maybe just a faraway flock of birds? Whatever the origin of the ambient noise, it calls to mind a soothing bedtime melody, the kind you might slip into as you wind down into sleep.

And conservation-minded tourists will sleep just fine.

Jim's Caddie Corner: A terrific season on the local links

It has been a great golf season and there is still some nice weather in the forecast. However, there are some cool days ahead and Mother Nature has plans for the near future. This is the perfect time to plan a golf getaway down south. So many golfers enjoy traveling to Florida for a golf vacation but there are some great destinations in South Carolina and Georgia that you may want to consider over the next three to four weeks if you can get away.The weather in the Southeast is still very nice with temperatures in the 70s. That is cert...

It has been a great golf season and there is still some nice weather in the forecast. However, there are some cool days ahead and Mother Nature has plans for the near future. This is the perfect time to plan a golf getaway down south. So many golfers enjoy traveling to Florida for a golf vacation but there are some great destinations in South Carolina and Georgia that you may want to consider over the next three to four weeks if you can get away.

The weather in the Southeast is still very nice with temperatures in the 70s. That is certainly pleasant weather to play golf and enjoy other outdoor activities. Even when the weather dips down into the 60s, you can play lots of golf and enjoy a stroll along the beach. There are lots of good deals on flights to Myrtle Beach, S.C.

They are still offering flights from Manchester for a few more weeks with some very good prices. Otherwise, Spirit Airlines also offers direct flights from Boston to Myrtle Beach. You can even travel to Logan International Airport by bus with Concord Coach Lines from the Eastern Slope Inn in North Conway. It is a comfortable and convenient way to get to the airport, without dealing with traffic and parking. The bus service brings you directly to the airport terminal.

There are a variety of golf courses and accommodations in Myrtle Beach, they have more ranked golf courses there than any other U.S. destination. The Dunes Golf and Beach Club, Caledonia Golf and Fish Club, True Blue Golf Club, King’s North at Myrtle Beach National, Moorland Course at Legends Resort, Grand Dunes Resort Course and three courses at Barefoot Resort are amongst the best and most challenging courses in the area.

Visit barefootresortvacations.com and visitmyrtlebeach.com for more information on some of the golf courses that Golfweek ranks as Top Resort Courses.

Another great option is Charleston, S.C., with lots of great golf courses and excellent restaurants. If you want to experience southern hospitality at its finest, consider Charleston and enjoy the historical architecture in the downtown area. While you are in Charleston, Kiawah Island is a great day trip to play golf, it is about 45 minutes away. Kiawah Island is also a great destination, relax in low country, South Carolina.

Kiawah Island Resort is world-class and they hosted the 2012 and 2021 PGA Championship. It is a high-end resort that offers world-class accommodations, golf and 10 miles of beaches. The resort is award-winning and recognized with AAA Five Diamond and Forbes Five Stars ratings.

There is also Hilton Head Island in South Carolina, less than one hour from Savannah, Ga. It is one of the premier golf destinations in the country. Visit hiltonheadisland.org and consider a stay and play package. This would probably save you money on greens fees. The golf courses there are very good, the prices vary by course. There are fewer crowds, the temperatures in October-November are in the 60s and low 70s during the day. That is great weather to play golf, especially since we are used to cooler temperatures in northern New Hampshire.

Continuing further south into Georgia, Jekyll Island offers four golf courses, three of which are municipal courses and affordable. If you are looking for a quiet getaway, with peace and serenity, this might be the perfect place for you to enjoy golfing and relaxing. Check out www.jekyllisland.com for more information.

If you can get away for a trip to the warmer weather, you should be able to find some deals since this is a quiet time for these areas before Thanksgiving week. Enjoy reading up on these areas and consider even a long weekend or better yet a midweek getaway over the next few weeks. Lodging rates drop, fewer crowds and the golf courses often have midweek specials. Otherwise, put it on your list of things to do in February/March 2022 when the weather warms up again in the South.

The golf season is winding down here in the Mount Washington Valley. Here are some recent results and news from a few of the local golf courses.

Hale’s Location Golf Course, West Side Road, North Conway, (603) 356-2140: Here are the winners of the Three Tee Tournament — first place Mike Albarelli, Barbara Plonski, Scott Matthews and Cathy Steesy. Second place Ed Chappee, Suzanne McCarthy, Tom Proulx and Mary Jane Proulx.

Lake Kezar Country Club, Route 5, Lovell, Maine, (207) 925-2462: Recently, Friends of Conway Rec held its golf tournament. It was a good turnout, with prizes awarded to both men and mixed division.

LKCC held its annual Cross-Country Scramble on Oct. 3. It was a rainy start, but the weather soon cleared. The event had a very interesting format for playing 9 holes. Just an example you tee off on 18 and hole out on 1. The few groups that played had a good time.

The last club event for the season is the Turkey Shoot Scramble on Oct. 17. Call the clubhouse to sign up. Lot’s of turkey-related prizes are awarded.

LKCC will be open until Oct. 31, weather permitting.

Eagle Mountain Golf Course, Carter Notch Road, Jackson, (603) 383-9090: The final week of Don Ho finds the Par Tee team in first place at -25.

Team members sweeping the Spring and Fall competition were Chris Bates, Steve Piowtrow, Rick Storm and Andy Narducci. In second at -18 was the Chislas followed by the Jocular Jewelers in third at -17. The Switchback team and the Marteenies finished tied for fourth place at -14.

Ann Bennett and Chris Bates won the last long drive contest.

Wentworth Golf Club, Route 16, Jackson, (603) 383-9641: The Cross-Country Tournament is scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 24. Anyone interested in bringing a team please call the pro shop.

Indian Mound Golf Course, Center Ossipee, (603) 539-7733: The 13th annual Kennett Hockey Golf Tournament, held on Oct. 10. attracted a record of 30 teams. “It went really well,” reports Indian Mound’s Jonathan Rivers.

North Conway Country Club, Norcross Circle, North Conway, (603) 356-5244: Will be closing for the season on Oct. 31.

Omni Mount Washington, Bretton Woods, (603) 278-4653: The Mount Washington Resort Golf Club offers a variety of lessons and workshops to help golfers of all levels of ability improve their game. All clinic schedules are subject to change due to weather or other factors. Please contact the Pro Shop to book your lesson or for the latest details at (603) 278-GOLF (4653). Please check in at the Pro Shop at least 10 minutes before the start of the lesson.

Thank you to all the local area golf courses and their staff for working hard during this 2021 golf season. It is great that it was a busy season and we had some good weather. And thank you to all the golfers that supported the local golf courses all season.

“If you drink, don’t drive. Don’t even putt.” — Dean Martin

Let us know if you have any great local stories or photos that we can include in an upcoming column. Contact Jim at mcfadyengolf@outlook.com or Lloyd Jones at lloyd@conwaydailysun.com.

Jim McFadyen is a golf columnist and can be reached at mcfadyengolf@outlook.com.

10 Reasons To Fall In Love With Kiawah Island, South Carolina

Kiawah Island is stunning. It is an unspoiled barrier island with an incredible ecosystem that includes 10 miles of pristine beach along the Atlantic coast, a maritime forest, and a labyrinth of saltwater marshes. The ocean, forests, and brackish waterways are home to 300 species of birds, 18 species of mammals, and 30 species of reptiles. There are so many incredible features, it’s hard to accurately describe this unique place located around 25 miles south of Charleston, South Carolina.It was named for the Kiawah Native America...

Kiawah Island is stunning. It is an unspoiled barrier island with an incredible ecosystem that includes 10 miles of pristine beach along the Atlantic coast, a maritime forest, and a labyrinth of saltwater marshes. The ocean, forests, and brackish waterways are home to 300 species of birds, 18 species of mammals, and 30 species of reptiles. There are so many incredible features, it’s hard to accurately describe this unique place located around 25 miles south of Charleston, South Carolina.

It was named for the Kiawah Native Americans. They lived off the land and fished from the ocean long before the colonists arrived in the Carolinas. The history continued with tales of pirates, plantation owners, enslaved people, lumbermen, and investors. Each inhabitant made Kiawah what it is today: a beautifully preserved nature sanctuary that is also a vacation paradise. Fortunately (since 1997), the land is overseen by the Kiawah Conservancy, a group whose mission steers them to balance nature with development so that visitors and residents can enjoy what is truly unique about the setting. Kiawah Island is a 45-minute drive from Charleston airport, has an average temperature that varies from 43 to 88 degrees from winter to summer, and has been my resort of choice for the past 18 years.

Here are 10 reasons to fall in love with Kiawah Island in no particular order. Once you visit, you will return, like I do, again and again.

1. Relax On 10 Miles Of Top-Rated Beach

Kiawah’s shoreline is pristine and consistently ranks amongst the best in the world. Voted one of the top 9 beaches in Charleston by Condé Nast in 2018, it was also voted the second-best island in the world by Condé Nast Traveler in 2019. Its east-west orientation offers a prime spot for viewing sunrises and sunsets. The packed sand allows for recreation, including beach games of all kinds, building sandcastles, and biking along the water’s edge. Since the beach is private, a vacation there requires renting a villa or home through Kiawah Island Golf Resort or booking a stay in The Sanctuary hotel. The Sanctuary is the island’s Forbes 5-star oceanfront accommodation that resembles a seaside mansion. Once you have secured your rental or reservation, you can arrange a setup of beach chairs and toys for maximum enjoyment.

2. Golf At Five Exceptional Public Courses

Kiawah has a global reputation for incredible golf. The site of two previous PGA Championships, Kiawah Island Resort is poised to host the tournament again in 2021 on the Ocean Course. The Ocean Course is regarded as one of the finest golf courses in the world and provides the Atlantic’s views from every hole. When you stay at the resort, you can choose to play five different courses designed by Pete Dye, Jack Nicklaus, Tom Fazio, Gary Player, and Clyde Johnston. The island’s setting and the architect’s challenging designs incorporating the rolling dunes, marshes, and forests make for exciting play. Private instruction and group lessons are available if you want to up your game.

3. Swing A Racquet At A Top U.S. Tennis Resort

Since the late ’70s, the tennis program at Kiawah was built to be one of the best. First under Roy Barth, and now under his son Jonathan, Kiawah Island’s tennis program has remained one of the 50 best U.S. tennis resorts according to Tennis Magazine for thirty years running. The program offers 22 tennis courts, including 10 new Har-Tru clay courts. There are various vacation packages for tennis enthusiasts. But if you are on vacation and just want to play a few times, you can reserve a court, rent or buy equipment, take individual or group lessons, and experience why Kiawah is considered the top tennis resorts in the world.

4. Bike Amongst The Flora And Fauna

It’s easy to rent a bicycle on Kiawah. If you stay at the Sanctuary, the bike pavilion is open for walk-up rentals daily for half-day and full-day options. If you stay at a villa or home, you can reserve bicycles for two days or longer by making reservations with the resort. The bikes are dropped off and picked up directly from your accommodations. You can take Kiawah bikes on the beach to ride on the hard-packed sand, which is a ton of fun. You can also steer them along 30 miles of paved bicycle trails. If there is no trail, you may have to ride on a road (helmets are available with rentals free of charge by request). Along the way, there towers that allow you to look over the marshes and view birds and wildlife in their natural habitat.

5. Nature Programs Connect You To The Natural World

One thing that sets Kiawah apart from other resorts is its nature programs. There is something for everyone, from youngest to oldest and in-between. If you are active, there are kayaking, paddling, and fishing excursions. Some seasons even offer 5Ks, polar plunges, or triathlons. If you are artistic, there are painting, photography, and other creative classes. Yoga on the beach? Surf camp? Shelling? Yes, all that and more. And there is a daily newsletter you can read to discover what to see (nature-wise) while staying at the resort.

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6. Get Pampered At Sanctuary Spa

The Spa at The Sanctuary offers even more relaxation, if that is possible. There are single or full-day services available at their luxurious facility. There are combination sessions where you start the day with a personal training meeting and then get a relaxing massage or other treatments. There are couples therapies and salon experiences, including manicures and pedicures available at the spa. When you book a service, you are welcome to relax in the whirlpool, sauna, and steam room on the day of your treatment for as long as you want to linger.

7. Enjoy Casual And World-Class Dining

Dining on Kiawah offers vacationers a variety of choices. If you rent your own villa or home, you might want to make some meals, especially if you enjoy cooking. The resort program will have groceries delivered to your resort accommodation before your arrival, if you prefer. The Town Center Market at East Beach serves casual meals and has provisions for sale. If you need eggs, milk, bread, snacks, or sandwich fixings, you can find them here. For prepared meals, dine-in, pick-up, or delivery for breakfast, lunch, or dinner selections is available. There are also bottles of wine or beer and Kiawah Island logo merchandise for sale. Other dining options include a dozen eateries, including elegant and casual restaurants as well as poolside and outdoor cafes. Resort guests enjoy charging privileges and door-to-door ride service to any of the restaurants on the resort. The fare ranges from Lowcountry cuisine, Italian, steaks, and BBQ to the freshest seafood imaginable. The dining choices at Freshfields Village, just outside Kiawah Island Resort’s gates, offer additional restaurants to choose from and a full supermarket.

8. Shopping Steps Away From Your Room

The lobby-level promenade in The Sanctuary hotel offers exciting shopping in a relaxed setting, but there are various shops throughout the resort. The Sanctuary shops include The Golf Shop and different boutique stores that sell signature clothing for every family member. If you don’t have time to relax at the spa, the shop has lovely items to bring the relaxation home with you. The Wells Gallery represents a variety of artists from around the area and the globe in various mediums. The gallery specializes in works of art that celebrate Kiawah Island. The Heron Park Nature Center Island Outpost offers apparel by Patagonia, field guides, children’s toys, locally made or environmentally responsible gift items, and more. Just outside the gates of Kiawah Island Resort, Freshfields Village has terrific shopping from sporting goods to home decor and clothing.

9. Special Events Make For A Memorable Vacation

During the summer, there are daily special events with themes and entertainment. On the Fourth of July, the all-day celebration of food, games, and fun concludes with a breathtaking fireworks show. One favorite summer event that occurs every Monday evening from Memorial Day to Labor Day is the Mingo Point Oyster Roast and BBQ. Fresh roasted oysters, a full Lowcountry boil, and southern BBQ, plus a sunset over the Kiawah River and dancing under the moonlight to live music is a popular event. There is nothing better. Holidays are also special celebrations at the resort. Check the website for more information about how to book and what to look forward to for Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Eve.

10. Charming Charleston Is A Short Drive Away

Charleston, South Carolina, has been voted the number one city in the United States by Travel + Leisure for the past seven years. It is one of the oldest, most inviting, and romantic places to visit. Take a horse-drawn carriage ride or stroll down the cobblestone streets to explore the antebellum architecture south of Broad Street and the pastel homes along Rainbow Row. The history, the food, the harbor, and the vibe all make Charleston a great stop while visiting Kiawah Island. You can book tours right from the concierge. Or make a plan to visit before or after your stay on the island. One thing is sure you must make a visit to the Holy City when you stay on Kiawah.

Pro Tips

The best time to visit Kiawah and Charleston is the fall. Tourists love to flock to these areas from April to October because of the weather and the beaches. I always stayed on Kiawah in July or August due to school schedules, but it’s sweltering and can be buggy. The spring is also a beautiful time, and the blooms are glorious. The Charleston Tea Garden makes for a fun day trip. You can spend a few hours learning how tea is processed and produced at this location. Another popular attraction is the Angel Oak, a local treasure that must not be missed.

Editor’s Note: Considering Hilton Head instead? Here’s our comparison between Hilton Head and Kiawah Island.

Some Kiawah Island businesses see boost from PGA Championship, others say ‘it’s a letdown’

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Many business owners and managers on Kiawah Island said Thursday they have seen more customers and more dollars coming into their shops and restaurants because of the PGA Championship.“A lot of foot traffic on and off the island and a lot of interest in terms of dining. It’s been great,” FortyEight Wine Bar And Kitchen’s Matthew Williams said.“More people out and about and less restrictions, so people are more willing to shop, spend some money and have a little fun,&rdq...

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Many business owners and managers on Kiawah Island said Thursday they have seen more customers and more dollars coming into their shops and restaurants because of the PGA Championship.

“A lot of foot traffic on and off the island and a lot of interest in terms of dining. It’s been great,” FortyEight Wine Bar And Kitchen’s Matthew Williams said.

“More people out and about and less restrictions, so people are more willing to shop, spend some money and have a little fun,” Margerite and Motte owner Laura Reed said.

Business owners welcomed golf fans with sales, extended hours, and more.

“We’re just trying to capitalize and just get the names out there of local, women-owned businesses, and it’s been a really great day already and it’s Thursday, so we expect the weekend to be super busy,” Noddy owner Helen Tucker said.

Some longtime business managers said this year’s event has exceeded their expectations compared to the PGA Championship’s last appearance on Kiawah Island in 2012.

“In 2012, they didn’t have a lot of infrastructure around here, not as much rather…so that allowed people to go off island in 2012. They would actually just drive by us after the tournament and go to West Ashley or downtown,” Hege’s Restaurant General Manager Scott Hudson said. “But with us this year, we’ve seen a very positive uptick. We were expecting 20 percent, but we are seeing actually a 25 to 30 percent increase.”

However, a bit further off Kiawah Island, other business owners said the event has been a bust after they increased staffing to prepare for what they expected to be a rush of customers this week.

“We’ve been excited about this since we opened in November 2019, and people have been asking us about it for that long,” The Hemingway owner Michael Norwood said. “It’s been a little bit of a letdown.”

Some think traffic from the PGA Championship may be to blame for driving their typical customers past their doors or away from the area altogether.

“People that are renting their houses, I’m sure, just stocked up on groceries, and they don’t want to leave the island because traffic is just a mess out here,” Kinfolk owner Kevin Nierstedt said. “It was just really hard to judge this week. It’s been good business but it’s hard to plan for.”

The true economic impact of the PGA Championship is still unknown with three full days of golf left.

A study from the College of Charleston had estimated a $200 million gain for the Charleston area before the coronavirus pandemic limited capacity on Kiawah Island’s Ocean Course.

Half of that was expected to come from direct spending, and it’s unclear just how those limited spectator numbers have changed the estimate.

Meanwhile, the other $100 million value from the projection was set to come from the media and marketing coverage for the event, and officials said that has not changed based on the spectator count.

Kiawah Island’s beauty is being broadcast all over the world with more than 175 hours of live coverage of the PGA Championship.

“It’s a public golf course. So, it’s something that you can watch the best players in golf come compete, and then you can come out and try it yourself,” Championship Director Ryan Ogle said. “To be able to be inclusive like that is a feather in our cap to host our championship at a public golf course.”

Bryan Hunter, the public relations manager for Kiawah Island Golf Resort, believes the exposure gained from the event will pay off for the Lowcountry’s tourism industry.

“The importance of tourism to the entire region economically and having the eyes of the world on, not only Kiawah Island, but on Charleston and the entire Lowcountry and seeing how beautiful it is…I think people will see it and say that looks like the kind of place I want to go visit,” Hunter said. “I think it will have a big impact for a lot of different reasons but certainly the tourism industry in Charleston.”

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