Gutter Cleaning in
Kings Mountain SC

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The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in Kings Mountain, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in Kings Mountain.

Service Areas

Gutter Cleaning in Kings Mountain, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

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Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

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Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

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Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

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Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in Kings Mountain for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in Kings Mountain, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

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Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

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Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

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Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

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Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in Kings Mountain, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

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At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in Kings Mountain, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in Kings Mountain:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in Kings Mountain. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
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Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in Kings Mountain, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in Kings Mountain, SC:

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Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
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Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
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Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
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Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
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Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
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Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in Kings Mountain

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in Kings Mountain. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

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Latest News in Kings Mountain

Seventeen women, four men presented at Shelby Debutante Ball

Seventeen young women and four young men from Cleveland County and surrounding areas were presented to society in The Junior Charity League of Shelby’s Annual Debutante Ball, held Saturday, June 19, 2021.The weekend’s activities began Friday afternoon with Debutante Registration at The LeGrand Center. Friday evening included a dinner for the Debutantes, Honor Marshals and their guests at The LeGrand Center. Parents of the Debutantes and Honor Marshals attended a Parent Dinner and Social at The LeGrand Center. Both were cat...

Seventeen young women and four young men from Cleveland County and surrounding areas were presented to society in The Junior Charity League of Shelby’s Annual Debutante Ball, held Saturday, June 19, 2021.

The weekend’s activities began Friday afternoon with Debutante Registration at The LeGrand Center. Friday evening included a dinner for the Debutantes, Honor Marshals and their guests at The LeGrand Center. Parents of the Debutantes and Honor Marshals attended a Parent Dinner and Social at The LeGrand Center. Both were catered by Dressing on the Side.

Debutantes and their Chief Marshals were honored Saturday morning with a Father-Daughter Brunch at Cleveland Country Club. A Mothers Brunch was held Saturday at Pfeiffer Café and Confections.

The formal presentation and figure presentation of the Debutantes was held at 8 p.m. at The LeGrand Center, followed by the Debutante Reception. The event included the Debutantes, Honor Marshals, Chief Marshals, Assistant Marshals, mothers and invited guests. Music for the evening was provided by the Frank Love Orchestra. The commentator for the event was Dr. Rick Hamrick.

Mrs. David McBeth served as the chair for this year’s Debutante Ball along with co-chair Mrs. Trevor McDaniel. Ms. Meredith Royster served as secretary to the Debutantes and Honor Marshals.

The annual event allows the Junior Charity League of Shelby to continue its service to Cleveland County’s children through the Clothing Room and Kids on the Block projects.

During the 2020-2021 school year, the Junior Charity League’s Clothing Room provided clothing and a warm coat to 450 children in need. Also, Cleveland County’s third-grade elementary students were presented a program through the use of the Kids on the Block puppets on such delicate subjects as child abuse, divorce, drug awareness, bullying, and mental and physical disabilities.

The first three young ladies are daughters of a Junior Charity League member:

Miss Victoria Lynn Grenier of Shelby is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Christopher James Grenier (Mrs. Sherry Barnette Grenier, League Member) and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Roger Barnette of Shelby and Ms. Maureen Lipsett Grenier of Vancouver, Canada and the late Mr. Andrew Ross Grenier. Chief Marshal: Mr. Christopher James Grenier; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Tyler James Grenier, brother of the debutante.

Miss Lillian Camille McBeth of Shelby is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Ashley McBeth (Mrs. Leigh Isreal McBeth, League Member) and the granddaughter of Mrs. Cynthia Sabettie McNeil of Cherryville and the late Keith Francis Isreal and Mr. and Mrs. David Albert McBeth of Fort Mill. Chief Marshal: Mr. David Ashley McBeth; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Lukas Ashley McBeth, brother of the debutante.

Miss Sadie Dianna Peeler of Casar is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jeremy Scott Peeler (Mrs. Ashley Brackett Peeler, League Member) and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roger Neal Brackett of Casar and Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Fay Peeler of Lincolnton. Chief Marshal: Mr. Jeremy Scott Peeler; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Lathan Scott Peeler, brother of the debutante.

Miss Caitlin Brianna Ahern of Oak Ridge is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Brian Michael Ahern and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dallas C. Abee Jr. of Hickory and Ms. Diana G. Ahern of Greenville, S.C. Chief Marshal: Mr. Brian Michael Ahern; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Vincent Joseph Cagno, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sal Cagno of Oak Ridge.

Miss Kathryn Rose Allen of Shelby is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Ray Allen Sr. and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Stephen Ledford of Shelby and Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Stevenson Tant of Zebulon and Mrs. Hazel Harrill Allen and the late Mr. Andrell Donald Allen of Shelby. Chief Marshal: Mr. David Ray Allen Sr.; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Michael Stephen Allen, brother of the debutante.

Miss Morgan Nicole Baynard of Shelby is the daughter of Mr. Andrew Thomas Baynard of Waxhaw and Ms. Nicole Greene Baynard of Shelby and the granddaughter of Mr. Nicholas Matthew Greene and the late Mrs. Janis Worthy Greene and Mrs. Donnis G. Baynard and the late Mr. Jimmy Lee Baynard all of Shelby. Chief Marshal: Mr. Andrew Thomas Baynard; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Andrew Cole Baynard, brother of the debutante.

Miss Allie Jayne Blackburn of Lincolnton is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Morris Blackburn and the granddaughter of Mrs. Allie Sue Lail and the late Mr. Paul Lewis Lail and the late Mr. and Mrs. John William Blackburn all of Lincolnton. Chief Marshal: Mr. John Morris Blackburn; Assistant Marshal: Mr. William Paul Blackburn, brother of the debutante.

Miss Emma Louise Bridges of Casar is the daughter of Mr. Charles Wayne Bridges Jr. and Ms. Tracy Waters Bridges and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dewey Roberts of Casar and the late Mr. Elijah Waters IV and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wayne Bridges of Polkville. Chief Marshal: Mr. Charles Wayne Bridges Jr.; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Matthew Dillon Bridges, brother of the debutante.

Miss Kelssie Jane Cook of Cherryville is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Wayne Cook and and Dr. Jennifer Cease Wall and Mr. David Wall and the granddaughter of Mr. William Magnus Cease III of Richmond, Va., and the late Mrs. Reba Huss Cease and Mr. Wayne Cook of Cherryville and the late Mrs. Myra Jane Black. Chief Marshal: Mr. Michael Wayne Cook; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Gavin Hall Cease, brother of the debutante.

Miss Georgia Ray Dellinger of Iron Station is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Clark Dellinger and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rufus Jackson Moss Jr. of Cherryville and Mr. and Mrs. George Luther Dellinger of Iron Station. Chief Marshal: Mr. George Clark Dellinger; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Alvaro Emanuel Montenegro, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jose Montenegro of Maiden.

Miss Bailey Rachel Ledford of Kings Mountain is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Harold Ledford and the granddaughter of Mrs. Martha Cash of Kings Mountain and the late Mr. Kenneth Cash and the late Mr. and Mrs. Harold Ledford. Chief Marshal: Mr. Jeffrey Harold Ledford; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Daniel H. Carley, son of Dr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Carley of Kings Mountain.

Miss Keely Nicole Marlowe of Mooresboro is the daughter of Dr. Amy B. and Mr. Paul David Marlowe and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Max Bridges and Mr. and Mrs. Wade Rex Marlowe, all of Mooresboro. Chief Marshal: Mr. Paul David Marlowe; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Bryson Paul Marlowe, brother of the debutante.

Miss Katherine Elizabeth Martin of Kings Mountain is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Conrad Francis Martin and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Dover of Kings Mountain and Mr. Conrad Martin Sr. of Saugerties, N.Y. and the late Mrs. Angela Martin. Chief Marshal: Dr. Conrad Francis Martin; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Jeb Walter Bridges, son of Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Edgar Bridges of Lawndale.

Miss Emerald Grace Price of Casar is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bobby Curtis Price and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Billy Ray Smith of Casar and Mrs. Della Price and the late Mr. Bobby Haynes Price of Shelby. Chief Marshal: Mr. Bobby Curtis Price; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Peyton Russell Norman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Dwayne Norman of Lincolnton.

Miss Laney Michelle Qualls of Shelby is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alan Drew Qualls and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Eugene Latham and the late Mr. and Mrs. David Alfred Qualls Jr. all of Shelby. Chief Marshal: Mr. Alan Drew Qualls; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Charles Thomas Qualls, brother of the debutante.

Miss Alexandra Chastain Ruch of Oak Ridge is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Charles Ruch and the granddaughter of Mr. John Boyd Long Jr. and the late Mrs. Judy Chastain Long of Shelby and Mrs. Margery Ann Ruch and the late Mr. Gary Charles Ruch of Statesville. Chief Marshal: Mr. Benjamin Charles Ruch; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Caden Wallace Ulmer, son of Dr. and Mrs. Larry Edward Ulmer II of Greensboro.

Miss Morgan Leigh Walker of Lawndale is the daughter of the Doctors David and Tonya Walker and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Okuskzi of Fallston and the late Mr. and Mrs. Charles Raeford Wright of Fallston and Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Cletus Walker of Lawndale. Chief Marshal: Dr. David Raymond Walker; Assistant Marshal: Mr. Jules Camden Walker, brother of the debutante.

Honor Marshals are sons of a Junior Charity League Member:

Mr. Liston Turner Brooks of Shelby is the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Rex Brooks, Jr. (Mrs. Katherine Turner Brooks, League Member) and the grandson of Dr. and Mrs. Philip Elliot Turner of Shelby (Mrs. Suzanne Ramsey Turner, Sustaining League Member) and Mr. and Mrs. David Rex Brooks Sr., of Battleboro.

Mr. Graham Alexander Costner of Shelby is the son of Mr. Mitchell Prentice Johnson and Ms. Cynthia Sherman Johnson (League Member) and the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Prentice Johnson (Mrs. Martha Johnson, Sustaining League Member) of Shelby and the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sherman of Cherryville and Mr. Thomas Costner and the late Mrs. Brenda Costner of Boiling Springs.

Mr. Christopher Michael Harakas of Shelby is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Andrew Peter Harakas (Norma Porter Harakas, League Member) and the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Earl Porter of Newsoms, Virginia and the late Mr. and Mrs. Peter Harakas of Charlotte.

Mr. Tate Matthew Smart of Shelby is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Wayne Smart (Mrs. Sara Puckett Smart, League Member) and the grandson of Mrs. Walter Harry Puckett Jr. and the late Mr. Walter Harry Puckett and Mr. and Mrs. James Ervin Smart all of Shelby.

Hike and Explore Historic Glenn Springs, SC

Have you visited Glenn Springs, SC? This historic community was once known for its healing mineral spring and historic figures who were known to visit the spring. You can explore the area on foot with a hike or a driving tour. Kidding Around Contributor, Liene, visited with her family. From animals along the trail, to historic buildings and stories of the area; here’s what they discovered in Glenn Springs, SC. The country roads in the Upstate hold all sorts of secrets: old battlefields, Native American sites, drive-up m...

Have you visited Glenn Springs, SC? This historic community was once known for its healing mineral spring and historic figures who were known to visit the spring. You can explore the area on foot with a hike or a driving tour. Kidding Around Contributor, Liene, visited with her family. From animals along the trail, to historic buildings and stories of the area; here’s what they discovered in Glenn Springs, SC.

The country roads in the Upstate hold all sorts of secrets: old battlefields, Native American sites, drive-up movie theaters and quirky stores… Americana from a by-gone era, and modern-day wayside stops. On our recent hike with the South Carolina 7 Expedition we found ourselves in Glenn Springs, SC, an unincorporated community in Spartanburg County, and what we discovered there was a lot of history for such a little place!

The Mineral Springs in Glenn Springs, SC

Not far from present-day Pauline, SC, there is a spring. The waters from this spring are said to have healing properties, and for over one hundred years were visited by people who came to enjoy their waters. According to the Glenn Springs Preservation Society, it was a Cherokee medicine man that discovered the mineral properties of the spring.

Later, legend has it that soldiers returning from the Revolutionary War with various skin ailments came to the spring for its healing powers after finding that the minerals in the mud cleared up their health issues. Even George Washington was said to have stopped there to try the waters on a trip to neighboring Georgia. Recent water analysis shows calcium, sulfur and magnesium compounds, lending credence to the idea that the water had special properties.

In the late 18th century, the springs and the land around them were granted to a Henry Storey by the king, and then in 1825, John B. Glenn bought the land and opened an inn. The inn was so popular that ten years later a large hotel was built, one that quickly gained a reputation for elegance and comfort – and of course the water. A bottling facility was constructed, and at one point a railroad connected the inn to Roebuck, SC.

J W Bell owned Glen Springs from the 1930s until 1970. When the hotel burned down in the 1940s, it was never rebuilt, but the J W Bell Company in Spartanburg kept bottling the spring water in gallon glass bottles, 12,000-15,000 cases a year being shipped throughout the US and Europe until the Great Depression.

Glenn Springs, SC Today

While you will not find a bottling plant or fancy hotel, the Glenn Springs Historic District and Williams Place are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. If your family is interested in visiting, here is what you need to know!

Your first stop should be the Old Stone Church (3700 Glenn Springs Road). Built in 1908, the property was restored by the Glenn Springs Preservation Society in 2013, the old stone church is now an event and community center. The neighboring wooden building was originally the Cates Store, used as a Sunday school building until 1961.

The wooden kiosk at the site has plenty of information on the area, as well as driving tour brochures that feature 23 historic structures, most on the National Register of Historic Places.

Take the Glenn Springs Driving Tour

The brochure features a list of the Glenn Springs sights, including whether it is still standing, the address, and if it is on the National Register of Historic Places. The hotel was located near the Old Stone Church site, as is the spring – the entrance to the original springs and the bottling plant was off what is current-day Boys Home Road, across from the Episcopal Cemetery.

Also on the tour is the Browning Home, which was haunted by resident ghost “Willie” who would knock over floor lamps and turn on radios until he was asked to leave in 1992. Nearby Camp Hill got its name after British Army Major Patrick Ferguson and his loyalist militia camped on the site in 1780, prior to their defeat by Patriots at the Battle of Kings Mountain, and today features a Greek Revival style house built in the 1830s.

The Storey Cabin, built by Henry Storey after he obtained the land grant from King George III in the 1750s, is located near a second spring (that feeds Storey Creek) and is still owned by the Storey family. The Old Jail House could hold two people, and was once a stagecoach stop before being used for storage, and the Glenn Springs Post Office (and saddler’s shop) has been restored and moved to the very center of historic Glenn Springs.

Glenn Springs Passage of the Palmetto Trail: Go on a hike

The Post Office can be accessed from a parking lot at 3670 Glenn Springs Road. This is the parking area for the Glenn Springs Passage of the Palmetto Trail, which connects Croft State Park to Stagecoach Road. The Passage is unique in that it traverses mostly private property, in contrast to most of the Palmetto Trail which is located on state and federal public lands.

From the parking area, follow the connector trail behind the kiosk for a third of a mile to reach the Palmetto Trail. From this point it is a little over 3 miles north to Croft Park, or 4 miles south to Stagecoach Road. For more information on parking and the trail, please visit the Palmetto Trail Glenn Springs Passage page.

We found the hike to be easy to moderate, though it did involve walking along roadsides for short distances, not ideal for children. Mountain bikes are allowed on most of the trail, and there is a bypass for the section that doesn’t. Highlights for us were the farm animals we saw (chickens, goats) on the farm next to the trail on the south end of the Passage, historic Glenn Springs, and Mineral & Storey Branch creeks.

Things to Do Near Glenn Springs

Glenn Springs provides a great stop during a day of exploration in Spartanburg County. Old Stone Church could be a great picnic spot, while the driving tour offers an opportunity to rest after a hike. A short drive away are several other attractions:

Walnut Grove Plantation is just 15 minutes away in Roebuck. In addition to the home and outlying buildings, visitors can also view the property’s cemetery and walk a nature trail, or enjoy a picnic at the pavilion. Walnut Grove Plantation recounts how free and enslaved people settled the South Carolina Backcountry, fought for independence, and built a new nation.

Once an army training base, Croft State Park covers more than 7,000 acres of rolling, wooded terrain just a few miles from downtown Spartanburg. The Park offers over 20 miles of biking and hiking trails, a playground, picnicking and camping, as well as fishing and boating in one of two lakes. 20 minutes north of Glenn Springs is Glendale Shoals Preserve, featuring a 1928 pedestrian bridge, trails, mill ruins and gardens.

Catawba Two Kings Casino opens in Kings Mountain

As Catawba Nation Tribe Chief Bill Harris gazed into the crowd, he gave an emotional speech to the people of Cleveland County as the city held a ribbon cutting Thursday for the long-awaited Catawba Two Kings Casino in Kings Mountain.“Today is about working together,” said Harris. “It’s also about the future. And that is going to take all of us recognizing that each of us bring something to the table.”Kings Mountain Mayor Scott Neisler said the casino is a good thing for the city beca...

As Catawba Nation Tribe Chief Bill Harris gazed into the crowd, he gave an emotional speech to the people of Cleveland County as the city held a ribbon cutting Thursday for the long-awaited Catawba Two Kings Casino in Kings Mountain.

“Today is about working together,” said Harris. “It’s also about the future. And that is going to take all of us recognizing that each of us bring something to the table.”

Kings Mountain Mayor Scott Neisler said the casino is a good thing for the city because it has provided jobs and much needed income during a time when many have been unemployed and struggling to make ends meet.

“We are here to create jobs for our citizens and for the ones that have been left behind,” said Neisler. “This is a wonderful day for all of us. The unthinkable of having a South Carolina tribe in North Carolina has come to fruition.”

Gus Harrison, who made the short commute from Charlotte, agreed the county needed the casino to bring work opportunities and expects it to provide a huge jolt to the city’s economy. Having spent 30 years working for UPS, Harrison believes he was lucky to have a good job most of his life. Now retired, he is happy for those who were able to gain employment at the casino.

“I was very fortunate back when I started with UPS,” said Harrison. “I was a regular person and by staying there, I grew within the company. This is going to be a positive impact on this area here.”

Neisler relished in the excitement of the day as long lines and eager gamblers waited patiently for doors to open and test their luck at winning the jackpot. But more importantly, Neisler pointed out the casino is a testament of the community working together.

“It’s going to be the premier area to come to,” said Neisler. “I’m here today to thank Catawba Nation. Change is inevitable. You can either embrace it and make it positive or sit back and let it deteriorate things.”

Rica Alexander learned of the casino when her mother called to share the news. She made the drive from Kannapolis and plans to return every chance she gets.

“I said all right momma, we are going,” said Alexander.

Alexander said her slower pace of life has freed up more time, and she sees the casino as an escape from life’s daily hassles.

“It’s a quick getaway and a peace of mind,” said Alexander. “Everyone deserves to better their time. I don’t have small children. Anytime I need a breather, I can come here. This is a getaway from home, and it’s closer than the beach and a lot of places. If I’m off work, I can come and then turn around and go back home.”

While she said she will bring a winning attitude, she understands the game will bring some disappointments.

“My mindset of winning comes and goes,” said Alexander. “Sometimes you are going to lose and sometimes you are going to win. At the end of the day, it is just a game. That’s the way I take it.”

Michelle Moore made the 45-minute trip from Rock Hill, S.C., and said the casino will provide a fun activity close to home.

“I was glad they opened it because most of the time we drive to Cherokee,” said Moore.

It’s been a long time coming as the idea was birthed nearly a decade ago, and Neisler credited Harris for thinking outside of the box. He also sees the casino as a form of solidarity, saying it is his responsibility to pave the way for future generations.

“We want to leave our post better than we came into it,” said Neisler.

The casino is located at 538 Kings Mountain Blvd., and will be open 24/7. It is the first in several phases that will ultimately house slot machines, table games, restaurants and a hotel.

Latrice Williams can be reached at 704-669-3333 and lwilliams6@gannett.com.

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Catawba Nation to Open ‘Pre-Launch’ Two Kings Casino Thursday in North Carolina

The Catawba Nation will hit a major milestone Thursday in its quest to operate a casino. Tribal leaders join with local, state, and federal officials at noon to celebrate the grand opening of a temporary facility that will get the Catawba started in gaming.That’s when the Two Kings Casino Resort “pre-launch facility” will open in Kings Mountain, NC. According to a release issued Tuesday, the temp casino will offer 500 slot machines spread across a 14,700-square-foot gaming area built from 29 modular trailers.B...

The Catawba Nation will hit a major milestone Thursday in its quest to operate a casino. Tribal leaders join with local, state, and federal officials at noon to celebrate the grand opening of a temporary facility that will get the Catawba started in gaming.

That’s when the Two Kings Casino Resort “pre-launch facility” will open in Kings Mountain, NC. According to a release issued Tuesday, the temp casino will offer 500 slot machines spread across a 14,700-square-foot gaming area built from 29 modular trailers.

Besides a snack bar and service bar, Two Kings will also welcome food trucks to the property. The initial casino will be smoke-free, but there will be designated smoking areas outside.

Construction on the temp structure began three months ago. Thursday’s opening will take place nearly a year after the Catawba held a groundbreaking ceremony on the 17-acre site in the North Carolina town roughly 35 miles west of Charlotte.

The “pre-launch” casino will employ 250 people at the onset. In an interview last week with the Rock Hill (SC) Herald, Catawba Assistant Chief Jason Harris said about 25 percent of those workers tribal members, including all of the slot technicians.

Catawba See Casino as Economic Engine

The next phase will begin later this year when construction starts on the permanent facility at the same location. The Catawba plans to invest $273 million in the development of the casino resort. It will take approximately a year for workers to build Two Kings. When complete, it will feature a total of 1,800 slot machines and gaming table seats.

Delaware North, a national gaming operator, is working with the Catawba as a consultant to the project.

Like other tribes that have entered into gaming, the Catawba see it as an economic development opportunity

The resort is expected to employ 2,600, but the residual impact will create thousands more. Officials expect up to 4,000 permanent jobs and up to 5,000 construction jobs in the community.

Two Kings Eight Years in the Making

The Catawba have pursued casino gaming for about eight years. However, the nation failed in efforts to develop one in South Carolina, where the tribe has land near Rock Hill, a Charlotte suburb.

Then, in March 2020, the US Department of the Interior took 17 acres of land in Cleveland County, NC into trust for the tribe, as recognition of the tribe’s ancestral ties to the region.

This past January, the Catawba and North Carolina Gov. Roy Copper agreed on a Class III gaming compact, which Interior officials approved two months later.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians filed a lawsuit to block the casino. That tribe operates two casinos in western North Caroline. A federal judge in the District of Columbia ruled in the Catawba’s favor in April.

At the time, Catawba Chief Bill Harris said the court’s decision proved federal officials were right in taking the land into trust.

The Interior Department righted a historical wrong, allowing the Catawba to achieve the promise of self-determination through economic development,” Harris said in a statement.

EBCI has since filed an appeal.

The Catawba Nation will hit a major milestone Thursday in its quest to operate a casino. Tribal leaders join with local, state, and federal officials at noon to celebrate the grand opening of a temporary facility that will get the Catawba started in gaming.

That’s when the Two Kings Casino Resort “pre-launch facility” will open in Kings Mountain, NC. According to a release issued Tuesday, the temp casino will offer 500 slot machines spread across a 14,700-square-foot gaming area built from 29 modular trailers.

Besides a snack bar and service bar, Two Kings will also welcome food trucks to the property. The initial casino will be smoke-free, but there will be designated smoking areas outside.

Construction on the temp structure began three months ago. Thursday’s opening will take place nearly a year after the Catawba held a groundbreaking ceremony on the 17-acre site in the North Carolina town roughly 35 miles west of Charlotte.

The “pre-launch” casino will employ 250 people at the onset. In an interview last week with the Rock Hill (SC) Herald, Catawba Assistant Chief Jason Harris said about 25 percent of those workers tribal members, including all of the slot technicians.

Catawba See Casino as Economic Engine

The next phase will begin later this year when construction starts on the permanent facility at the same location. The Catawba plans to invest $273 million in the development of the casino resort. It will take approximately a year for workers to build Two Kings. When complete, it will feature a total of 1,800 slot machines and gaming table seats.

Delaware North, a national gaming operator, is working with the Catawba as a consultant to the project.

Like other tribes that have entered into gaming, the Catawba see it as an economic development opportunity

The resort is expected to employ 2,600, but the residual impact will create thousands more. Officials expect up to 4,000 permanent jobs and up to 5,000 construction jobs in the community.

Two Kings Eight Years in the Making

The Catawba have pursued casino gaming for about eight years. However, the nation failed in efforts to develop one in South Carolina, where the tribe has land near Rock Hill, a Charlotte suburb.

Then, in March 2020, the US Department of the Interior took 17 acres of land in Cleveland County, NC into trust for the tribe, as recognition of the tribe’s ancestral ties to the region.

This past January, the Catawba and North Carolina Gov. Roy Copper agreed on a Class III gaming compact, which Interior officials approved two months later.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians filed a lawsuit to block the casino. That tribe operates two casinos in western North Caroline. A federal judge in the District of Columbia ruled in the Catawba’s favor in April.

At the time, Catawba Chief Bill Harris said the court’s decision proved federal officials were right in taking the land into trust.

The Interior Department righted a historical wrong, allowing the Catawba to achieve the promise of self-determination through economic development,” Harris said in a statement.

EBCI has since filed an appeal.

As Kings Mountain casino approaches opening, a quarter of employees hired are Catawba

Jason Harris, assistant Chief of the Catawba Indian Nation, grew up in Kings Mountain, N.C.When he was growing up there, the Catawba aboriginal lands were unoccupied and not part of the original Catawba Indian Land Trust, which established the Catawbas reservation in Rock Hill, S.C. But historians say the Catawbas once occupied most of the Piedmont area of the Carolinas, which includes Kings Mountain.A 16.57-acre parcel...

Jason Harris, assistant Chief of the Catawba Indian Nation, grew up in Kings Mountain, N.C.

When he was growing up there, the Catawba aboriginal lands were unoccupied and not part of the original Catawba Indian Land Trust, which established the Catawbas reservation in Rock Hill, S.C. But historians say the Catawbas once occupied most of the Piedmont area of the Carolinas, which includes Kings Mountain.

A 16.57-acre parcel of the Kings Mountain land now has been placed in trust of the Catawbas by the U.S. Department of Interior, and a casino and gambling facility are being built there.

Last week, Harris walked around the sprawling construction site, which will become the Catawba Two Kings Casino Resort. The project is named for the 18th century Catawba Chief King Hagler and the city of Kings Mountain, tribe representative Laney Buckley explained.

It’s a project that Catawba Chief Bill Harris (a third cousin of Jason Harris) has described as “righting historical wrongs,” because it will help restore the tribe’s control over some of its land and help them be more self-sustaining.

A temporary facility with 500 slot machines is projected to open July 1, said Chuck Kilroy, the lead consultant on the project. It will be the first step to what will eventually be the complete casino and resort.

Kilroy said that of 250 employees hired so far, a quarter are Catawbas.

All of the slot-machine technicians are Catawba. He said he hopes to continue this hiring pattern.

Plans for the casino were first announced in 2013.

“We’re definitely ready for this,” Jason Harris said.

“This project is going to be a great benefit for Catawba citizens,” Kilroy said.

The unemployment rate of the Catawba Nation, as calculated in April 2020 , was 13.8% and is more than three times the unemployment rate of North and South Carolina, tribal representatives testified in a petition to the Department of Interior. The median household income is around $30,000 according to these documents.That’s about 30% below the median income in both Carolinas.

The Catawba’s business plan showed the casino is projected to generate $72 million in revenue in its first year, and $150 million by its fifth year.

“With the revenue from the casino, we’ll be able to afford more housing, more healthcare, more education opportunities, and the list goes on and on. Providing more economic development for the tribe… It’s going to change the lives of Catawba today and the Catawba of the future,” Jason Harris said.

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