Gutter Cleaning in
Lancaster SC

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The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in Lancaster, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in Lancaster.

Service Areas

Gutter Cleaning in Lancaster, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

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Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

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Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

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Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

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Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in Lancaster for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in Lancaster, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

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Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

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Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

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Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

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Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in Lancaster, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

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At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in Lancaster, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in Lancaster:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in Lancaster. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
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Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in Lancaster, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in Lancaster, SC:

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Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
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Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
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Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
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Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
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Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
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Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in Lancaster

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in Lancaster. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

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Latest News in Lancaster

Hung jury leads to mistrial in case of ill treatment of animals in Lancaster County, S.C.

LANCASTER COUNTY, S.C. (WBTV) - A hung jury led to a mistrial in a South Carolina case where two people were arrested and 26 dogs were seized following an investigation in Lancaster County.Steppes Stagvelt Starwolf, 63, and Stevie Jenna Starwolf, 53, were arrested and charged with ill treatment of animals, which carries a sentence of 180 days to five years in prison and a fine of up to $5,000.On the second day of the trial, the jury was hung so it was declared a mistrial.Although officials say Stevie Jenna never showed u...

LANCASTER COUNTY, S.C. (WBTV) - A hung jury led to a mistrial in a South Carolina case where two people were arrested and 26 dogs were seized following an investigation in Lancaster County.

Steppes Stagvelt Starwolf, 63, and Stevie Jenna Starwolf, 53, were arrested and charged with ill treatment of animals, which carries a sentence of 180 days to five years in prison and a fine of up to $5,000.

On the second day of the trial, the jury was hung so it was declared a mistrial.

Although officials say Stevie Jenna never showed up to court, Steppes’ trial went ahead. Closing arguments happened Wednesday morning.

In the first day of trial, WBTV was told several deputies and a vet were put on the stand to testify about what they saw the day the dogs were taken.

Many spoke about how dirty the house was and how many of the dogs had to be carried out because they didn’t know how to walk.

”It’s almost like they just wanted us to help them,” says Alan Williams, the director of the county’s animal shelter.

Williams gave Cody, one of the dogs left, a nice rub down. It is a ritual they have every day for a year. Cody, Mystic and Maddie are the only dogs left here of over two dozen dogs grabbed from the owners who are charged with abusing them.

”I’ve been doing this off and on for 12 years and that case stuck with me more than any of the rest,” says Williams.

He says it is because of the shape these animals were in.

Williams says many had feces caked in their fur and near their mouths. Some had to learn how to eat and walk again from the mistreatment. Williams, tearing up just talking about it.

”I think we would all know what would have happened if they had stayed where they was at. These dogs were, they were great dogs,” says Williams.

Animal control officers originally responded to a welfare check on the animals believed to be at the home on Pageland Highway in Lancaster.

After no one answered the door at the home, officers saw two trash bags, which were found to have what is believed to be 10 dog carcasses, outside of the home with a foul smell, officers said.

Deputies saw dogs inside the house through the window. Some of them were running loose and others were left in crates.

Officers then obtained a search warrant for the home. Investigators made entry into the home and found 25 Huskies, with three puppies, and a cat.

Six of the adult dogs and two puppies were running loose in the home, and the rest of the dogs were cages, including two cages with two dogs each.

Authorities said some of the cage doors were locked with zip ties and the dogs appeared to have been in the cages for a while, and none of the animals had access to food or water.

Officers said all of the animals appeared to be malnourished, while shavings and fresh and dried urine and feces covered the floor and the bottoms of the cages, and the accumulation of the material prevented some cage doors from being opened.

Most of them have moved on to rescue groups in Virginia.

The three left remain because they need a little more rehabilitation before they can be released for adoption. Williams hoping he will soon be able to give them a loving home.

Steppes Stagvelt Starwolf and Stevie Jenna Starwolf were additionally cited for failing to have the dogs vaccinated for rabies and for failing to bury the dead dogs.

There’s no word on the prosecution’s next move in the case.

Copyright 2020 WBTV. All rights reserved.

Coming Events – Dec. 4, 2021

Toys for Tots collection: The Edward Jones branch office at 8449 Charlotte Highway, Indian Land, is collecting toys from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday through Dec. 15.OneBlood blood drives:Dec. 5, noon-6 p.m., Harrison United Methodist Church (in honor of Joanne Green), 15008 Lancaster Highway, PinevilleDec. 12, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., RedStone 14, 9650 RedStone Drive, Indian LandDec. 14, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Walmart, 805 S.C. 9 Bypass, LancasterTo make an appointment, visit ...

Toys for Tots collection: The Edward Jones branch office at 8449 Charlotte Highway, Indian Land, is collecting toys from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday through Dec. 15.

OneBlood blood drives:

Dec. 5, noon-6 p.m., Harrison United Methodist Church (in honor of Joanne Green), 15008 Lancaster Highway, Pineville

Dec. 12, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., RedStone 14, 9650 RedStone Drive, Indian Land

Dec. 14, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Walmart, 805 S.C. 9 Bypass, Lancaster

To make an appointment, visit www.oneblood.org or call 888-59-BLOOD.

Catawba Connect update: Noon Dec. 6 online via Zoom. Catawba Connect partners want to share what they’ve learned, what work has been done, and what’s next for local COVID-19 relief and recovery. Speakers include Susan DeVenny, Hannah Saeger Karnei and Pam Temple, all with the Arras Foundation, and Amber Jackson with United Way of Lancaster County. Register at arrasfoundation.org/covid-19.

American Red Cross blood drives:

Dec. 14, 2:30-7 p.m., Covenant Baptist Church, 165 Craig Manor Road, Lancaster

To make an appointment, visit redcrossblood.org or call 800-733-2767.

Christmas ornaments: The Barr Street High School Foundation is selling commemorative Barr Street High School Christmas ornaments for $10 each. Contact Valerie Belk at VDB@barrstreethigh.com or 803-285-5903. Price does not include shipping and handling. All proceeds benefit the annual BSHSF scholarship fund. Checks should be made payable to BSHS Foundation and sent to P.O. Box 2045, Lancaster SC 29721.

‘A Christmas Carol: A Live Radio Play’: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 4, with a 2 p.m. matinee Dec. 5 in Stevens Theatre at USC Lancaster, 476 Hubbard Drive, Lancaster, and a virtual performance at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 5. The USC Lancaster Players bring the Charles Dickens holiday classic to life as a live 1940s radio broadcast. At the live performances, holiday treats, letters to Santa and a keepsake photo for children for an additional fee of $5 will be offered. Tickets are $12 for children 12 and under and USCL students, $15 for adults and $18 for the virtual performance. Season passes are also available for purchase. For details, call 803-313-7000, text 803-386-8893, or email usclplrs@mailbox.sc.edu.

Winter Native American Art & Craft Sale: 9 a.m. Dec. 4 at the Native American Studies Center, 119 S. Main St., Lancaster. Shop for jewelry, Catawba pottery, baskets, quilts and more one-of-a-kind artwork at the eighth annual sale. Catawba artist Alex Osborn will discuss his work with photography, digital collage and drawing at 11 a.m. Free and open to the public.

Clothes Closet: 9-10 a.m. Dec. 4 at Pleasant Dale Baptist Church, 133 Potter Road, Lancaster.

Christmas in the City and parade: See Lancaster will host its annual Christmas in the City holiday celebration 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Dec. 4 at Lancaster City Hall, 216 S. Catawba St., Lancaster, with free photos with Santa, free family photos and free take-home crafts. The event will also feature a Christmas bazaar 9 a.m.-6 p.m. in the parking lot of City Hall.

The Historic Springs House will host a number of local potters and jewelry makers with refreshments 10 a.m.-3 p.m. The county’s largest Christmas parade begins at 5 p.m. on Main Street, beginning at Springs Street and ending at Williams Street. The city’s festivities wrap up at 7 p.m. with a tree lighting at the Historic Springs House, 201 W. Gay St. The theme for all the city’s Christmas events is “Winter Wonderland.” For details, visit www. lancastercitysc.com or call 803-289-1699.

Christmas Lights in Stevens Park: 6-9 p.m. Dec. 4, sponsored by Kershaw Community Park Council (KCPC). There is no admission, but donations to the KCPC will be accepted and appreciated. Those who donate with a check will have their gift matched by Arras Foundation. Anyone who would like to add to the evening by providing a display should contact kershawpark@gmail.com and leave a name and number.

Heath Springs for the Holidays: 2-5:30 p.m. Dec. 5 at the Ann S. Taylor Municipal Building, 103 Duncan St. Event includes a performance by the Heath Springs Elementary chorus, giant slide, line dancing, hayrides, free family photo booth and tree-lighting. Photo booth opens at 1:30 p.m.

Candlelighting service: 3-4 p.m. Dec. 5 at Immanuel Baptist Church, 1152 Great Falls Highway, Lancaster. Hosted by Hope for Grieving Parents, this service is open to all parents who have lost children. Doves will be released in memory of the children lost. Please practice social distancing and wear a mask. For details, contact Janice Steele at 803-804-9120, Sandy Robinson at 803-804-7245 or Debbie Dunn at 803-288-2801.

Untouchables toy run: The Untouchables Motorcycle Club and Legends Sports Bar will hold its annual toy run Dec. 5. Meet at 1:30 p.m. in the Big Lots parking lot on S.C. 9 Bypass West. Kickstands up at 2 p.m. Last stop is at Legends Sports Bar & Grill, 1384 Old Charlotte Road, Lancaster. For details, call Joe McGriff at 803-416-3516.

Lancaster County college news: Dec. 3, 2021

College newsJohn Eckenrode, of Lititz, graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Science in biology - biomedical sciences from Furman University, Greenville, South Carolina, on May 8, 2021.Samson Hailu, of Lancaster, received a Bachelor of Science in accountancy from Northern Illinois University in June 2021.Benjamin French, of Landisville, graduated in December 2020 with a Bachelor of Arts in media arts production from Emer...

College news

John Eckenrode, of Lititz, graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Science in biology - biomedical sciences from Furman University, Greenville, South Carolina, on May 8, 2021.

Samson Hailu, of Lancaster, received a Bachelor of Science in accountancy from Northern Illinois University in June 2021.

Benjamin French, of Landisville, graduated in December 2020 with a Bachelor of Arts in media arts production from Emerson College, Boston, where the Class of 2020 graduates were honored in a ceremony at Fenway Park on May 2, 2021.

Scott Stephens, of Elizabethtown, received a Bachelor of Science in communication from the University of Utah on May 6, 2021.

Area students were among those who graduated in May 2021 from Coastal Carolina University, Conway, South Carolina. They are Maura Bramlitt, of Landisville; Rebecca Hight, of Lancaster; and Janessa Ocasio, of Mohnton.

Area students were among those who graduated May 22, 2021, from Hamilton College, Clinton, New York. Lily Delle-Levine, of Millersville, received a Bachelor of Arts in government and theatre, magna cum laude with departmental honors in government and theatre. Emmett Orgass, of Lancaster, received a Bachelor of Arts in environmental studies, with departmental honors in environmental studies.

Area students were among those who graduated in May 2021 from Widener University, Chester. They are listed with their hometowns and degrees. Conestoga — Adam Bailey, Bachelor of Science in business administration in finance. Lancaster — Eric Graff, Bachelor of Science in civil engineering; Steven Hollern, Bachelor of Arts in psychology; Alexis Holloway, Bachelor of Science in nursing; Mohini Pradhan, Bachelor of Science in nursing; Hailey Welchans, Bachelor of Science in nursing. Leola — Bradley Strickler, Bachelor of Science in civil engineering. Quarryville — Sarah Moore, Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering.

Elias S. Rhoads, of East Petersburg, was named to the president’s honor roll with a 4.0 GPA for the spring 2021 semester at University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming.

Zachery Tomlinson, of Lancaster, was named to the dean’s list for the spring 2021 semester at Westminster College, New Wilmington.

Lillian Becker, of Elizabethtown, was named to the dean’s list for the spring 2021 semester at Quinnipiac University, Hamden, Connecticut.

Area students were among those named to the president’s list with a 3.9 GPA or higher for the spring 2021 semester at Siena College, Loudonville, New York. The are Antonio Astarita, of Willow Street; and Annamaria Walden, of Lancaster.

Area students were among those named to the dean’s list for the spring 2021 semester at University of the Sciences, Philadelphia. They are listed with their hometowns. Drumore — Sydney Sturgill. East Earl — Vera Wang. East Petersburg — Chandler Johnson. Ephrata — Jasmeen Kaur. Holtwood — Mark Smith. Lancaster — Andreea Glavce, Stuti Joshi, Sabrina Mallozzi, Emily Quan, Haide Sorial. Landisville — Christina Bui. Leola — Ashley Nguyen. Lititz — Emma Arnold, Danielle Jones. Manheim — Brooke Kratz. Millersville — Emily Robb. Mohnton — Hope Coffinberger. Mount Joy — Dylan Zuch. New Holland — Julie Nguyen. Paradise — Kishan Patel. Reinholds — Alec Sherk.

Kayla Eller, of Manheim, was honored with the Outstanding Achievement Award in Environmental Science from the College of Science and Engineering at Wilkes University during commencement in May 2021.

Catherine Yorgey, of New Holland, was inducted in spring 2021 into Phi Sigma Pi honors fraternity at Millersville University, Phi Kappa Phi honor society and the National Society of Leadership & Success.

Area students were among those who recently were initiated into The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi at Millersville University. They are listed with their hometowns. East Petersburg — Adam Bachman. Ephrata — Katherine Maldonado. Lancaster — Briana Boots, Eathyn Brennan, Paula Grannells, Evan Hanzelman, Daniel Lembo, Allison Leonard, Alison Murphy, Katherine Pheysey, Nyeema Roberson. Landisville — Jordan Groff. Lititz — Hermenegildo Blanco. Millersville — Riley Boike, Kyle Coleman, Lindsey Diamond, Carson Gabner, Joseph Pisciotta, Santiago Ramos. New Holland — Catherine Yorgey. Oxford — Michael Raucci. Pequea — Dana Rankin. Willow Street — Brittany Kortright.

Area Lebanon Valley College student-athletes have been named to the Winter/Spring Academic All-Middle Atlantic Conference Team. Louise Nicole Honrade, of Lititz, women’s tennis team. Honrade played at #1 singles and #1 doubles for LVC. She finished with 11 combined victories with four in singles play and seven in doubles. Jacquelyn McBride, of Leola, women's tennis team. McBride played primarily at #2 singles and #1 doubles but also saw action at #1 singles toward the end of the season. She ended the year with 19 combined wins, most on the team, with 10 singles and nine doubles victories.

Email college news items to collegenews@lnpnews.com.

MUSC Lancaster dealing with long wait times, staffing main issue

LANCASTER, S.C. (WBTV) - Hospitals across the country are battling the second COVID-19 surge of the year.The delta variant has left emergency departments slammed with people waiting hours and hours for care.The Medical University of South Carolina’s Lancaster (MUSC Lancaster) hospital is feeling the pressure. In some cases, people were forced to wait 15 hours or more to be seen.Windi Bahl happily played with her service dog after coming back from the VA hospital in Salisbury - where she has been going ever since he...

LANCASTER, S.C. (WBTV) - Hospitals across the country are battling the second COVID-19 surge of the year.

The delta variant has left emergency departments slammed with people waiting hours and hours for care.

The Medical University of South Carolina’s Lancaster (MUSC Lancaster) hospital is feeling the pressure. In some cases, people were forced to wait 15 hours or more to be seen.

Windi Bahl happily played with her service dog after coming back from the VA hospital in Salisbury - where she has been going ever since her experience at MUSC Lancaster’s emergency department.

”For 15 hours I sat there and they don’t check on you. It’s just complete and utter chaos basically,” says Windi Bahl.

Bahl went in after experiencing excruciating pain on her right side.

”I felt forgotten. I definitely felt forgotten,” says Bahl.

It is the same feeling Amanda Bennett felt when she waited for more than 10 hours to be seen for what ended up being a stroke.

”It feels really bad to feel that way especially the fact that after leaving there I was still feeling as bad as I was when I came in,” says Bennett.

Much like other hospitals, at MUSC Lancaster - if you come to the emergency department you are not going to get turned away, but the hospital staff is dealing with what they call bottleneck wait times for three reasons.

Chief Medical Officer Edward McCutcheon says these problems should not discourage anyone from coming to the ED.

”All the hospitals are having the same challenges. There are a lot of factors that are playing into the way we provide care currently, but we are committed to provide the best emergency care,” says McCutcheon.

”It’s distressing right,” says Scott Broome.

MUSC Lancaster CEO Scott Broome’s distress comes from these long wait times people are going through.

”We do our absolute best to manage wait times and we have not been as successful in that these last 10 weeks as I would like,” says Broome.

Staffing issues, less bed usage because of that and more patients both COVID and non-COVID have been eating away at the hospitals wait time track record. Staffing being the biggest issue driving the delays.

Here is how the hospital works:

When someone comes into the emergency department, a person assesses the person’s needs with what is called triage. Triage is when a nurse gets all of the medical information for the person’s sickness or injury so the nurses can know who to treat first. This is all dependent on how bad the injury or sickness.

However, McCutcheon says the people who are coming into the ER do not see what is happening behind the scenes. McCutcheon says ambulances are coming in bringing patients that need immediate care. That is also another reason why the people in the waiting rooms are waiting longer.

Broome says they need to hire more people to fill that 15 percent vacancy.

”The best solution to address the need and the bottle necks that we have and to flow patients through the care process is to have more staff,” he says.

Broome says they are trying to get creative to achieve that. A more condensed hiring process to get people started quicker and requiring all staff to be vaccinated are their top solutions. It is a few things that Broome feels could help improve week by week as COVID continues to change the way hospitals work.

”We’re messaging this as a new normal and we need to learn to operate within this environment,” he says.

MUSC Lancaster is not currently on diversion. According to the Department of Health and Environmental Control’s data, there have 61 percent of hospital beds occupied.

Copyright 2021 WBTV. All rights reserved.

After nearly 100 days, SC mom who gave birth while battling COVID goes home

LANCASTER, S.C. — A local mom of three who gave birth while battling COVID-19 and spent nearly 100 days hospitalized while going weeks without meeting her newborn, is heading home.“It’s been such a long time,” Cierra Chubb said Monday on “Good Morning America.” “Each [of my kids] came up to visit once, but it’s not the same.”Cierra Chubb, of Lancaster County, South Carolina, was hospitalized with COVID-19 in July, while she was around 37 weeks pregnant.Just two days a...

LANCASTER, S.C. — A local mom of three who gave birth while battling COVID-19 and spent nearly 100 days hospitalized while going weeks without meeting her newborn, is heading home.

“It’s been such a long time,” Cierra Chubb said Monday on “Good Morning America.” “Each [of my kids] came up to visit once, but it’s not the same.”

Cierra Chubb, of Lancaster County, South Carolina, was hospitalized with COVID-19 in July, while she was around 37 weeks pregnant.

Just two days after she was admitted to the hospital, she had to undergo an emergency cesarean section because her pregnancy was in distress.

She delivered her third child, a son named Myles, on July 26, two weeks before his due date.

While Myles was born healthy, Cierra Chubb’s condition quickly deteriorated after his birth. She was put on a ventilator and then an ECMO machine, on which she stayed for nearly 30 days, according to her husband, Jamal Chubb, who became the sole caregiver for their three children and documented his wife’s journey on TikTok.

“It’s just one of those things where you’re living life and then all of a sudden everything feels like it’s collapsing,” Jamal Chubb said on “GMA.” “At first I started sharing the story on Tiktok just because I wanted to update people because I kept getting a lot of text messages, and then it grew from updating to informing people on what I’m seeing with COVID firsthand and encouraging people to get vaccinated.”

“It kind of took on a life of its own,” he said, adding that his family has received “so many prayers” from people around the world.

In what Jamal Chubb described as “truly a miracle,” his wife’s condition began to improve over the past two months.

Cierra Chubb, who was not vaccinated when she was diagnosed with COVID-19, was able to walk out of the hospital on Oct. 27. She was cheered on by medical staff who lined the hallways to say goodbye.

“I had been there so long that I’d gotten to know the nursing staff and the respiratory specialists very well, but I wasn’t expecting that there were going to be that many people invested in my wellness,” she said. “It was incredible.”

Her recovery continued at a rehabilitation center -- where she relearned everything from walking to writing -- until Monday, when she was able to go home.

“I’ve been crying in the car all morning on the way up here,” Jamal Chubb said of his final drive from the family’s home to the rehabilitation center. “It is just surreal that this is the last time I’ll have to make this drive and she’ll be home with our family.”

He said his wife’s last words before she was put on a ventilator were, “I’m coming back to my family,” and he put those words on his own social media so he could use them as motivation.

“That’s the hope I held onto as you progressed,” Jamal Chubb said to his wife. “It gave me hope every day to read it because that’s what I knew you wanted to do, you wanted to come back.”

Cierra Chubb said she was amazed at how her husband stepped up as a single dad to their three children, ages 7, 2 and nearly 4 months.

“Raising kids by yourself is just taxing,” she said. “When you get married, you are never expecting to have to do that part on your own, it’s a partnership and Jamal and I have always shared things equally.”

“He’s a very involved dad so I think this jump for him versus maybe your average guy wasn’t that big, but with me being sick on top of it, has to have been exhausting to say the least,” she said. “He’s been a rock star the entire time.”

(WATCH BELOW: Local mom who gave birth days after contracting COVID-19 fighting for life)

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