Gutter Cleaning in
Lancaster SC

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The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in Lancaster, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in Lancaster.

Service Areas

Gutter Cleaning in Lancaster, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

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Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

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Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

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Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

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Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in Lancaster for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in Lancaster, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

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Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

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Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

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Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

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Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in Lancaster, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

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At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in Lancaster, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in Lancaster:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in Lancaster. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
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Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in Lancaster, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in Lancaster, SC:

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Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
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Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
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Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
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Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
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Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
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Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in Lancaster

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in Lancaster. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

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Latest News in Lancaster

\'This is alarming.\' Unvaccinated SC residents prompting new COVID case rise, DHEC says

Jul. 15—South Carolina health officials continue to plead with state residents to get vaccinated against COVID-19 as newly reported statewide cases have jumped by more than 50% over the last three weeks.The state\'s low vaccination rate leaves South Carolina more susceptible to a surge in coronavirus activity recently seen in other state with similarly low rates — especially as the highly transmissible delta variant rapidly spreads, which accounts for more than half of new coronavirus cases nationwide, officials said....

Jul. 15—South Carolina health officials continue to plead with state residents to get vaccinated against COVID-19 as newly reported statewide cases have jumped by more than 50% over the last three weeks.

The state\'s low vaccination rate leaves South Carolina more susceptible to a surge in coronavirus activity recently seen in other state with similarly low rates — especially as the highly transmissible delta variant rapidly spreads, which accounts for more than half of new coronavirus cases nationwide, officials said.

"Unvaccinated people are fueling the pandemic — especially unvaccinated young people," state Department of Health and Environmental Control\'s public health director Brannon Traxler said Wednesday during a media briefing.

As of Thursday, 43.5% of eligible South Carolina residents are fully vaccinated, according to data from DHEC. About 49.3% of eligible residents have received at least one dose, the data show.

"This is alarming," Traxler said. "Three weeks ago, we saw an increase of 7.5% in cases compared to the week before, followed the next week by an 18% increase, and then last week a 58% increase in the number of cases."

The number of patients hospitalized due to the virus also jumped by 39% over that same period, she said.

"We know based on South Carolina and national data that the vast majority of people who are getting hospitalized and dying from COVID-19 are those who are not fully vaccinated," Traxler said. "I cannot stress it enough — COVID-19 is now a vaccine-preventable disease. South Carolinians don\'t need to continue to die and become hospitalized since sick from this disease."

York and Chester counties are among South Carolina counties where cases have started to increase, according to DHEC data.

As of Thursday, the two counties are among 14 of the state\'s 46 counties that are reporting moderate incidence rates, which accounts for 51-200 new cases per 100,000 people in a two-week period, for new COVID-19 cases, according to DHEC data. Just last week, both counties reported low incidence rates.

York County, which has 223,809 vaccine-eligible individuals, has reported 197 new confirmed cases in the last two weeks, DHEC data show. The county has had about 70 cases per 100,000 people in that same period, according to DHEC data. There\'s been a total of 32,412 cases in the county since the pandemic\'s start.

Chester County, which has 27,668 vaccine-eligible people, has reported 18 confirmed cases in the last two weeks, DHEC data show. The county has had about 56 cases per 100,000 people in that time, according to DHEC data. There\'s been 4,299 cases in the county since the start of the pandemic.

"We are very concerned that close contact among unvaccinated people is resulting in the disease spread," Traxler said. "We\'re seeing increasing numbers of young adults becoming ill, even requiring hospitalization."

Lancaster County, which has 78,456 vaccine-eligible residents, is still reporting a low incidence rate.

How quickly is the delta variant spreading in SC?

DHEC officials have identified 12 known cases of the delta variant in South Carolina — two more than last week, Traxler said Wednesday.

However, she insisted there are far more cases of the variant circulating the state. Testing for the delta variant is not a routine part of DHEC\'s COVID-19 testing. The agency sequences a small fraction of randomly selected COVID-19 positive samples for the variant, Traxler said.

Although DHEC\'s data has shown the proportion of delta variants identified in South Carolina is increasing rapidly, the state\'s recent week-to-week increase in overall coronavirus cases cannot solely be attributed to the variant, Traxler said.

"One thing that is likely driving a lot of it is the percentage of unvaccinated people that are in South Carolina and are vulnerable to infection from COVID-19," she said.

Residents should take the same precautions, especially getting vaccinated as soon as possible, outlined throughout the pandemic to protect against the delta and other variants, Traxler said. She said residents who are not vaccinated should wear a mask and avoid close contact with others.

"We are seeing that the vast majority of people who are getting diagnosed with COVID-19 are unvaccinated," she said. "It is not 100%, but it is certainly an overwhelming majority."

York County has the highest percentage of residents fully vaccinated among the three counties. As of Thursday, about 39% of the county\'s 223,809 individuals eligible for a vaccine have received two doses. And 46% have gotten at least one dose, according to DHEC data.

In Lancaster County, 35% of the county\'s 78,456 people eligible for a vaccine have gotten both doses, while 44% have received at least one, DHEC data show.

About 36% of Chester County\'s 27,668 people eligible for a vaccine have gotten both doses. About 41% have gotten at least one, according to DHEC data.

Prepare for Tropical Storm Elsa

S.C. Emergency Management DivisionCOLUMBIA – Residents should finalize their storm preparations ahead of Tropical Storm Elsa. Forecasters with the National Hurricane Center predict portions of South Carolina’s coast will experience tropical storm conditions beginning today and into Thursday morning. Forecasters expect gusty winds, rain, potential for flash flooding and isolated tornados, and an estimated storm surge of 1-2 feet are all possible. The S.C. Emergency Management Division recommends the follow...

S.C. Emergency Management Division

COLUMBIA – Residents should finalize their storm preparations ahead of Tropical Storm Elsa. Forecasters with the National Hurricane Center predict portions of South Carolina’s coast will experience tropical storm conditions beginning today and into Thursday morning. Forecasters expect gusty winds, rain, potential for flash flooding and isolated tornados, and an estimated storm surge of 1-2 feet are all possible. The S.C. Emergency Management Division recommends the following: • Bring in lawn furniture and other loose objects, such as garbage cans, that may become hazards in high winds. • Double check to make sure you have all emergency supplies listed in the South Carolina Hurricane Guide. Include items like hand sanitizer and face masks to guard against COVID-19. • Those along the coast may experience isolated power outages and should prepare keep your cell phones and mobile devices fully charged in case of power outages today. • Have multiple ways to get emergency warnings for your area. Some options include Wireless Emergency Alerts on your mobile phone, NOAA Weather Radio and CodeRED Emergency Notifications. • Utilize the state’s new hurricane preparedness site, hurricane.sc. • Heed warnings issued by local public safety officials. When you hear an official alert, take safety precautions immediately. If you are unable to remain in your home Residents who live in mobile homes or in low-lying areas prone to flooding may need to consider staying elsewhere during the storm. Stay with friends and family as a first option. Go to a motel or hotel, if possible. Emergency shelters will open if necessary. Be aware of potential flash flooding • If there is any possibility of a flash flood, move to higher ground. Do not wait to be told to move. • Do not walk through moving water. Three to 6 inches of moving water can make you fall. If you have to walk in water, walk where the water is not moving. Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you. • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle can be quickly swept away. • Do not ever try to drive around or move barricades that are blocking a street. SCEMD is coordinating with state agencies and ready to respond to Tropical Storm Elsa accordingly.

Tropical Storm Elsa threatens NC, SC coasts with winds and rain. Here’s the forecast

After rumbling through Florida, Tropical Storm Elsa is expected to lash the coastal Carolinas with heavy rain and strong winds starting later today.Elsa was located 65 miles north-northwest of Cedar Key, Florida, and 115 miles west-southwest of Jacksonville, Florida, as of 11 a.m. Wednesday. The storm was moving north at 14 mph with...

After rumbling through Florida, Tropical Storm Elsa is expected to lash the coastal Carolinas with heavy rain and strong winds starting later today.

Elsa was located 65 miles north-northwest of Cedar Key, Florida, and 115 miles west-southwest of Jacksonville, Florida, as of 11 a.m. Wednesday. The storm was moving north at 14 mph with maximum sustained winds of 65 mph. Tropical storm force winds — which range from 39 mph to 73 mph — extend up to 90 miles from Elsa’s center.

Tropical storm conditions could reach parts of the Carolinas starting Wednesday night, forecasters say.

The National Hurricane Center has issued a tropical storm warning from the mouth of the St. Mary’s River in Georgia to the Little River Inlet in South Carolina, which is near the North Carolina border.

A tropical storm watch is in effect from Little River Inlet to Sandy Hook, New Jersey, including coastal North Carolina.

The National Hurricane Center says a tropical storm warning means tropical storm conditions are “expected somewhere within the warning area” and a tropical storm watch means tropical storm conditions are “possible within the watch area.”

Elsa’s winds are most likely to reach South Carolina by 2 a.m. Thursday and North Carolina by 8 a.m. Thursday, the forecast shows.

The storm could dump between 2 and 4 inches of rain on South Carolina’s Lowcountry, with up to 6 inches possible in some areas. Coastal North Carolina could get between 1 and 3 inches with up to 5 inches possible in some areas Wednesday night through Thursday night.

The rain could result in flash and urban flooding, forecasters say.

The mouth of the St. Mary’s River to the South Santee River in South Carolina could see 1 to 2 feet of storm surge.

The eastern part of South Carolina could also see a “few tornadoes” Wednesday night, and the “threat should shift to the eastern Carolinas” on Thursday.

“The risk for this is a little higher close to the coast than well inland,” the S.C. State Climate Office said. “The issue here is that the tornado risk comes in the middle of the night when we’re trying to sleep. So, if you live along our coastal plain, make sure you have a way to be alerted to tornado warnings, have your weather radio or cell phone emergency alerts set up properly and the volume turned up loud enough to wake you up.”

The National Weather Service’s Wilmington Office says an “elevated risk of rip currents through Friday” is also included among the tropical storm’s main threats to the coast.

As of Wednesday morning, there’s a high risk of rip currents along much of the South Carolina coast and parts of the North Carolina coast. Other areas are under a moderate risk of rip currents.

A high risk indicates “life threatening rip currents are likely” and that people should stay out of the water as the surf zone is “dangerous of all levels of swimmers.”

Forecasters have said “interests” elsewhere in the Carolinas should also monitor the storm’s progress.

The NWS’s Wilmington Office said tropical storm warnings could be “expanded away from the coast” later Wednesday because of the storm path’s recent shift west.

“On the forecast track, Elsa will continue to move inland into Florida this afternoon,” the NHC says. “The storm should then move across the southeastern and mid-Atlantic United States through Thursday. Elsa reached hurricane strength Tuesday evening before weakening back to a tropical storm early Wednesday.”

Forecasters say Elsa is expected to weaken Wednesday afternoon and into Thursday as it moves over land.

Elsa’s current path shows it weakening to a tropical depression by 8 a.m. Thursday as it’s over South Carolina.

“We still expect Elsa to make some mischief as it crosses South Carolina tonight and tomorrow morning,” the S.C. climate office said Wednesday. “Our primary concern will be heavy rainfall with a general 2-4 inches of rain falling east of a line stretching roughly from Aiken to Lancaster.”

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper and state emergency management officials said Tuesday that residents in Eastern and Central North Carolina should “be prepared for significant rains and possible flooding.”

“Small changes in the forecast track of a tropical system can mean big changes in storm impacts and rainfall amounts,” state Emergency Management Director Mike Sprayberry said in a release. “That’s why close attention to the forecast for your area is important.”

DHEC Monitors for Harmful Algal Blooms in State Waters, Encourages Swimmers to Stay Clear of Possible Blooms

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:COLUMBIA, S.C.? As swimmers and boaters enjoy the summer on South Carolina’s lakes and rivers, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) continues its program monitoring for harmful algal blooms in the surface waters of natural, untreated rivers and lakes.Algal blooms exist in natural water bodies nearly everywhere and are not unique to South Carolina. They occur when tiny plant-like organisms called algae and cyanobacteria overgrow in rivers, lakes, and oceans. Algal b...

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

COLUMBIA, S.C.? As swimmers and boaters enjoy the summer on South Carolina’s lakes and rivers, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) continues its program monitoring for harmful algal blooms in the surface waters of natural, untreated rivers and lakes.

Algal blooms exist in natural water bodies nearly everywhere and are not unique to South Carolina. They occur when tiny plant-like organisms called algae and cyanobacteria overgrow in rivers, lakes, and oceans. Algal blooms can be associated with foam, scum, or thick layers of algae on the surface of water, and they can look and smell bad. Some algal blooms are formed by toxic organisms that affect the health of people, animals, and the environment. These blooms are called “harmful algal blooms” (HABs). In humans, HABs can cause skin irritation, respiratory illness or abdominal pain.

“Harmful algal blooms are more likely to occur in the summer months when temperatures are warmest,” said Bryan Rabon, manager of DHEC’s Aquatic Science program with the Bureau of Water. “You can’t tell if an algal bloom is harmful just by looking at it, and some blooms can’t be seen because they stay at the bottom of a water body until they’re disturbed. A good rule of thumb is, if you suspect an algal bloom, keep yourself and others, and pets, away from it and enjoy the water in another area where the bloom isn’t present.”

DHEC is currently monitoring two waterbodies in the state for HABs:

“There’s always a potential risk that bacteria or other organisms could make you sick when you’re swimming in natural waters because they aren’t sterile environments,” Rabon said. “That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t enjoy our lakes, rivers and beaches, it just means you should be informed and heed any signs that are posted that notify the public of any current water quality concerns detected by the agency as part of our routine ambient water monitoring.”

DHEC tests ambient water quality, including lakes and rivers, across the state on a monthly basis year-round. Ocean-facing beaches are tested weekly during the summer months, from May 1-October 1. Statewide water sampling stations can be viewed on DHEC’s S.C. Watershed Atlas.

If a waterbody looks discolored, has a foul odor, noticeable algal mats, or dead fish or other animals, it’s advisable to not enter the water or allow pets or animals near that water. Algae blooms can be very fast-growing and become an issue before DHEC has been made aware of them.

If you or your pets encounter waters that possibly contain a HAB, immediately rinse with tap water and try to not let pets lick themselves before they\'re rinsed off. Seek immediate medical attention if illness occurs, for humans or pets.

Visit DHEC’s Harmful Algal Bloom webpage for more information.

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Media Relations

DHEC issues warning as agency monitors potentially dangerous algae blooms

Two lakes already reporting blooms, but officials say the conditions are right for them to form in other bodies of water around South Carolina.COLUMBIA, S.C. — State health officials are warning the public to beware of algae blooms as they head into South Carolina\'s rivers and lakes over the July 4 weekend.The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) reports t...

Two lakes already reporting blooms, but officials say the conditions are right for them to form in other bodies of water around South Carolina.

COLUMBIA, S.C. — State health officials are warning the public to beware of algae blooms as they head into South Carolina\'s rivers and lakes over the July 4 weekend.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) reports that it is monitoring blooms on Lake Whelchel in Cherokee County and Lake Wateree in Kershaw, Fairfield, and Lancaster counties.

The agency added that conditions are right for the blooms to form - and some can be unhealthy for people and animals alike.

“Harmful algal blooms are more likely to occur in the summer months when temperatures are warmest,” said Bryan Rabon, manager of DHEC’s Aquatic Science program with the Bureau of Water. “You can’t tell if an algal bloom is harmful just by looking at it, and some blooms can’t be seen because they stay at the bottom of a water body until they’re disturbed."

He added that the best practice is to stay away from a body of water - and keep pets away from it - if there\'s evidence of such a bloom.

In short, algal blooms are caused by tiny plant-like organisms - algae and cyanobacteria - when they overgrow in rivers, lakes, and oceans. Signs of these can include foam, scum, or thick layers of algae on the surface of the water. They may also smell bad. Other signs of a harmful bloom include dead fish.

As for the blooms currently being watched, the one in Lake Whelchel has exceeded the state\'s water quality standards for microcystins - a type of toxic cyanobacteria. The Gaffney Board of Public Works has issued a water quality advisement and DHEC is working with local authorities as they monitor the situation.

The bloom in Lake Wateree is the result of Lyngbya wollei. DHEC reports that while the bloom hasn\'t exceeded toxin limits set by the state, it is known to produce them. It appears as a mat-like material on the bottom of the lake and can float to the surface. It\'s also thickest in shallow coves.

Swimmers and boaters who come in contact with an algal bloom are urged to rinse off with tap water and, for pets, try to keep them from licking themselves. And if an illness arises, people should seek medical attention - or bring pets to a veterinarian.

You can monitor statewide water sampling stations on the S.C. Watershed Atlas.

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