Gutter Cleaning in
Mount Pleasant SC

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The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in Mount Pleasant, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in Mount Pleasant.

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Gutter Cleaning in Mount Pleasant, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

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Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

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Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

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Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

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Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in Mount Pleasant for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in Mount Pleasant, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

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Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

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Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

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Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

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Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in Mount Pleasant, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

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At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in Mount Pleasant, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in Mount Pleasant:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in Mount Pleasant. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
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Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in Mount Pleasant, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in Mount Pleasant, SC:

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Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
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Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
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Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
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Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
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Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
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Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in Mount Pleasant

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in Mount Pleasant. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

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Latest News in Mount Pleasant

Great white shark finds a home at Edisto 60 reef off SC coast

A great white shark is lurking in the waters at the Edisto 60 Reef. And while you might be able to hook the 11-foot giant, there’s no way you’ll be able to reel it in.The great white is a 2,800-pound replica of a shark constructed from concrete and steel that is welded to the deck of a 250-foot barge that was sunk at the reef located off the South Carolina coast on Sept. 14.The shark is one of many unique pieces affixed to the barge that soon will be attracting aquatic species for anglers and divers to enjoy. Much o...

A great white shark is lurking in the waters at the Edisto 60 Reef. And while you might be able to hook the 11-foot giant, there’s no way you’ll be able to reel it in.

The great white is a 2,800-pound replica of a shark constructed from concrete and steel that is welded to the deck of a 250-foot barge that was sunk at the reef located off the South Carolina coast on Sept. 14.

The shark is one of many unique pieces affixed to the barge that soon will be attracting aquatic species for anglers and divers to enjoy. Much of the water tower that once towered over the Old Village in Mount Pleasant also is part of the reef addition, along with container boxes donated by Coastal Conservation Association of South Carolina.

Robert Martore, who heads the artificial reef program for the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, said the shark has received a lot of positive feedback. The open spaces of the container boxes will provide habitat for grouper and snappers and other species will find safety around the other structure affixed to the barge, he said.

Martore said the shark had been under construction “for at least a year and a half” by employees who would come in and work on the giant during the COVID quarantine.

“Once they started developing it, they got pretty specific, looking up anatomical features and how they could make it anatomically correct,” Martore said of the great white sculpture. “Because it’s concrete, invertebrates will colonize it just like any other structures. It will be overgrown with corals and sponges and things like that and that’s what will attract the fish. There’s no interior space for them to live in. But you will get lots of invertebrates and juvenile life once it becomes colonized with those other marine organisms.”

Stevens Towing on Yonges Island, which does a lot of work with the reef program, had the barge – which had been used to transport reef material in the past – that was being retired. Mount Pleasant Waterworks offered the material from the old water tower. And CCA, which has worked with SCDNR on 15 other reef projects, provided the shipping containers. And since the shark was completed, well, Martore said they decided to add it to the barge to make it a little more interesting.

The old water tower had to be cut into sections for transport and no longer has the huge bowl look. All of those pieces and parts were welded into place to provide habitat for the fish.

South Carolina has 48 artificial reef sites, 45 of which are open to the public to fish and three of which are protected sites. There is the Deep Water Marine Protected Area in which the South Carolina Memorial Reef is located, where bottom fishing is prohibited but trolling for pelagics is allowed. And there are two other sites called Spawning Special Management Zones which began as research sites but now are federally protected and fishing is prohibited. They are listed on nautical charts as protected sites, Martore noted.

During the early days, South Carolina’s artificial reef program was conceived as a way to improve recreational fishing but also as “an effective means of disposing of materials which are unsightly litter when accumulated on land, according to a 1978 publication. Baled automobile tires, metal milk crates and junked steel appliances aren’t used today, but some of the materials used back then are still usable, such as old steel hulled boats and military equipment.

Martore said country singer Kenny Chesney’s No Shoes Reef Fund has donated reef ball molds and they now have eight molds that can be filled with concrete in order to form reef structures. And SCDNR employees work on their own designs, first making prototype molds from plywood. If the result is promising, they then will build steel molds that can be used over and over. But donations of larger pieces, such as the water tower, bridges that are being replaced or vessels such as the ones donated by CCA South Carolina are very much appreciated.

“People approach me and ask if this is something you’d be interested in, something you can use. Sometimes it is, sometimes it isn’t,” Martore said.

There are ICBMs (intercontinental ballistic missiles) filled with concrete on South Carolina reefs. There are missile cradles, some M60 battle tanks, howitzers and armored personnel carriers. The New York City Transit Authority donated nearly 250 subway cars. Companies have donated concrete culverts and concrete utility boxes that didn’t pass inspection for their intended use.

“Many years ago, a porcelain company sent down a shipment of toilet bowls. Porcelain is a nice hard structure that can be colonized, and it actually turned out pretty functional,” Martore said.

“The big thing is can it be used at a reasonable cost. For example, all those military vehicles needed a very thorough cleaning. Because they were vehicles, the engines had to be removed, the transmissions, the fuel tanks. That was something the military did themselves. The same thing with the subway cars. They did the cleanup and we got them completely free.

“It always comes down to cost benefit. Is it worth spending money on? Is someone else willing to do the work?”

The East Cooper and Sea Islands chapters of CCA South Carolina will hold their annual Celebrating Conservation Banquet and Auction at 6 p.m. Oct. 15 at Omar Shrine Auditorium in Mount Pleasant. Call Jay Brown at 843-224-0028; J.R. McCroskey at 843-906-2431; or the CCA State Office at 803-865-4164 or visit ccasouthcarolina.com.

#Whoyouwhit fishing tournament

The #Whoyouwhit Benefit fishing tournament, fished in honor of Whit Nelson, will be held Oct. 23 at The Marina at Edisto Beach. Proceeds will benefit The National Institute of Mental Health and Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing.

America’s Boating Club

America’s Boating Club Charleston will hold boating safety classes Nov. 6, Dec. 4 and Jan. 15 at 1376 Orange Grove Road, Charleston. Classes begin at 9 a.m. and end around 4 p.m. Successful participants earn the S.C. Department of Natural Resources Boater Education Card. The cost is $25 for adults and youth 12-18 are free. Call 843-312-2876 or email lynes@tds.net.

The East Cooper Outboard Motor Club will hold its annual turkey shoot Nov. 3-24 from 6:30-10 p.m. at Goldbug Island in Mount Pleasant. Last year the event donated $30,000 to Lowcountry charities and since the shoot began in 1997 it has raised $483,500 for charity.

Long Point Schoolhouse officially moves into Snowden community

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCIV) — Friday was a monumental day for the Snowden community.“We have an amazing, huge project probably bigger than anything else is going on in America,” said Josh Wright, President of the African American Historic Settlement Commission.The Long Point School has been a fixture in Mount Pleasant since 1872 on Long Point Road. It now has a new home in the Snowden community.“This is almost in the center of Snowden, you know, and this is the community that was served by this bu...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCIV) — Friday was a monumental day for the Snowden community.

“We have an amazing, huge project probably bigger than anything else is going on in America,” said Josh Wright, President of the African American Historic Settlement Commission.

The Long Point School has been a fixture in Mount Pleasant since 1872 on Long Point Road. It now has a new home in the Snowden community.

“This is almost in the center of Snowden, you know, and this is the community that was served by this building,” said Michael Allen, partner of the settlement association.

It was once a school for the African American community in Snowden for almost 50 years. Now the Long Point Schoolhouse will now be turned into a Cultural and Educational Center to reflect the history of the area.

“It's a recognition that this is an important site in the American experience, in the African American journey, and it needs to be protected, preserved and interpreted in this ground,” Allen said.

The Long Point Schoolhouse has a new purpose in a new location, but it still has the same memories for some of these community members.

“Just about everybody in this neighborhood has ties to the school. You know, their parents or grandparents,” Claudia Holmes Mazyck said.

The Holmes family has had generations grow up next to this building.

“We grew up in that house, we played in that house, our entire life,” Doris Holmes Brunson said.

In fact, Flora Small Holmes, the grandmother of this family, had the land of the Long Point Schoolhouse passed down to her.

Her grandson Michael said he made it into a home decades ago.

“I lived there for about 1981 to '86 out. Then after that, he just rented it out to family members and people in the area,” Michael Holmes said.

As the family and other community members watched the building move down the street Friday, the wheels started turning and the conversations started flowing.

“In the summertime, as kids when school was out, our grandmother would come take care of us,” Michael said.

John Wright is an army veteran who served two tours overseas but says. Today, he said, trumps all of that.

“This school is bigger than those two conflicts and anything I think I’ve ever done in my entire life. This is probably the biggest initiative on the biggest project that I’ve ever been involved with,” Wright said.

It’s a day that this community says will leave an impact for years to come.

“From this day forward, a pathway has been set, a course has been laid out, that we will protect, preserve and honor the legacy of those who are here,” Allen said.

Renovations on the school are said to take around a year. The center will hopefully be up and running by 2023.

Town of Mount Pleasant buys $6.5M property for unknown purposes

MOUNT PLEASANT — Town Council’s last meeting before the Nov. 2 election ended with arguments over a $6.5 million land purchase, accusations about political maneuvering and one councilman abruptly leaving.At issue is whether to cancel a previously approved contract to buy nearly 33 acres of land in the Carolina Park development between Faison Road and the Mount Pleasant Regional Airport.Mayor Will Haynie and two councilmen, Howard Chapman and Jake Rambo, unsuccessfully tried to scrap the deal, with Chapman saying the...

MOUNT PLEASANT — Town Council’s last meeting before the Nov. 2 election ended with arguments over a $6.5 million land purchase, accusations about political maneuvering and one councilman abruptly leaving.

At issue is whether to cancel a previously approved contract to buy nearly 33 acres of land in the Carolina Park development between Faison Road and the Mount Pleasant Regional Airport.

Mayor Will Haynie and two councilmen, Howard Chapman and Jake Rambo, unsuccessfully tried to scrap the deal, with Chapman saying the money could be spent on drainage improvements instead.

Apparently upset by the effort, Councilman Tom O’Rourke abruptly left what would be his last council meeting, as other members of council urged him to stay. O’Rourke, who is not seeking re-election, walked out immediately after Chapman made the motion to cancel the land deal.

“I am no longer a member of council and have nothing to say about anything,” he texted a Post and Courier reporter Oct. 13, declining to answer questions about the events of the meeting.

O’Rourke, the former long-time director of Charleston County Parks and Recreation, has been serving his first term on Town Council and remains a member of council until his seat is filled in the election.

Councilwoman Kathy Landing, who is running for mayor against Haynie, accused the incumbent of pulling a political stunt by trying to end the contract at the Oct. 12 council meeting.

“This is completely out of order,” Landing told Haynie at one point. “And I see that smile on your face, and it’s not appropriate.”

The events played out at the very end of the meeting. At the start of the meeting, several town residents had questioned the lack of transparency about the land purchase, which would consume most of the $7.5 million in American Rescue Plan Act funds the town expects from the federal government.

Haynie said it made sense to reconsider the deal because it was the last council meeting ahead of an Oct. 31 deadline when the town could still get back its deposit on the purchase.

“All we know is that we’re getting a $7.5 million windfall … and we’re going to spend $6.5 million on something we don’t have a plan for,” he said. “It puts the town in the real estate business.”

Town officials have said little about the purchase or what’s intended there, partly because there is no specific plan.

Some council members think the property could be home to a performing arts center some day, or a senior center for the north end of town, or recreation facilities, or some combination of those things.

“Certainly, we need to get this piece of property into the town,” said Councilman Gary Santos, who supports the deal and is up for re-election.

Supporters see the land as a opportunity to plan ahead because the fast-growing population in the north end of Mount Pleasant will need additional services, and the price of land in the town has been soaring.

“The problem is, we don’t know what’s going there,” said Chapman. “We haven’t developed a plan.”

He countered the town has developed and vetted a plan to improve drainage and flooding, and the money could be used for that purpose.

The town’s purchase involved 33 acres of a 106-acre tract and would take that portion off the property tax rolls. The undeveloped property is currently taxed as agricultural land, and the total property tax bills have amounted to less than $4,000 yearly, according to county records.

Mount Pleasant would get just under a third of that land for $6.5 million.

“This is at a deep discount to a very low appraisal value,” said Landing. “We’d be purchasing this at less than $200,000 an acre.”

The land is owned by Lerato LLC, which is controlled by Chris Marino, who could not be reached for comment Wednesday.

Brian Keels, chief operating officer of Carolina Park Development, said he isn’t familiar with the deal.

Opponents of the land purchase didn’t so much question the price as they did the purpose. Rambo described it as a public-private partnership, and he said those don’t work out well, citing Charleston County’s involvement in the failed Naval Hospital redevelopment in North Charleston.

Muddying the water a bit, an apparently unrelated plan to construct an entertainment venue in Carolina Park involving competitive video gaming — also along Faison Road — has been in the news in recent weeks.

Landing, who has been enthusiastic about the e-sports venue, suggested some people mistakenly thought the town’s land deal was a part of that.

Councilwoman Guang Ming Whitley has been talking with Marino for more than two years about the town acquiring land in Carolina Park as a home to a performing arts center, among other things. In 2020, Whitley and Marino co-wrote an opinion article for The Moultrie News calling for the town to use county Greenbelt funds for a land purchase there.

“I just think the potential here is so limitless for the town,” Whitley said at the Oct. 12 meeting.

Mount Pleasant doesn’t have a performing arts center, or any substantial amount of money set aside to build one, although it’s the fourth-largest city in the state.

In the end, the vote on the contract Oct. 12 was much like the original vote. Just three votes were cast against the contract, so the deal moves forward with many questions left to be answered.

Edisto reef addition features eclectic mix of structures, including Mount Pleasant water tank

What do a barge, a deconstructed water tower, shipping containers and a shark sculpture have in common? They’re all elements of a new addition to an artificial reef off the coast of Edisto Island.Although SCDNR biologists have been constructing artificial reefs for more than 40 years, this year marked a particularly large project with a new partner: Mount Pleasant Waterworks.The water utility donated the water tower from the Old Village area of Mount Pleasant. The tower, built in 1934, was dismantled on July 20. It hadn&r...

What do a barge, a deconstructed water tower, shipping containers and a shark sculpture have in common? They’re all elements of a new addition to an artificial reef off the coast of Edisto Island.

Although SCDNR biologists have been constructing artificial reefs for more than 40 years, this year marked a particularly large project with a new partner: Mount Pleasant Waterworks.

The water utility donated the water tower from the Old Village area of Mount Pleasant. The tower, built in 1934, was dismantled on July 20. It hadn’t held water since 1991 after it was replaced with ground storage tanks. There were community discussions as to whether to fix the tower or dismantle it. However, the structure required massive repairs with an estimate of about $1.2 million to make it safe so the decision was made to take it down.

“Repurposing our Old Village Water Tank as an artificial reef allows us the opportunity to fulfill our mission of protecting the environment,” said Mount Pleasant Waterworks General Manager Allan Clum. “We all have something at stake when it comes to water, and we’re grateful for our partnership with SCDNR as we work together to protect our natural resources.”

Clum said all the structures, including the water tank undergo a rigorous cleaning process to ensure they’re safe to sink as part of a reef.

Onlookers enjoyed low seas and an east wind on September 14 while watching the 250-foot retired barge sink beneath the waves to its new home on the seafloor. It took six hours for the barge to completely submerge.

Within half a year or so, marine life will begin to colonize the barge and fish will school in the area.

“The variety of structures will provide habitat for a diverse array of species,” said Robert Martore, longtime head of the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources’ (SCDNR) artificial reef program. “The open spaces of the container boxes provide a cave-like interior that larger species like snapper and grouper prefer, while the pieces of the water tower create low relief habitat that provide refuge for smaller species and juveniles.”

Artificial reefs play a similar role in the ocean as coral reefs. Manmade structures that are typically placed on areas of seafloor with little natural relief, artificial reefs improve habitat and spawning grounds for fish and marine life – in turn attracting recreational divers and anglers. The environmental benefits of artificial reefs are twofold, as they recycle materials that would otherwise be destined for landfills in addition to expanding critical habitat for offshore fish.

The reef addition also marked another successful project with the Coastal Conservation Association South Carolina, which has provided support for 15 reef projects to date. CCA SC and their longtime partner Sea Hunt Boat Company donated 12 container boxes that were placed on the barge and funded half the costs of the barge itself and towing to the reef site.

The barge was also decked out with a life-sized concrete sculpture of a white shark created by SCDNR biologists. In-house concrete structures are nothing new to the program, which has experimented with creating different shapes and sizes to benefit different fish species over the years.

“But this time, we decided to get creative and create a photo op that scuba divers would enjoy,” Martore said.

About 10 nautical miles offshore, the Edisto 60-foot reef (also known as PA-30) is already a well-developed artificial reef spot popular among anglers and divers. Over 20 structures have previously been submerged there, including a large ship, military vehicles, and rubble from the old Cooper River Bridge.

Happenings: A doctor-author visits SC; a James Bond history gains new relevance

Kimmery Martin, a resident of Charlotte, N.C., is an emergency medicine physician turned novelist whose book “Doctors and Friends” will be published by Berkley on Nov. 9.Martin will participate in a virtual talk and a live event, both sponsored by Buxton Books.The Nov. 3 event is a free virtual talk with Martin set for 4-5 p.m. Register at https://bit.ly/3mPcdIg.The Nov. 15 event is an in-store signing set for 5-6 p.m. For information, go to...

Kimmery Martin, a resident of Charlotte, N.C., is an emergency medicine physician turned novelist whose book “Doctors and Friends” will be published by Berkley on Nov. 9.

Martin will participate in a virtual talk and a live event, both sponsored by Buxton Books.

The Nov. 3 event is a free virtual talk with Martin set for 4-5 p.m. Register at https://bit.ly/3mPcdIg.

The Nov. 15 event is an in-store signing set for 5-6 p.m. For information, go to https://bit.ly/3ADG8Im.

“Doctors and Friends” was written before the COVID pandemic and is inspired by Martin’s interest in infectious diseases. In the novel, close friends from medical school find themselves on the front lines of a fast-spreading viral outbreak.

Originally conceived as a cautionary, this-could-really-happen tale that explored how the medical world would respond to a new strain of a lethal virus, the novel evolved to focus more on human stories.

Martin also will appear at a ticketed luncheon in Spartanburg on Nov. 10 at noon, sponsored by Hub City Bookshop, at the Piedmont Club downtown; at a ticketed luncheon in Greenville on Nov. 11 at noon, sponsored by M. Judson Booksellers, at Soby’s Restaurant; and at a ticketed luncheon on Pawley’s Island at 11 a.m., sponsored by Litchfield Books, at The Village House.

For more information about those events, go to https://www.kimmerymartin.com/appearances.

“Doctors and Friends” is available as a $27 hardcover.

Local author’s Bond history newly relevant

Mount-Pleasant-based scholar and author Walt Hanclosky, using the pen name William Mast, released “James Bond: Inspirations of a Legend” in late 2019. It presents an historical record of James Bond’s career, matching 24 actual events with 52 corresponding story episodes found in all 12 Bond novels, five short stories, one television script and four film screenplays released to the public before or shortly after Ian Fleming’s death.

The timeline starts in the 16th century with an individual known as 007 and ends with the first five of the Bond films.

Mast did post-doctoral research in new media at Columbia University and Parsons School of Design. His has worked for the Smithsonian Institute of American History, various government agencies and universities and assorted advocacy groups. He taught media arts at the University of South Carolina.

The book is available as a $16.95 paperback and a $9.99 ebook.

Adam Parker

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