Gutter Cleaning in
North Charleston SC

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The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in North Charleston, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in North Charleston.

Service Areas

Gutter Cleaning in North Charleston, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

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Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

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Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

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Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

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Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in North Charleston for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in North Charleston, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

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Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

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Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

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Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

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Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in North Charleston, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

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At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in North Charleston, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in North Charleston:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in North Charleston. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
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Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in North Charleston, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in North Charleston, SC:

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Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
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Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
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Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
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Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
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Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
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Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in North Charleston

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in North Charleston. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

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Latest News in North Charleston

Business establishes North Charleston plant to be near defense sector

Elbit Systems of America LLC, a subsidiary for Elbit Systems Ltd., plans to establish operations in Charleston County, creating an anticipated 300 jobs, the S.C. Department of Commerce sa...

Elbit Systems of America LLC, a subsidiary for Elbit Systems Ltd., plans to establish operations in Charleston County, creating an anticipated 300 jobs, the S.C. Department of Commerce said in a news release.

The Texas-based company provides high-performance products and system solutions that focus on the defense, homeland security, commercial aviation and medical instrumentation sectors.

Elbit Systems of America President and CEO Raanan Horowitz said the new facility builds on “decades of investment and growth in the U.S. defense market.”

“Establishing this facility is part of a strategy to increase Elbit’s engineering and manufacturing capabilities in the U.S. and contribute to strengthening America’s defense industrial base,” Horowitz said in a statement. “We selected South Carolina due to its strong support for economic development, the availability of skilled workforce, and the existence of a robust supply chain.”

The new facility will be located at 9028 Palmetto Commerce Parkway and will increase the company’s manufacturing capacity, in addition to supporting future growth of new products, according to the news release. The facility is expected to be completed by fall 2022.

“South Carolina continues to show itself as extremely competitive for companies looking to set up new operations," said Secretary of Commerce Harry M. Lightsey III. "Elbit Systems of America LLC’s decision to locate its new facility in South Carolina is another sign that our state’s business-friendly climate, skilled workforce and exceptional market access are working to attract investments that create new jobs within our borders.”

While headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas, Elbit has offices in Virginia, New Hampshire, Florida and Alabama.

The North Charleston facility will be the company’s first in South Carolina. Charleston Regional Development Alliance Board Chairman Mike Fuller said the decision was driven in large part by the success of the Port of Charleston as one of the most productive and efficient in the U.S.

“Charleston’s globally-connected infrastructure, robust defense sector, established automotive supply chain and reputation as a talent magnet influenced the company’s decision to locate here to better serve its customers," Fuller said. "Elbit Systems of America LLC will be a tremendous asset to our thriving defense, automotive and advanced manufacturing clusters.”

Airport leaders discuss temporary terminal, parking lots as part of needed expansion

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Leaders at the Charleston International Airport say they are looking at ways to expand the airport and its campus to better serve the region and a growing number of passengers passing through the airport. Officials say they are seeing passenger numbers topping those from a record year in 2019.Leaders are looking at several options from adding gates in the existing concourses to building a brand new concourse altogether. Some of the structures being considered may only be a temporary solution....

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Leaders at the Charleston International Airport say they are looking at ways to expand the airport and its campus to better serve the region and a growing number of passengers passing through the airport. Officials say they are seeing passenger numbers topping those from a record year in 2019.

Leaders are looking at several options from adding gates in the existing concourses to building a brand new concourse altogether. Some of the structures being considered may only be a temporary solution.

“But it’s easy exit, no problems at all,” says Sauravh Khurana a passenger who says he frequently travels through Charleston International. Khurana says the airport is among the best he travels through.

Passenger numbers at Charleston International have surpassed record numbers from 2019 at points this year during COVID-19 recovery. Officials at the airport say it’s a good problem but it has created a need for expansion.

“It’s elbow to elbow down there, I flew out on Monday to DCA and it was busy, there wasn’t a place to sit,” says Elliott Summey, Executive Director of Charleston International.

Plans for a new concourse have been discussed for years. Executive Director Elliott Summey says a growing Charleston region, whether that be passengers or new business, he says it puts a higher demand on growing the airport’s campus now rather than down the road.

“New construction you’re talking a five-to-six-year period well the business is here now,” says Director Summey.

A rooftop bar and holding rooms, expanded parking facilities, adding new gates to existing concourses, new restaurants and more are just some of options being considered.

“Virtual technology, temporary gates, temporary parking facilities – we’re looking at the whole campus holistically,” says Director Summey.

The biggest change being considered, building a temporary concourse to welcome more direct flights for growing business while making sure to increase passenger capacity.

“They have these modular buildings which with today’s technology are very beautiful, tall ceilings and you can put concessions in there,” says Director Summey. “To some extent you can even have your own TSA in there and baggage.”

Passengers say the current airport is a good footprint to add too while bringing more amenities for the passengers passing through.

“I think have more restaurants and more facilities available,” says Khurana.

Director Summey says they’ve brought in consultants to see what can be done on the campus. If officials decide to move forward with a temporary concourse structure, it would talk about 12 to 18 months to complete construction.

Charleston County SOA to potentially redesign costume and fashion design major

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Creativity - it's what these students live for. But, a turn on the catwalk may be coming.The Charleston County School of the Arts costume and fashion design major may be redesigned."We didn’t really know what was happening until we got an email that they wanted to turn the fashion major into overall design," said Beatrice Criscuolo, an 11th grade student at the School of the Arts.The classes max out at 12. Over the last five years, there hasn't been consistency when i...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Creativity - it's what these students live for. But, a turn on the catwalk may be coming.

The Charleston County School of the Arts costume and fashion design major may be redesigned.

"We didn’t really know what was happening until we got an email that they wanted to turn the fashion major into overall design," said Beatrice Criscuolo, an 11th grade student at the School of the Arts.

The classes max out at 12. Over the last five years, there hasn't been consistency when it comes to a full class.

"One of the challenges we have had is that that major has continued to have lower numbers, so in order to sustain that major and move forward we are looking at ways we can broaden it and strengthen it and still keep fashion as part of that design major," said Dr. Shannon Cook. She's the principal over at the School of the Arts.

When the maximum amount of students isn't hit it means another class somewhere else in the school has to make up the difference by packing in more students to a class, like math or science.

For reference, allocations from the Charleston County School District for teachers are based on a ratio of 21 students to a teacher.

Dr. Cook is now looking into ways to broaden the major to be more inclusive so more students apply.

Although the potential change would not impact current students, it still has some students nervous.

"We are also worried about space – there really is almost no space," said Ellison Holland, a junior at SOA. "The freshman class this year has more students than it has in the last four years and the room is so overcrowded that we physically don’t have the space for 20 students."

Dr. Cook says she's gotten advice from a top art school.

"We reached out to SCAD, Savannah College of Art and Design, and said if you were receiving our students into your design programs, what kind of high school experience would you want them to have? The dean of the school said we would want them to have a stronger design base so that they know the options and the opportunities out there," said Dr. Cook.

Still, some students are pleading for one thing,

"I would probably ask them to reconsider changing the major and maybe take a look at it for what it is," said Lilian Thomas, an 11th grade student at SOA.

The change is not set in stone yet.

The School of the Arts still has to present a proposal to the school district.

Dr. Cook says she plans on doing that by the end of the year.

North Charleston neighborhood wants land returned to community for affordable housing

NORTH CHARLESTON — Union Heights was among several African American communities negatively impacted by the construction of Interstate 26.Now, decades after the highway sliced through Union Heights, residents say there’s an opportunity to right that past wrong.Land that was once part of the interstate will be transferred to the city of North Charleston, likely sometime next year. When that happens, Union Heights representatives want the city to then give the property to the neighborhood so the community, in collabora...

NORTH CHARLESTON — Union Heights was among several African American communities negatively impacted by the construction of Interstate 26.

Now, decades after the highway sliced through Union Heights, residents say there’s an opportunity to right that past wrong.

Land that was once part of the interstate will be transferred to the city of North Charleston, likely sometime next year. When that happens, Union Heights representatives want the city to then give the property to the neighborhood so the community, in collaboration with a local land trust and housing nonprofit, can build affordable single-family homes in an area that’s become increasingly threatened by gentrification.

“We want to create affordable housing so that families can create generational wealth,” said Skip Mikell, president of the Union Heights Neighborhood Council.

Two streets in Union Heights were removed through eminent domain when I-26 was built in 1960, Mikell said. At the time, the predominantly Black neighborhood was about 70 percent owner-occupied. Today, less than half of those living in the neighborhood own their homes.

“Now, there’s a chance to make that right and put (the property) back into the community,” Mikell said.

The property, a stretch between Joppa and Irving avenues, formerly served as the Spruill Avenue Exit 218 for I-26. The exit was removed during construction of the Port Access Road that leads to the new Leatherman Terminal.

The land likely won’t be transferred to the city of North Charleston until the second quarter of 2022, state Department of Transportation spokesman Pete Poore said.

Residents said this is one of the last chances they see at preserving affordability in the residential community, since from the south, pressure is being applied as the city of Charleston redevelops the last of its territory in the Neck Area. From the north, pressure is increasing as the Park Circle area, now a haven for the professional class, stretches westward and southward.

White homeowners have moved into Union Heights since a developer constructed several single-family homes that range in price from the low-$170,000s to high-$190,000s.

The neighborhood says it can help address the housing need. That’s why Mikell sent a letter to city officials requesting the Exit 218 land be transferred to the neighborhood council. The council would then work with the Community First Land Trust and Habitat for Humanity to build affordable houses.

The land trust has already completed one house and will finish a second home in about six weeks, Mikell said.

The land trust’s approach allows families to build generational wealth, Mikell said.

“We’ll put people in four-bedroom homes for $160,000,” Mikell said. “The reason [the land trust] can do that is because we don’t have to pay $30,000-$40,000 for a lot. The community owns the lot. The family leases the lot from the land trust, but they own their home. We want to see them pass the value of the home from one generation to the next generation.”

City spokesman Tony Tassarotti said the mayor and City Council are working on a plan for the Union Heights property, though Tassarotti didn’t address the neighborhood’s specific request to have the property transferred to the community.

Mayor Keith Summey has previously spoken about his desire to see affordable housing on the property. He said the site could be an ideal spot for senior housing. The mayor has also said he wants to see Union Heights, a neighborhood split by highway infrastructure, reconnected.

Summey previously said he intended to get input from the community.

Union Heights isn’t the only neighborhood in the area to have witnessed displacement.

Farther north, North Charleston’s Russelldale, Ferndale, Liberty Park and Highland Terrace neighborhoods will be impacted by the state’s billion-dollar plan to widen Interstate 526. Those same neighborhoods were disrupted by the construction of I-26 years ago.

Editorial: Park Circle reinvestment a wise move for North Charleston

What we know today as North Charleston began taking shape decades before the city was incorporated in 1972, and two of its oldest civic buildings are long overdue for major renovations. We urge City Council to proceed apace and strive for excellence with its $45 million plan to make the necessary upgrades to those structures and undertake other recreational improvements inside Park Circle, one of the city’s premier public spaces.The city’s plan would use money from a tax increment financing district, which was created year...

What we know today as North Charleston began taking shape decades before the city was incorporated in 1972, and two of its oldest civic buildings are long overdue for major renovations. We urge City Council to proceed apace and strive for excellence with its $45 million plan to make the necessary upgrades to those structures and undertake other recreational improvements inside Park Circle, one of the city’s premier public spaces.

The city’s plan would use money from a tax increment financing district, which was created years ago around the Park Circle area. Such districts divert increased property tax collections that result from new building within an area into a special fund for several years; local governments then can borrow against that revenue stream to make public improvements within that area.

Those improvements can be new parks, sidewalk and road improvements, new lighting and landscaping, or as in North Charleston’s current case, improved city buildings.

We understand why some City Council members questioned whether the proposed improvements are really the city’s top priority, but the city is limited by the nature of the tax district as far as where it can spend the money. The money such districts generate remains within the district lines, even if there is a more urgent need somewhere else. The city of Charleston used a different approach with the municipal tax district it recently created on Johns Island, where the owners in new development will pay more for a few decades to help offset greater infrastructure needs on the island.

In any case, we see a clear need in and around Park Circle, which has benefited from new investment, new businesses and new residents but still can use the city’s help to keep its momentum going. As reporter Rickey Ciapha Dennis Jr. noted, the Felix C. Davis Community Center was constructed in 1943 (and revamped after Hurricane Hugo); it was built and operated until two years ago by the Cooper River Parks and Playground Commission, which provided recreational services before the city was formed.

The city plans to double the size of the space so it can host indoor and for outdoor events; it’s an opportunity to create an impressive building worthy of one of North Charleston’s oldest and most impressive public spaces, the circular park inside Park Circle. “Now that we own the building, it’s time we take it to another level,” Mayor Keith Summey told Mr. Dennis.

Likewise, the Danny Jones Recreation Center, about five blocks to the west, also was built before the city formed, and its pool, gym, track and courts also could use a refresh. The main building isn’t useful anymore, partly because it contains no room for spectators (unlike the city’s impressive new aquatics center near Fort Dorchester High School).

Meanwhile, the city’s Miracle League Field, also inside Park Circle, would be its largest playground at about 24,000 square feet and would be designed especially to welcome children with varying physical, emotional or mental abilities. It’s a worthy project that would give all kids an opportunity to participate in activities.

North Charleston grew into the state’s third-largest city without establishing a downtown, but the Park Circle are is closest to being that traditional civic core. The city’s proposed major reinvestment in the East Montague Avenue area is a strategic step toward making this area even more desirable by recognizing that some of North Charleston’s public buildings and spaces are out of date and need a major refresh. It could make for a great 50th birthday present.

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