Gutter Cleaning in
Seabrook Island SC

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The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in Seabrook Island, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in Seabrook Island.

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Gutter Cleaning in Seabrook Island, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

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Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

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Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

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Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

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Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in Seabrook Island for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in Seabrook Island, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

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Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

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Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

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Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

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Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in Seabrook Island, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

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At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in Seabrook Island, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in Seabrook Island:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in Seabrook Island. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
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Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in Seabrook Island, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in Seabrook Island, SC:

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Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
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Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
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Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
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Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
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Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
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Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in Seabrook Island

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in Seabrook Island. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

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Latest News in Seabrook Island

Earthquakes: A whole lot of shaking is going on in nearby Summerville

South Carolina experiences about 10 earthquakes each year. They usually register between less than 1 and up to 4.1 on the Richter Scale. With two dozen seismometers buried underground throughout the state, every tremor and quake are recorded. On Monday, September 27, at 12:49 p.m., USGS data reportedly detected a 2.9 magnitude earthquake located 5.6 miles north-northwest of Ridgeville in Dorchester County. In a video announcement, Dr. Steven Jaume, professor and geologist at the College of Charleston, reported that there was a second quake ...

South Carolina experiences about 10 earthquakes each year. They usually register between less than 1 and up to 4.1 on the Richter Scale. With two dozen seismometers buried underground throughout the state, every tremor and quake are recorded. On Monday, September 27, at 12:49 p.m., USGS data reportedly detected a 2.9 magnitude earthquake located 5.6 miles north-northwest of Ridgeville in Dorchester County. In a video announcement, Dr. Steven Jaume, professor and geologist at the College of Charleston, reported that there was a second quake minutes after the first one. He said that quake was a 2.0 magnitude aftershock. Nearly five hours later on that same day, at about 6:21 p.m., a third earthquake hit Dorchester County, this time in Summerville. This quake had a recorded magnitude 3.3 and occurred in the Wescott Golf Club off of Dorchester Road in Summerville. Residents throughout the Lowcountry, including portions of Berkeley County, reportedly felt the earthquake and hundreds of calls came in to local radio and television stations asking about it. No one has claimed any damage so far. No earthquakes were reported that day in Colleton County, but Colleton does sit on a fault line. Regardless, earthquakes are nothing new to this area. In 1886, Charleston experienced the worst earthquake in the entire eastern United States. Because of that incident, studies by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) found that South Carolina sits on a fault line, particularly near Charleston and specifically along the neighboring city of Summerville. That means that surrounding counties are susceptible to quakes. According to geologists, the crust of the earth is like a factory. Old crust is constantly melted and new crust is being made, and the continents are always floating on a river of melted rock. This movement causes problems…namely earthquakes. Earthquakes occur when rocks under the earth’s surface are being squeezed together until they pop up or collapse down, or are pulled apart causing a break. They may also be shifted and slide or grind from side to side. Then the rocks break. It can sound like an explosion or sonic boom. The shifting rock may not be very powerful under the surface, but as everything above it shifts too, it grows in velocity and noise. The break in the rock can then be felt and heard. Rocks break and when the rocks move past each near the earth’s surface, it is called a faulting: coastal South Carolina sits on a fault line. Another one runs across the northern most part of Colleton County. Unfortunately, much of the Lowcountry sits on sandy soil which acts like a liquid during a quake, pushing buried cables and pipes above ground.

It’s going to happen again While scientists still can’t predict earthquakes, they do know one thing…if an earthquake happened once in a certain area, it will happen again. And if a quake of magnitude 6 or higher destroyed Charleston and surrounding counties once, another one will definitely occur again. According to Jaume, 70 percent of South Carolina earthquakes are located around Ravenel-Adams Run-Hollywood; at Middleton Place-Summerville; and in Bowman. The August 31, 1886 earthquake of Charleston occurred at 9:51 p.m., registered 7.6 on the Richtor Scale, was felt from N.Y. to Cuba, lasted 35 seconds, killed 110 people, caused $23 million in damage (or $158.48 million present day), damaged 14,000 houses and destroyed 90 percent of all brick structures. The two epicenters were located 21 miles northwest of Charleston and in Ravenel, say historians and geologists from USGS. While more recent earthquakes in the Lowcountry have not been as devastating as the 1886 quake, they have been felt and some have caused minor damage. According to Dr. Joyce Bagwell, affectionately known as the “Earthquake Lady,” another major quake is imminent for this area. “We are past due for another major quake. As time goes by, the probability of the Lowcountry experiencing a major earthquake grows,” said Bagwell in a 1993 conference. Bagwell headed the Earthquake Preparedness Department at Charleston Southern University and monitored seismic activity in South Carolina for the United States Geological Survey for more than 20 years until her death in March 2021.

In all, there have been 18 recorded and large earthquakes in or near Charleston since 1903, all of which caused damage. Just in August of this year, there have been six recorded earthquakes Across South Carolina, with four additional earthquakes recorded in September. Three of those four were in Summerville last week.

Recorded earthquakes On January 23, 1903, houses were shaken violently in South Carolina/Georgia border near Savannah. On April 19, 1907, a quake affected Charleston and went across a 26,000 square kilometer area. On June 12, 1912, a stronger earthquake caused damage to chimneys in Summerville, impacting an area of about 90,000 square kilometers. On January 1, 1913, the Union County area was shaken with cracks in many brick buildings and chimneys damaged. On September 22, 1914, an earthquake hit the Summerville area, with reports of walls being displaced in local buildings. On October 20, 1924, Pickens County was the epicenter of an earthquake that shook most of South Carolina and western North Carolina, northeastern Georgia, and eastern Tennessee. On July 26, 1945, an earthquake centered in Lake Murray, west of Columbia, and was felt in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee. No damage was noted. On November 19, 1952, moderately strong shocks occurred near Charleston. On October 20, 1958, moderate earthquakes awakened residents in Anderson and caused cracked and fallen plaster in walls. On August 3, 1959, a quake caused minor damage in Charleston, Summerville, and Wadmalaw Island. Chimneys were damaged and walls cracked in homes. On March 12, 1960, the earthquake epicenter was off the coast of South Carolina, impacting Augusta. On April 20, 1964, a strong quake was felt in Florence, Lexington, and Richland Counties. On May 19, 1971, several windows were broken in Bowman and Orangeburg from a magnitude 3.4 earthquake. On July 13, 1971, two small shocks, about 3 hours apart, were felt in western South Carolina. On November 11, 2002, areas near Seabrook Island, South Carolina experienced a magnitude 4.4 earthquake. There were no reports of damage or injuries. On December 16, 2008, a 3.6 magnitude earthquake occurred in Dorchester County. On Friday, February 14, 2014, an earthquake occurred in the midlands of SC. It was reported to have been a 4.1 earthquake.

Bouts of heavy rainfall to douse Lowcountry through Sept. 22, could lead to flash flooding

Torrents of heavy rain and tidal flooding are expected to hit the Lowcountry this week, potentially bringing nuisance flash flooding to low-lying areas.The National Weather Service’s Charleston office issued a coastal flood advisory for Charleston and Colleton counties through the evening of Sept. 21 as widespread showers crawled over much of the state’s southern tip on Sept. 20. The weather service also issued a flash flood watch through the morning of Sept. 21.Just over 2.5 inches of rain had fallen in West Ashley...

Torrents of heavy rain and tidal flooding are expected to hit the Lowcountry this week, potentially bringing nuisance flash flooding to low-lying areas.

The National Weather Service’s Charleston office issued a coastal flood advisory for Charleston and Colleton counties through the evening of Sept. 21 as widespread showers crawled over much of the state’s southern tip on Sept. 20. The weather service also issued a flash flood watch through the morning of Sept. 21.

Just over 2.5 inches of rain had fallen in West Ashley by 6 p.m., and about 2.8 inches had fallen in Mount Pleasant, according to the weather service. Summerville also received about 2.8 inches in rain. About 1.5 inches hit North Charleston and downtown Charleston received less than an inch.

The Lowcountry was expected to see 2 to 4 inches of rain on Sept. 21, with some areas seeing higher amounts, according to the weather service. The combination of elevated high tides and the ongoing showers would create minor flooding, mainly in urban and coastal areas.

Blair Holloway, a weather service meteorologist, said heavy rain had been forecast to hit the tri-county area through the afternoon of Sept. 22. After that, the Lowcountry is forecast to have a dry latter half of the week, he said.

“Given how wet Charleston’s been today, we will continue to see the potential for flooding until Wednesday,” he said. “Minor flooding looks very likely. We could have significant flash flooding depending on how the rain hits.”

In downtown Charleston, a potential overlap of heavy rain with some coastal flooding could result in an enhanced flooding risk. Coastal areas, such as Kiawah and Seabrook islands, were expected to experience flooding, according to the weather service.

The heavy rain is a result of a wet weather pattern, which developed early Sept. 20 off the coasts of Beaufort, Colleton and Charleston counties, according to the weather service.

Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Peter was forecast to bring heavy rain toward much of the Caribbean, including the Bahamas, U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

As of 5 p.m., the storm was around 150 miles northeast of the northern Leeward Islands, moving west-northwest at 14 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm recorded wind speeds of 50 mph.

There were no coastal watches or warnings in effect Sept. 20, but the system was forecast to continue moving west-northwest throughout the next couple of days. None of the U.S. mainland was in Peter’s path, according to the hurricane center’s most recent update.

Santee Cooper to run transmission lines across miles of marshland, Johns Island neighbors worried about wildlife

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Johns Island residents are concerned about proposed transmission lines that Santee Cooper plans to run through nearby marshland.Just across the marsh near the Simmons Creek subdivision is where the utility company is expected to install the power poles.“I honestly have never seen so many birds and wildlife, even dolphins, cutting through here,” said Rodger Willis who lives on Johns Island. “I’ve been very lucky to be out there.”But he is worried about how 5....

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Johns Island residents are concerned about proposed transmission lines that Santee Cooper plans to run through nearby marshland.

Just across the marsh near the Simmons Creek subdivision is where the utility company is expected to install the power poles.

“I honestly have never seen so many birds and wildlife, even dolphins, cutting through here,” said Rodger Willis who lives on Johns Island. “I’ve been very lucky to be out there.”

But he is worried about how 5.17 miles of transmission lines to supply power to Kiawah and Seabrook Island built through the marsh will impact him and the wildlife.

“Santee Cooper is proposing a powerline back up to the existing infrastructure, and right now, the proposed path comes right through the marsh here. They’re putting an 85-foot steel pole right off this island and cut through the tree line,” he said.

To give you a rough idea of the height, a pine tree that stands near the proposed site is around 40-feet. The utility pole would be around twice that high.

Several people in other neighborhoods are also concerned. The lines would run from a location near Rushland Landing Road all the way to near Dogpatch Lane.

Willis said he understands the route has changed during the process.

“There was a better route that was shorter that goes along existing poles, that was an option; but they bounced over to running it along the marsh for close to six miles,” he said. “It seems like an unnecessary waste of gorgeous marshland and has a negative effect.”

He went on to say, “We’re trying to work with them. We said we would like them to bury it. there’s some talk about the increase cost for that. We think it’s well worth it.”

State Senator Sandy Senn has been working with residents on this issue. Senn said she was told the cost estimate to bury the lines is close to $30 million.

On May 7th of this year, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control wrote a letter to say a permit had been issued for the project.

The letter says it will be their final decision unless a written request for final review, plus a $100 fee, is received by the department within 15 days.

3rd runway, 2 new hangars and aircraft plant in the works for Johns Island airport

A possible third runway, two proposed new hangars and a planned spy drone manufacturing plant have Charleston Executive Airport on Johns Island suddenly humming with renewed development interest.The Charleston County Aviation Authority, which owns the 1,333-acre airfield known by its call letters JZI, wants to buy about 137 acres on the north side of the airport for possible future runway expansion to allow for larger aircraft and to prevent a proposed housing development from being built in nearby airspace. Several new...

A possible third runway, two proposed new hangars and a planned spy drone manufacturing plant have Charleston Executive Airport on Johns Island suddenly humming with renewed development interest.

The Charleston County Aviation Authority, which owns the 1,333-acre airfield known by its call letters JZI, wants to buy about 137 acres on the north side of the airport for possible future runway expansion to allow for larger aircraft and to prevent a proposed housing development from being built in nearby airspace.

The property sale has not closed, and the Aviation Authority is now reviewing the undeveloped tract that abuts a bend in the Stono River.

A developer had proposed dividing the property, called Oakville Plantation off Burden Creek and River roads, into 242 lots for a development to be called River Run.

“This is a wonderful opportunity not only to protect the airport, but also to reduce the amount of homes that could potentially be constructed in the clear zone,” said Elliott Summey, CEO of the Aviation Authority.

He also said that fewer residences near the airport also will reduce traffic on River Road on the rapidly developing island.

Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg, an airport board member, said in a letter to Summey he is not opposed to the agency buying the land.

“The city of Charleston fully supports this acquisition for public safety purposes long-term to create a safe undeveloped perimeter around the airport and its runways,” Tecklenburg said.

The purchase price of the property will not be disclosed until the deal is finalized, according to airport attorney Arnold Goodstein. Much of the land is owned by Dr. Keith W. Lackey of Johns Island, according to Charleston County land records. He did not respond to a request for comment.

The land purchase would allow the Aviation Authority to consider revamping a taxiway that runs north-south through the center of Charleston Executive by returning it to its original use as a runway when the military built the airfield at the end of World War II, Summey said.

That would require widening it and extending it on the north side where the tract is located since the south side is hemmed in by the river.

“That place is getting busier and busier and a lot of larger jets are coming in there,” Goodstein said. “The purchase could allow us to extend that runway.”

The airfield has two runways: one is 5,350 feet long and is laid out east-west while the other is about 1,000 feet shorter and runs next to the Stono River.

The length of the new runway would be between 6,700 and 7,000 feet if built, Summey said.

Development of the new landing strip is at least four years away, he said.

Also, in the works at the Johns Island airfield are proposals for two new privately owned hangars.

JZI Hangars LLC wants to build an 8,000-square-foot airplane storage building at the airport. The firm is registered to Johns Island resident Adam Baslow of New Leaf Builders.

Also planning to build a 5,370-square-foot hangar is UEC Aviation LLC, registered to Philip J. Ufkes of Sullivan’s Island. Ufkes and his wife, Rebecca Ufkes, once owned defense contractor UEC Electronics in Hanahan before selling it in 2014 to Michigan-based Arotech.

Representatives of the two projects did not respond for comment on further details.

The move to build new hangars comes after Barzan Aeronautical presented plans to the city of Charleston in April for a new light industrial development code-named “Project Rose.”

The Qatari defense firm proposes to build three structures and a 200-space parking area on about 10 acres near an abandoned taxiway beside the airfield.

Site plans show a 54,000-square-foot aircraft manufacturing plant, an 18,400-square-foot office building and another structure near the parking area with offices, conference room and classroom.

Barzan, which has an office in Charleston, is expected to break ground in October, Summey said.

Airport officials also recently completed improvements in lighting at the Johns Island airport.

The increased interest in the airfield is a sign of an improving economy and wealthier newcomers to the region, Summey said.

“JZI, of all of our airports, is the most well-positioned for economic development,” he said. “It’s the most strategically placed real estate we have for high-tech aeronautical development.”

Summey said island residents want good-paying jobs so they can work where they live rather than commute elsewhere.

“If you look at Johns Island, the airport is the potential center of high-tech, clean-energy economic development,” he said.

Lowcountry fire departments net nearly $1M from FEMA for equipment, training

U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn says nearly $1 million worth of federal funding will go to Lowcountry fire departments in diverse locations from Elloree to Charleston.Seven fire departments received funding through the Department of Homeland Security’s Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program, the lawmaker announced in August. The money will be used to give Lowcountry firefighters updated tools and new training programs to better battle flames.“I am pleased to see these funds going to the hardworking firefighters throughout m...

U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn says nearly $1 million worth of federal funding will go to Lowcountry fire departments in diverse locations from Elloree to Charleston.

Seven fire departments received funding through the Department of Homeland Security’s Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program, the lawmaker announced in August. The money will be used to give Lowcountry firefighters updated tools and new training programs to better battle flames.

“I am pleased to see these funds going to the hardworking firefighters throughout my district who help protect and keep us safe,” Clyburn, D-S.C., said in a statement.

The Assistance to Firefighters Grant program awards money directly to fire departments and EMS organizations that are unaffiliated with a hospital. It helps them “enhance their response capabilities and effectively protect the health and safety of the public and emergency response personnel,” a media release said.

The majority of the grant money, more than $560,000, went to Charleston County Operations and Safety, according to the FEMA release.

All that money will go directly to the St. Johns Fire District on Johns Island, which was created by the state Legislature in April 1959.

The district is comprised of four barrier islands — Johns, Kiawah, Seabrook and Wadmalaw — covering a land mass of approximately 185 square miles.

Ryan Kunitzer, the fire marshal for St. John’s, said the much-needed funds will be used to give his team additional medical training.

“We are going to use this money to train 20 of our personnel to become EMTs and paramedics,” Kunitzer said. “It enables us to provide a larger number of services to our constituents. We’ll be able to provide a higher level medical service more rapidly.”

The money is crucial as Johns Island and the surrounding areas experience record levels of housing development and population growth.

Smaller amounts went to more rural fire departments, such as Whitesville Rural Volunteer Fire Department in Berkeley County. With the $73,000 the department received, the crew will be able to purchase around 25 more full sets of fire protection gear.

“This is fantastic news,” said Colt Roy, a spokesman for the Whitesville Rural Volunteer Fire Department. “One of our biggest challenges has been being able to outfit our new fireman. Now we can do that.”

Lebanon Fire Department Of Berkeley County in Ridgeville received $75,000 in federal money. Department Chief Nicky Sweatman said his team was in dire need of new radios, and that the grant was a godsend.

“We were using hand-me-down radios from the Berkeley County Sheriff’s,” Sweatman said. “We were in need of some new ones.”

The grant requires some of the departments to put up a small amount in matching funds, around five to 10 percent, as a requirement.

Clyburn said he was happy to see the money go to so many South Carolina fire stations.

“These funds will ensure that each fire department has the necessary tools to effectively respond to fire emergencies and will enable them to ensure the safety of their firefighters as well as those in the community they serve,” Clyburn said in a statement.

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