Gutter Cleaning in
Sullivan's Island SC

Ask Us Anything!

843 606 0798

Quick Quote

The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in Sullivan's Island, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in Sullivan's Island.

Service Areas

Gutter Cleaning in Sullivan's Island, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

foundation-damage.jpg

Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

Wood-Damage.jpg

Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

Landscaping-Damage

Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

Gutter-Damage.jpg

Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in Sullivan's Island for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in Sullivan's Island, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

Sagging-Gutters-1

Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

Birds-and-Pests-2.png

Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

Stains-on-Your-Siding-1

Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

Plant-Life-1

Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in Sullivan's Island, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

Gutter-Installation-sc

At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in Sullivan's Island, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in Sullivan's Island:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in Sullivan's Island. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
Gutter-Installation-sc

Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in Sullivan's Island, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in Sullivan's Island, SC:

icon-Pooling-Water
Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
icon-Leaks
Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
icon-Displaced-Hardware
Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
mold
Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
iconPeeling-Paint
Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
Uneven-Gutters
Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in Sullivan's Island

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in Sullivan's Island. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

Contact Us

Latest News in Sullivan's Island

Editorial: Sullivan’s Council was elected to save maritime forest. It’s time to act.

In a single generation, a vast forest has grown atop accreted sand along the southern shores of Sullivan’s Island, creating a natural wonder with its own nature trails, wildlife and unexpected vistas that give residents and visitors an excellent sense of the Lowcountry landscape that existed long before man first stepped foot here.The maritime forest also has been a source of controversy from its earliest days, pitting a majority of those who cherish this gift from nature and natural storm barrier against a vocal minority of aff...

In a single generation, a vast forest has grown atop accreted sand along the southern shores of Sullivan’s Island, creating a natural wonder with its own nature trails, wildlife and unexpected vistas that give residents and visitors an excellent sense of the Lowcountry landscape that existed long before man first stepped foot here.

The maritime forest also has been a source of controversy from its earliest days, pitting a majority of those who cherish this gift from nature and natural storm barrier against a vocal minority of affluent and influential property owners who understandably don’t like aspects of it, particularly how the growing trees block their views of the Atlantic Ocean.

For decades, the town managed this friction as local governments should — with a series of compromises that delighted neither side but allowed some pruning and adjustments here and there to mollify the residents abutting the forest. Then came last year, when a slim majority on Town Council, possibly emboldened by the distraction of a pandemic, approved a far more expansive plan to cut back the forest, on a series of 4-3 votes. This brazen action led a solid majority of town voters to elect a new council against that deal and supportive of the forest.

As we noted after that election, the voters sent a clear and powerful message to conserve the growing maritime forest, and we urged town officials to act. It’s disappointing, if understandable, that they have been so slow to act. One reason for the delay is that the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control is still determining what permits, if any, it will require before any cutting begins. Town Council has hesitated, too, because its October 2020 vote authorized a legal settlement that was approved by court order. So, legally speaking, it’s complicated.

But it’s time for forest supporters to act as boldly and decisively as opponents did to challenge the deal — before the first chainsaw is fired up.

We were encouraged last week when Town Council agreed to hire an outside attorney to review its rights under the settlement agreement. While forest opponents claim the agreement is set in stone, we doubt that. Although entering into a legally binding contract is different from simply approving an ordinance, there’s still a significant legal principle — embraced last month by the S.C. Supreme Court in the lawsuit challenging the Heritage Act — that says one legislative body can’t bind its successors. Town Council should at least explore whether the contract’s language does actually bind it, and, if so, what its legal options are for voiding or amending the contract.

Time is of the essence. One legal avenue would require action within a year of the court order, first signed Oct. 15, 2020, but amended in April; one of the many legal questions that needs clarification is whether Oct. 15 is the deadline or whether the town has until April to appeal. But there may be a more pressing deadline. Depending on what DHEC requires for a permit, opponents may try to begin the cutting as early as next month.

Ross Appel, a lawyer and Charleston City Council member hired by the maritime forest’s supporters, correctly notes that a court ultimately will decide, but Town Council at least needs to ask.

Contrary to what some claim, the town never promised it would manage the growing forest in a way that maintains beachfront residents’ ocean views; the original deed restriction for the forest does allow for some cutting, including cutting to create views, if Town Council so chooses.

And that is ultimately what Town Council must do now: make a choice. We urge it in the strongest possible terms to choose actions that challenge the settlement agreement and shed more light on how future councils may amend it. It’s time to act on the message town voters sent in May.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Town Residents Call For Action On Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest

By Karen Byko for Island Eye NewsIt has been almost four months since a new Sullivan’s Island Town Council and Mayor were voted in by a landslide with a clear mandate to do everything in their power to mitigate the destruction to the maritime forest. However, since taking office, Town Council has taken no action, despite the ability to ask for judicial review to see whether a settlement agreement passed by the last Town Council complies with South Carolina Law. That settlement agreement allows for unprecedented cutting of the ma...

By Karen Byko for Island Eye News

It has been almost four months since a new Sullivan’s Island Town Council and Mayor were voted in by a landslide with a clear mandate to do everything in their power to mitigate the destruction to the maritime forest. However, since taking office, Town Council has taken no action, despite the ability to ask for judicial review to see whether a settlement agreement passed by the last Town Council complies with South Carolina Law. That settlement agreement allows for unprecedented cutting of the maritime forest.

CALL TO ACTION: We urge every citizen who wants to save the forest to attend the Tuesday, September 21st Town Council meeting at 6pm: 2056 Middle Street, Sullivan’s’ Island, SC 29482 (Masks required).

LEGAL OPINION SHEDS LIGHT ON PATH FORWARD

“We believe inaction is unacceptable on an issue of this magnitude that impacts the safety and ecological health of our island,” said Sullivan’s Island for All President Karen Byko. “We must let these councilmembers know that despite past warnings from those who wrote the settlement that it is ‘unchallengeable,’ there actually is a path forward and we found there is legal precedent to do so.”

The public deserves to know:

To get these answers, Land-Use and Environmental Lawyer Ross Appel researched the issue and provided a thoroughly documented legal opinion to Sullivan’s Island for All that Town Council has two clear legal mechanisms available to challenge the settlement and the court order approving the settlement.

Based on legal precedents, it is Mr. Appel’s opinion, that nothing in the Settlement precludes Town Council from taking either of these actions. As we are fast approaching the one-year anniversary of the original settlement, Town Council is urged to follow Mr. Appel’s opinions and act immediately to call an emergency session of Council to approve the hiring of outside legal counsel to advise on the filing of a Declaratory Judgement and a Rule 60 request for relief under the court order.

“Town Council is likely the only entity with legal standing to take these actions. They were elected in the largest voter turn-out in island history – and now History is watching them,” Byko said. “It is their duty to do everything they can to protect this amazing natural resource that benefits the entire Lowcountry. Please come to the Town Council meeting on Tuesday and urge them to take action.”

Sullivan’s Island for All is a 501(c)4 nonprofit with a mission to preserve the Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest and accreted land in its natural state for the benefit, protection and enjoyment of all.

Wednesday headlines: Haley tapped for lifetime Clemson board seat

Former S.C. Gov. and United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley, who now lives at Kiawah Island, has been appointed to fill a lifetime seat on the Clemson University Board of Trustees vacated by former House Speaker David Wilkins of Greenville. Wilkins also served as ambassador to Canada in the Bush administration in the early 2000s. More: SC Public Radio, ...

Former S.C. Gov. and United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley, who now lives at Kiawah Island, has been appointed to fill a lifetime seat on the Clemson University Board of Trustees vacated by former House Speaker David Wilkins of Greenville. Wilkins also served as ambassador to Canada in the Bush administration in the early 2000s. More: SC Public Radio, The Post and Courier

In other headlines:

First in-person S.C. State Fair since start of pandemic opens today. The South Carolina State Fair returns Wednesday after last year’s drive-thru event brought on by higher numbers of infections during the height of the coronavirus pandemic. More: Associated Press, The State, The Post and Courier

Civil rights groups sue McMaster, state lawmakers over redistricting process. Two civil rights groups are suing South Carolina, saying state lawmakers are taking too long to draw new district maps. More: Associated Press, WCSC TV, The State, The Post and Courier

Charleston ports operating smoothly despite record volume, supply chain woes. More ships are adjusting their schedules to visit Charleston-area ports earlier than planned, with cargo continuing to move smoothly despite record volumes. More: The Post and Courier

Sullivan’s Island seeks attorney opinion on Maritime Forest settlement. Sullivan’s Island Town Council has decided to get an opinion from a Greenville attorney about the legal path forward in their Maritime Forest settlement. More: WCSC TV

To get dozens of South Carolina news stories every business day, contact the folks at SC Clips.

Sullivan’s Island Town Council Calls Special Meeting Involving Maritime Forest

By Karen Byko for Island Eye NewsIn a major development regarding efforts to save the Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest from destruction, the island’s Town Council has called a Special Meeting to act on a “Public Request for Clarification of Mediated Settlement Bluestein v. Town of Sullivan’s Island 2010-CP-10-5449.” (See Attached). The meeting is Wednesday, September 29 at 5pm...

By Karen Byko for Island Eye News

In a major development regarding efforts to save the Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest from destruction, the island’s Town Council has called a Special Meeting to act on a “Public Request for Clarification of Mediated Settlement Bluestein v. Town of Sullivan’s Island 2010-CP-10-5449.” (See Attached). The meeting is Wednesday, September 29 at 5pm. This is in response to an overwhelming number of residents who went to the last Town Council meeting asking council to find out if the settlement agreement that will allow the cutting of the Maritime Forest was lawfully entered into.

In May, four members of the current council were elected in a landslide, which many considered a public response to concerns involving the controversial Mediation Settlement. The settlement, which will allow for widespread cutting of the Maritime Forest was passed last October, during the height of the pandemic with little public input or review. The Maritime Forest provides protection for all islanders from hurricanes and storm surge, while also housing a unique and expansive wildlife ecosystem.

“On September 21st, citizens from around the island and the Lowcountry showed up to voice their concerns and it appears Town Council has listened,” said Sullivan’s Island for All President Karen Byko. “We are hoping they will take steps to review this mediation settlement in the courts.”

LEGAL OPINION SHEDS LIGHT ON PATH FORWARD

Despite past warnings from those who wrote the settlement that it is ‘unchallengeable,’ there actually is a path forward and there is legal precedent to do so.

The public deserves to know:

? Was the settlement agreement lawfully entered into?

? Does the settlement unlawfully bind future Town Council’s legislative and governmental powers?

? Is there a legal path forward for Town Council?

To get these answers, Land-Use and Environmental Lawyer Ross Appel researched the issue and provided a thoroughly documented legal opinion to Sullivan’s Island for All that Town Council has two clear legal mechanisms available to challenge the settlement and the court order approving the settlement.

1. The Declaratory Judgement Act: This Act expressly exists for parties to an agreement to be able to determine their rights and responsibilities without first having to default under a contract.

2. Rule 60 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure: This rule provides several options for seeking relief from an approved court order.

Based on legal precedents, it is Mr. Appel’s opinion, that nothing in the Settlement precludes Town Council from taking either of these actions. As we are fast approaching the one-year anniversary of the original settlement, Town Council is urged to follow Mr. Appel’s opinions and act immediately to approve the hiring of outside legal counsel to advise on the filing of a Declaratory Judgement and a Rule 60 request for relief under the court order.

“We want Town Council to know that we respect their courage and resolve to see this vital issue through,” Byko said.

Crab Bank restoration begins; project stresses public safety

Charleston, S.C. -- Construction activity began early this September on the restoration of the Crab Bank Seabird Sanctuary, nestled in Charleston Harbor between the tip of Sullivan’s Island and Patriots Point.The restoration of Crab Bank was identified as a beneficial use alternative for dredged material in 2011 during the feasibility study for the Charleston Harbor Post 45 Deepening Project. To help offset additional costs, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources stepped up to serve as the project’s required non-fe...

Charleston, S.C. -- Construction activity began early this September on the restoration of the Crab Bank Seabird Sanctuary, nestled in Charleston Harbor between the tip of Sullivan’s Island and Patriots Point.

The restoration of Crab Bank was identified as a beneficial use alternative for dredged material in 2011 during the feasibility study for the Charleston Harbor Post 45 Deepening Project. To help offset additional costs, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources stepped up to serve as the project’s required non-federal sponsor.

When finished, the project will create roughly 32 acres of prime nesting habitat for many coastal birds that frequent the Lowcountry. The project uses approximately 660,000 cubic yards of compatible material from the Charleston Harbor Post 45 Deepening project. Rather than moving the material miles offshore to the ocean placement site, it will be reused in this highly beneficial way, creating a “win-win” for all.

During construction, USACE asks boaters and paddlers in the vicinity of Shem Creek, the Mount Pleasant Old Village shoreline, and the federal navigation channel between Castle Pinckney and Fort Sumter to take extra precautions. This type of operation is not typical in this section of the harbor.

In addition to the aptly-named Dredge “Charleston,” the area will also have several support vessels, floating and submerged pipelines, and auxiliary equipment. These are all hazards to boaters and paddlers in the immediate area.

Boaters and paddlers should keep a safe distance, use slow speeds, and be hyper-aware of submerged and floating pipelines, especially when there is poor visibility. The public should not approach the equipment or the restored footprint. The project can be viewed at a safe distance at locations such as the Pitt Street Bridge, the Shem Creek Boardwalk or Alhambra Hall Park.

Residents and businesses may also experience some noise and lights that are not normally present due to the close proximity of the work to the shoreline. Earthmoving equipment outfitted with lights and audible signals that are required by safety regulations will be mobilized and operate around the clock.

While this may create some short-term inconvenience, the long-term benefits of a restored Crab Bank will be a major benefit to the shorebirds and our community.

“We are thrilled this important work has begun, but it is challenging, and we want it completed as safely and expeditiously as possible,” said Lt. Col. Andrew Johannes, district commander.

Construction is expected to take a few months, depending on weather and equipment.

“As the Charleston District celebrates 150-years of service to both South Carolina and the nation, Crab Bank is just another in a long list of projects we have undertaken to support both the environment and economy,” Johannes said.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.