Gutter Cleaning in
Sullivan's Island SC

Ask Us Anything!

843 606 0798

Quick Quote

The Gutter Gorilla Difference

When it comes to gutter cleaning in Sullivan's Island, SC, our philosophy is simple: provide our clients with quality, dependable gutter services at a fair price. Unlike some gutter cleaning companies, we believe in honesty, hard work, and helpful advice. At the end of the day, your satisfaction is our primary goal. Before we pull out of your driveway, we will take the extra time to educate you about the work we performed. That way, you can sleep with confidence, knowing that your gutters are working correctly. We genuinely take pride in our work and strive to treat your home like it was our own, so you can focus on your obligations while we handle the dirty work. Regardless of the gutter service you choose, you can rest easy knowing your home is in the hands of trained, insured professionals. Whether you need a simple gutter repair or a complete gutter installation, we have the skills to get the job done with a level of service and quality unmatched by our competition. No shortcuts. No compromises. Only efficient, trustworthy gutter services in Sullivan's Island.

Service Areas

Gutter Cleaning in Sullivan's Island, SC

We treat every gutter project as a top priority. Attention to detail is the heart and soul of our business. We go far beyond providing simple gutter services, giving you incredible insight into your seamless gutters project. Your gutter installation will be handled by licensed and insured professionals. It all starts here, please begin below.

foundation-damage.jpg

Foundation Damage

The primary role of your gutter system is to channel water off of your roof and direct it away from your home’s foundation. Gutter blockages can result in water running over the sides of your gutters. That water will eventually settle around your foundation. With time, pooling water will affect the reliability of your home’s structure, causing cracks, mold growth, and even collapse.

Wood-Damage.jpg

Wood Damage

Your home’s gutter system is held up by fascia boards, which are typically made of wood. When your clogged gutters overflow with water, your fascia boards will begin to rot. On top of that, your fascia boards must hold the increased weight of your clogged gutters. The combination of rot and weight can cause your gutter system to fail, resulting in expensive repairs.

Landscaping-Damage

Landscaping Damage

If you want to maintain the beauty of your landscaping, having clog-free gutters is essential. When your gutters can’t do their job, overflowing water will pour down the sides of your home. Eventually, this water will damage the trees, shrubs, and flower beds close to the base of your home.

Gutter-Damage.jpg

Gutter Damage

When your gutters are full of leaves and other debris, rainwater, and other forms of precipitation have nowhere to go. This causes water to fill your gutters to the brim. Because each gallon of water weighs around eight pounds, this extra weight will cause your gutters to crack, bend, or even tear away from your roof. Your gutters are rendered completely useless at that point, and you’re looking at very expensive repairs.

If you don’t have the time and patience to commit to proper gutter cleaning, The Gutter Gorilla team is here to help. We have been cleaning gutters in Sullivan's Island for years. With a fully trained team of gutter professionals on staff, we have the experience and resources to clean your gutters effectively and efficiently.

Common Signs of Clogged Gutters

One of the most common questions we get at The Gutter Gorilla centers around when homeowners need gutter cleaning in Sullivan's Island, SC. The answer is nuanced, but generally speaking, your gutters need to be cleaned twice a year or whenever they become clogged. Unfortunately, it’s not exactly easy for the average homeowner to climb up on a ladder, get on their roof, and look to see if their gutters are full of debris.

Luckily, there are some common signs that you can look out for to save yourself from costly repairs:

Sagging-Gutters-1

Sagging Gutters

When debris like pine needles and leaves begin to build up in your gutters, the increased weight can cause your gutters to bend and sag. When this happens, your gutters can’t do their job of directing water away from your home. If your gutters appear to be sagging, chances are they are clogged.

Birds-and-Pests-2.png

Birds and Pests

Animals like birds find gutters a very appealing place to make a nest. If you notice birds or other critters scurrying around in your gutters, it can be a tell-tale sign that your gutters are clogged with nest-making materials.

Stains-on-Your-Siding-1

Stains on Your Siding

If you see stains on your siding, there is a good chance that your gutters are clogged, and standing water is overflowing onto your siding. This overflow of water can damage the fascia boards behind your gutters and can also affect your roof’s shingles.

Plant-Life-1

Plant Life

It might sound far-fetched, but if your gutters have enough dirt and debris buildup, seeds within that dirt can sprout, causing a garden to grow in your gutters. If you notice signs of plant growth in your gutters, they are most likely clogged and need to be cleaned ASAP.

In today’s fast-paced world, we understand that your time is precious. If you believe your gutters are clogged but don’t have the time to check, we would be happy to travel to your home for an initial gutter inspection.

During your inspection, our team will check your gutters for clogs and debris. While we are inspecting your gutters for clogs, we will also keep an eye out for signs of wear and tear and other issues that might cause damage to your home. When we’re done, we will go over what we found and provide you with a cost-effective solution for any problems that arise. That way, you can spend more time focusing on your family and your life and less time worrying about fixing your gutters by yourself.

Gutter Installation in Sullivan's Island, SC

Buying a home is one of the largest financial investments that you will make as an adult. As a homeowner, you know that protecting that investment is a priority. While most homeowners do a good job of staying up to date with home maintenance, sometimes life happens, and things begin to slip through the cracks. For many homeowners, gutters and downspouts are often one of those overlooked items.

Whether you need gutters installed on your new home or your old gutter system is dilapidated and needs replacing, we’ve got your back.

Gutter-Installation-sc

At The Gutter Gorilla, we specialize in custom gutter installation in Sullivan's Island, SC. Because we have our own machinery, we are essentially cutting out middlemen manufacturers so that our customers benefit from lower prices and higher quality gutter systems. We strive to be friendly, affordable, and effective. We will always make your schedule a priority over our own.

When you trust The Gutter Gorilla with your new gutter installation, know that you are working with the best in the business.

Here are just a few reasons why we are the premier gutter installation company in Sullivan's Island:

  • We only use premium materials and install seamless, 6” aluminum k-style gutters to hold more water.
  • Our installation methods are tried and tested.
  • Our gutter installation experts are knowledgeable, friendly, and ready to work hard for you.
  • We offer a warranty on all our products and services.
  • We are licensed and insured.
  • Your satisfaction is our #1 concern. We back that up with actions, not words.

When Should You Consider Gutter Installation?

Sometimes, it can be difficult to determine whether you need new gutter installation or gutter repairs. The most reliable answer will come after our team has had a chance to inspect your gutters in Sullivan's Island. Before you call our office to schedule an inspection, consider the following symptoms of a failing gutter system:

  • Gutters are starting to pull apart and separate.
  • Gutter guards are starting to sag and pull away from the roof.
  • The gutter hangers have begun to break or bend.
  • Downspouts are starting to crease or are no longer straight.
  • Gutters show signs of rust or have visible holes.
Gutter-Installation-sc

Quick, Reliable Gutter Repairs in Sullivan's Island, SC

Cleaning and repairing gutters can be a tiresome task. We understand that the last thing you want to do with your free time is to try and figure out how to repair your damaged gutters. However, gutters that are left unrepaired can cause extensive damage to your home and lawn. If you see that your gutters are damaged, you must get them repaired by a professional as soon as possible. Gutter repairs range in complexity and can be as simple as patching a hole in one of your downspouts to re-securing gutters on your home’s fascia board. We recommend that you call our office to schedule a gutter inspection, so our team can get a full understanding of the repairs that need completing.

Here are a few signs that you should be aware of that usually require gutter repairs in Sullivan's Island, SC:

icon-Pooling-Water
Pooling Water
Puddles of water accumulating near your home’s foundation
icon-Leaks
Leaks
The next time it rains, grab your umbrella and check your gutters for signs of drips or leaks.
icon-Displaced-Hardware
Displaced Hardware
If you notice gutter-hanging hardware laying on the ground under the edge of your roof, it’s time to call in The Gutter Gorilla. This is a sign that your gutters aren’t fastened securely. One strong gust of wind or heavy rainstorm could cause serious damage to your gutter system.
mold
Mold
Check your basement and your attic for signs of mold growth. If you see any mold or mildew, your gutters might not be doing their job of directing water away from your home.
iconPeeling-Paint
Peeling Paint
Have you noticed that paint is starting to peel down the side of your house? Is there rust beginning to form on your gutters? If so, you could be dealing with a leak. Usually, the result of rust or a puncture, this type of problem needs to be patched by a professional
Uneven-Gutters
Uneven Gutters
If your gutters are uneven or starting to sag in the middle, it’s not a good sign. In situations like these, pooling water will not be able to drain towards your corner downspouts. Eventually, the entire gutter will pull away from your home. It is highly recommended that you hire our team of professionals to repair this problem before it gets even worse.

The Trusted Choice for All Your Gutter Needs in Sullivan's Island

At The Gutter Gorilla, our commitment is to provide you with an easy, care-free, educational experience. When you give us the opportunity to earn your business, you can trust that we will provide you with the highest quality gutter repair services at the best prices in the Lowcountry. From the moment we first visit your home for an inspection to the time we do our final walk though, your satisfaction is our top priority.

Ready to get started? Start your free estimate right from our website, or give our office a call today to learn more about our exceptional gutter services in Sullivan's Island. We will handle the heavy lifting while you spend your free time enjoying life!

Contact Us

Latest News in Sullivan's Island

ANDY BRACK: Weekend challenge –read the Declaration of Independence

Today’s column was going to be about earmarks and pork-barrel spending. Or why the governor decided to go against the legislature and veto a bunch of spending that lawmakers wanted. And how when any South Carolina governor picks a battle with the General Assembly, particularly over how it wants to spend money, the governor generally loses because we live in a legislative state where intransigence and stubbornness continually catapult us to the bottom of lists.But you’ve probably heard that kind of blather before.So ...

Today’s column was going to be about earmarks and pork-barrel spending. Or why the governor decided to go against the legislature and veto a bunch of spending that lawmakers wanted. And how when any South Carolina governor picks a battle with the General Assembly, particularly over how it wants to spend money, the governor generally loses because we live in a legislative state where intransigence and stubbornness continually catapult us to the bottom of lists.

But you’ve probably heard that kind of blather before.

So instead, consider this: What we really need to be doing this weekend as we celebrate the country’s declaration against tyranny is to find a quiet spot to read and then seriously consider the 1,339 words of our Declaration of Independence.

Better yet: Sit down as a family and read it out loud together.

Just six months ago, a bloodthirsty mob misused and misappropriated the fundamental principles enshrouded in American freedom by trying to rip apart our democracy in favor of the very tyranny which our forefathers fought in the fields of Camden and King’s Mountain, the swamps of the Lowcountry and forts from Ninety Six to Sullivan’s Island.

You may know by heart the opening words of the document penned by Thomas Jefferson and others that espouses the values of “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” You may remember the part that follows and discusses how it’s the people’s right to alter or abolish a government that fails, which is oft-cited by those who threw the destructive tantrum and bludgeoned the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

But they conveniently forget the cautious words that followed. Perhaps they missed that day in civics class. Or maybe they were so hellbent on getting their own way that they were blinded by the wisdom of colonial leaders who first focused not on a violent overthrow of power, but on reason and intellect to devise a new system to create a safe nation where all could pursue happiness:

“Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.”

The Declaration continued by offering a list of abuses by the King of England. As you read of compounding restrictions that denied liberty to colonists, it should dawn on you how our forefathers eventually corrected those abuses with a constitution that created a representative democracy that became the world’s beacon of freedom, a continuing experiment in liberty that changed the course of humankind.

Furthermore, the Declaration is remarkable in another way. It frames the patience of colonists who wanted better lives for their families. Compare their years of endurance to get redress of their grievances to the volcanic violence that erupted in the halls of freedom over a few hours in January.

Soaring real estate sales and high prices mean more property tax for SC towns, cities

Soaring home prices and a surge in real estate sales that began in 2020 should create an unusual rise in property taxes for many South Carolina towns and cities.That’s because in South Carolina many homes are taxed on far less than they are worth — until the ownership changes. A sale triggers a reassessment, so that the property is taxed on its full value, which can mean a large jump in the tax bill. How houses are taxed Under S.C. property tax laws, homes are often taxed on less than they are worth,...

Soaring home prices and a surge in real estate sales that began in 2020 should create an unusual rise in property taxes for many South Carolina towns and cities.

That’s because in South Carolina many homes are taxed on far less than they are worth — until the ownership changes. A sale triggers a reassessment, so that the property is taxed on its full value, which can mean a large jump in the tax bill.

For local governments, homes that were already receiving public services can suddenly start contributing more tax money because of an ownership change. And in 2020, there were far more of those than usual.

In a typical year, that piece of the property tax puzzle is not a big deal for municipal budgets. For example, in the greater Charleston area from 2016 through 2019, the number of homes sold from one year to the next didn’t change by more than 4 percent, and the average home price didn’t rise by more than $20,000.

Last year, homes sales in the Charleston area increased by 17.2 percent, and the average price rose by $46,913, according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors. In the first five months of 2021, the average home sale price increased by another $66,265.

“Cities are going to see an increase in their property tax revenues simply as a function of prices being reset at the sale prices,” said Scott Slatton, director of advocacy and communications for the Municipal Association of South Carolina.

“That’s what Act 388 does,” he said, referring to the statewide changes in property tax laws that took effect in 2007.

Act 388 gave sweeping tax relief to homeowners, partly by capping how much their taxable property values could rise during countywide reassessments as long as the ownership didn’t change.

For example, there’s a house on James Island that Charleston County had calculated was worth $634,014 during the latest countywide reassessment. But due to Act 388 it was taxed as if it were worth $421,216. That house was sold in late 2020 for $625,000, and that sale should reset the taxable value to approximately the sale price, adding more than $200,000 to the city of Charleston’s tax base.

Changes like that account for a small percentage of municipal revenue, but in 2021 it will be a larger amount than usual. For now, Charleston County’s budget assumes that reassessments due to home sales will raise the tax base just 2 percent, and towns and cities don’t appear to be anticipating an unusual rise in revenue.

“You don’t want to budget an unknown,” Charleston’s Chief Financial Officer Amy Wharton said. “It would be kind of hard for us to predict.”

In Charleston County, local governments won’t know the value of all the property they can tax until September, when the county auditor’s office provides the data. By then, most will have already approved new yearly budgets, many of which begin on July 1.

“I don’t think you’re going to have a bunch of folks going out and buying firetrucks because the real estate market is hot,” county Auditor Peter Tecklenburg said.

He thinks town and city officials will wait to see hard numbers, which he believes will show larger than usual increases.

“We’ve had a lot more homes sold,” Tecklenburg said. “A lot of that is going to show in specific places, like Mount Pleasant.”

That would be great, said the town’s Chief Financial Officer Marcy Cotov.

“I’m looking forward to September to find out how well I did with budgeting,” she said. “I don’t try to estimate home sales.”

Cotov said if foreclosures increase as mortgage forbearance programs end, that could offset some gains in the property tax base.

The blazing hot real estate market has been particularly evident in more costly areas, including Mount Pleasant and the barrier islands near Charleston.

On Sullivan’s Island, for example, one house the county valued for tax purposes at $6 million in 2020 was sold in November for $8.2 million. That single sale would add $2.2 million to the town’s property tax base.

For most taxpayers, the question will be what their town, city or county does with any unexpected boost in revenue. More money could ease pressure to raise taxes, for example, or fund more services.

Mount Pleasant and Charleston both increased their property tax last year and cut expenses as other revenue sources such a hospitality-related taxes and business license taxes declined during the pandemic.

“Let’s just say September is like ‘wow,’ ” said Cotov. “Town Council always has three choices (with property tax rates): up, the same, or down.”

Sullivan’s Island angler places 3rd in tarpon fly fishing tournament in Florida Keys

Baker Bishop, a businessman from Sullivan’s Island, finished third in the 47th annual Don Hawley Invitational Fly Fishing Tarpon Tournament held in the Florida Keys.Weather was a challenge for this year’s event and only 85 fish were caught on fly during the five-day tournament.Julian Robertson of Vero Beach, Fla., with guide Rob Fordyce, won the tournament with 15 releases. It was the second time Robertson has won the tournament and seventh time Fordyce has guided the top angler. They had five releases the final day...

Baker Bishop, a businessman from Sullivan’s Island, finished third in the 47th annual Don Hawley Invitational Fly Fishing Tarpon Tournament held in the Florida Keys.

Weather was a challenge for this year’s event and only 85 fish were caught on fly during the five-day tournament.

Julian Robertson of Vero Beach, Fla., with guide Rob Fordyce, won the tournament with 15 releases. It was the second time Robertson has won the tournament and seventh time Fordyce has guided the top angler. They had five releases the final day.

Evan Carruthers of Maple Plain, Minn., with guide Greg Dini, was second with 10 releases. Baker and his guide, Alonzo Sotillo, were close behind with nine releases and had the most releases on the second day and fourth day with three releases each.

“Alonzo and I just started fishing together last year so we’re a pretty good team. He’s awesome, hungry, a great guide,” Bishop said.

The Hawley is one of the “Big Three” tarpon fly tournaments in the Keys, along with the Golden Fly and the Gold Cup. All are invitationals and Bishop, 47, has been fishing all three for about 20 years.

The Hawley was the first tarpon tournament to stop killing fish in 1987. Anglers receive 1,000 points for each fish measuring four feet or more caught and released on 12-pound tippet, in accordance with International Game Fish Association rules. The grand champion title is awarded to the angler and guide with the most fish caught and released during the five day competition. In addition to other awards, grand champion names will be added to the perpetual trophy showcasing the names of all past champion anglers and guides. The perpetual trophy resides at Florida Keys Outfitters in Islamorada, Florida.

Bishop said anglers “hook the fish, get him through the jump, run him down and pop him off. It’s very conservation-minded.”

Bishop owns a logistics and freight installation company while his wife Cortney Bishop is a well-known designer. He grew up in Knoxville, went to school in Montana and fly fished for trout, winning plenty of tournaments with fish much smaller than tarpon. They lived in Bozeman, Montana, until tiring of the cold. Following a brief relocation to Knoxville, they moved to Sullivan’s Island in 2004.

“My mother was a world-class angler and in about 2000 she traveled to the Keys to visit some friends. She called me afterwards and said you have to come down here and check this place out,” Bishop said.

“The first day I went out I caught a 60-pound tarpon and I was ruined. It took three or four years of really practicing my butt off in the yard and coming down here before I could actually compete with these guys. It’s such a higher level than trout fishing. It’s like going from college to the NFL overnight and I had a lot of catching up to do.”

Proceeds from the tournament benefit the Guides Trust Foundation, which assists Florida Keys guides in times of hardship and provides scholarships to Florida Keys students interested in the marine sciences. Next year’s tournament will take place June 6-10. For more information or to apply for the tournament’s waiting list, go to guidestrustfoundation.org.

New flounder regulations

New flounder catch and size limits go into effect July 1 in an effort to help rebuild the stock that has fallen to historically low levels because of overfishing. The new regulations include a catch limit of five fish per person per day with a 10-fish boat limit. The minimum size limit for flounder will be 16 inches. The previous catch and size limits were 10 fish per person and 20 per boat with a 15-inch minimum size limit.

America’s Boating Club Charleston will hold boating safety classes July 10 and July 31 at 1376 Orange Grove Road, Charleston. The classes begin at 9 a.m. and end around 4 p.m. Successful participants earn the S.C. Department of Natural Resources Boater Education Card. The cost is $25 for adults and youth 12-18 are free. Call 843-312-2876 or email lynest@tds.net.

The Hooked on Miracles King Mackerel Tournament will be held July 17 out of Ripley Light Yacht Club. Proceeds from the tournament benefit the MUSC Children’s Hospital. The captain’s meeting for the tournament will be held from 5-9 p.m. July 15, with an MUSC children’s outing aboard the Billistic on July 16. Fishing hours on July 17 are from 6:30 a.m.-5 p.m. with check-in from 2-5 p.m. First prize, based on 125 paid entrants, is $25,000. The entry fee is $400 per boat.

Darius Rucker Shares Why He Doesn\'t Miss Being the Frontman for \"The Biggest Band in the World\"

There\'s good reason we named Darius Rucker our Southerner of the Year for 2021. He\'s forged an incredibly successful path as both the frontman for Hootie & the Blowfish and as a solo artist. He\'s a devoted philanthropist. He embodies a Southern state of mind (so much so, he even has a song named "Southern State of Mind). Oh, and he thinks ...

There\'s good reason we named Darius Rucker our Southerner of the Year for 2021. He\'s forged an incredibly successful path as both the frontman for Hootie & the Blowfish and as a solo artist. He\'s a devoted philanthropist. He embodies a Southern state of mind (so much so, he even has a song named "Southern State of Mind). Oh, and he thinks nothing beats a Sullivan\'s Island sunset.

But long before there were GRAMMYs and CMA awards, sold-out amphitheater tours, and chart-topping singles, there was just Rucker and his Hootie bandmates playing dingy dives and small club shows in the late \'80s and early \'90s. Those are the days for which he yearns.

"People always ask me if I miss when we were the biggest band in the world and I always say, \'No,\'" Rucker said in a recent episode of Apple Music\'s "Essentials Radio" with host Kelleigh Bannen, per CMT.com. "I miss when it was us against the world. When we were playing those clubs and it was just five of us showing up and doing what we do. I miss those days," he confessed, adding that they managed to make a pretty good living at this, "so we weren\'t even really fretting about a record deal and anything." Summing up that irreplaceable feeling of living in a state of flow, he added: "But it was just us against the world. I mean, it sounds so cliché but that really was. All we knew was we had to be to the next town the next night."

Then, a September 1994 performance on CBS\' The Late Show with David Letterman performing a song off of their 1994 album, Cracked Rear View, that changed everything: "We played \'Hold My Hand\' the first time on Letterman, and our lives changed overnight. And that\'s not [an] exaggeration. Overnight," Rucker recalled. "Nobody was trying to add us. Some stations in the south were playing us because we were playing their towns in the clubs, but nobody was trying to play our record. And we went on David Letterman on Friday and on Monday everybody added it. I mean, it was crazy."

Indeed, they\'ve come a long way from those dimly-lit club shows. While Rucker may have fame and fortune now, it\'s clear that the singer always stays grounded and humble, and savoring those SC sunsets.

Army Corps of Engineers will monitor Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest cutting

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A Sullivan’s Island conservation group says the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will be monitoring, but not regulating, the upcoming clearing of the island’s maritime forest.After the Sullivan’s Island Town Council approved a settlement for the reduction of the island’s maritime forest, a conservation group called Sullivan’s Island ...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A Sullivan’s Island conservation group says the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will be monitoring, but not regulating, the upcoming clearing of the island’s maritime forest.

After the Sullivan’s Island Town Council approved a settlement for the reduction of the island’s maritime forest, a conservation group called Sullivan’s Island for All said they were interested in preserving the woodlands as they stand.

That first vote took place in early October 2020, but the same town council amended their original plan in March 2021.

The Sullivan’s Island Town Council voted 4-2 to amend their original ruling and specified that the maritime forest could only be cleared if crews didn’t use heavy machinery like bulldozers to remove trees.

Sullivan’s Island for All says the Army Corps determined that the cutting plan would subsequently fall outside of their regulatory authority. The conservation group says the Army Corps provided no opinion on how ecologically destructive the plan is, only that the proposed work method is not considered to be a regulated activity.

The Army Corps’ regulatory oversight is limited to the discharge of dredged or fill material into jurisdictional waters, such as wetlands, Sullivan’s Island for All says.

According to the conservation group, the amended plan dropped the use of heavy machinery like bulldozers because it would have discharged fill into the wetlands and left the plan vulnerable to the Army Corps’ regulatory abilities. Instead, Sullivan’s Island for All says the amended ruling has led those who want to cut the forest to use chainsaws and poisonous herbicides.

While the amended ruling would have discouraged the Army Corps’ involvement, Sullivan’s Island for All says a recent ruling from the Corps signaled they would be closely watching to ensure Sullivan’s Island complies with all environmental regulations.

“Regardless of whether or not this plan uses chainsaws and poison instead of bulldozers to remove and cut thousands of trees and shrubs, the result is the same: this plan puts the public’s safety at risk by removing our storm surge protection,” Sullivan’s Island for All President Karen Byko said. “This is a dangerous plan that impacts our island’s resiliency and destroys a critically important wildlife habitat.”

Byko said the area is home to a wide variety of species including turtles, migratory birds, egrets, foxes, and dragonflies. She says poisoning the trees has some worried that the herbicide will do damage to the area’s water systems.

“We have concerns about this herbicide, that will literally be painted on tree stumps. There are no guarantees these toxic chemicals won’t be absorbed into the soil, contaminating wetlands or groundwater. Many are also concerned about runoff into storm water to the marsh, impacting the entire food chain,” Byko said.

Sullivan’s Island for All says they remain optimistic after a new pro-conservation Town Council was sworn in on June 15th.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.